×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

China PM Wants to Rule Global Tech With India

samzenpus posted more than 9 years ago | from the almost-there dept.

Technology 1020

GrumpyDeveloper writes "As reported in this Wired story, China's prime minister said Sunday that China and India should work together to dominate the world's tech industry, bringing together Chinese hardware with Indian software.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

FP (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200679)

How are you gentlemen. All your base are belong to U.S.

One word. (0, Offtopic)

halivar (535827) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200682)

No.

Re:One word. (2, Interesting)

icemanuea (827734) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200754)

You're not looking at the bigger picture. For the consumers it will become a better deal. With much lower software/hardware development costs, these savings can inevitably be passed on to the customers. The only way China and India can establish themselves into the market is to undercut the prices of existing products and technologies. This should (fingers crossed) jump start an agressive price war -> cheap products of equal or better quality!!

Re:One word. (1)

PeteDotNu (689884) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200906)

In the short term, this much is true. In the long run, China and India would gain a monopoly, get greedy, raise their prices, and the balance would swing back to the West.

The only company that wouldn't survive this, as far as I can see, would be Microsoft, as they wouldn't be willing to acknowledge the threat and accordingly cut THEIR prices to compete.

Shame.

I should probably elaborate... (4, Interesting)

halivar (535827) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200774)

Despite China's usage of FOSS, they're the only people I trust less than MS. Today's software overlords, the US + EU, is bad enough with managing things like privacy and fair use.

China's management of the internet ought to give us some idea of what they would do with a monopoly on internet tech.

Re:I should probably elaborate... (2, Insightful)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200927)

atleast with the FOSS method you can roll your own and not have to depend on the whim of corporations & governments...

Re:One word. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200926)

This might be a good thing. Do you think harware manufacturers in China are going to give a rat's ass about 'Trusted Computing' and harware-level DRM that media cartels want? Funny how we may have to look to China to preserve freedom over our own computing property.

Chinese hardware with Indian software? (0, Troll)

Nosf3ratu (702029) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200690)

Wow!

That reminds me a lot of that new and exciting iced cream flavor by Ben & Jerry's: Dog Shit with Horse Shit Covered Pieces of Rat Shit.

Yum.

new Asian century (-1, Redundant)

bfline (859619) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200703)

On a visit to India's southern technology hub of Bangalore, Premier Wen Jiabao said the two nations should put aside their historic rivalries for the venture and welcome a new "Asian century."

I for one will welcome our new Asian masters.

re: new asian century (1)

ed.han (444783) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200726)

here's the quote that's got me scratching my head:

" it will signify the coming of the asian century of the IT industry."

isn't it already?

ed

Re:new Asian century (2, Interesting)

fishdan (569872) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200802)

...the two nations should put aside their historic rivalries...

I can't help but think that it is no coincidence that this is going on at the same time as anti-japanese riots [independent.co.uk] in Japan. Seems like China is pulling out the stops to truly become the dominant Asian power.

Re:new Asian century (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200839)

Ummm, I think you mean anti-japanese riots in China.

Re:new Asian century (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200896)

This should be easy to accomplish, now that we have ceded hardware manufacturing to China and outsourced software development to India.

Chinese Hardware & Indian Software (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200709)

Somewhere, there's a joke begging to be told.

Re:Chinese Hardware & Indian Software (4, Insightful)

Mindwarp (15738) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200885)

Somewhere, there's a joke begging to be told.

Let's see if we're all still laughing in 18 months.

Re:Chinese Hardware & Indian Software (2)

Asmodai (13932) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200922)

Simple:

be glad it is not the other way around. ;)

Just Maybe (2, Insightful)

Alien54 (180860) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200940)

we should encourage the USA company Microsoft to try to take over this market? We should encourage the Microsoft Monopoly as good for America? Maybe we should permit the monopoly to continue so long as they use their overly high prices to hire more patriotic americans?

Is what is good for the USA also good for Microsoft? is what is good for Microsoft good for the USA? Is Microsoft the last great hope for Planet Earth?

;-)

Re:Chinese Hardware & Indian Software (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200961)

If anybody can overtake the American dominance of badly-written software on shoddy hardware, it's India and China.

This threat is bound to keep Steve Balmer awake at night.

Good. (5, Funny)

Seumas (6865) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200710)

If American tech workers can't compete at the pennies-per-hour salary range, then they deserve to lose their jobs to the superior foreign technological forces. And stop whining about "oh, but I need to buy groceries" and "I need to save up for my child's college fund and my retirement".

At least, this is what I've heard.

I, for one, welcome our new high-school management retail wage-slave jobs of the future.

Re:Good. (0)

missing000 (602285) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200764)

derp a der!

Re:Good. (1)

MindStalker (22827) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200801)

I always looked at it as an efficiency helper. Like how when computers were comming out all the geeks said, no they won't destroy your jobs, they will just make you more efficient so more can get done cheaper. More is getting done cheaper when you ship it overseas. Produce the food cheap enough, create the technology cheap enough it drives down prices compared to wages where everybody can afford to live doing less work. Now we just need to get land cheaper thats the real hurdle.

Global perception... (2, Insightful)

PornMaster (749461) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200826)

I think that it's fair to say that this is the first time in history that people everywhere else see America whining about its inability to compete.

In times past, the American workforce was something to admire. I don't think that's the case any longer.

Re:Global perception... (5, Insightful)

Seumas (6865) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200889)

Except it isn't a matter of being unable to compete.

There is nothing lacking in the skill, talent and dedication of American employees. It is simply that employees in America have to pay American prices for rent, housing, transportation, food, clothing, education and health care. Corporations have the entire planet to search for qualified and extremely cheap labor.

If American tech workers had the entire world to choose from for sourcing out their necessary purchases for living, they could live cheaper, too. If Joe Techie lives in a country where a gallon of milk is almost $4 and the average cost of a house is $200,000 - how can you expect him to survive on the wages of someone who lives in a country where that would buy five houses?!

Re:Good. (1)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200910)

If American tech workers can't compete at the pennies-per-hour salary range, then they deserve to lose their jobs to the superior foreign technological forces.

It is more than about lost jobs: it is about national security. We won't know how to run anything if China pulls the plug.

The US once let the Soviet Union "steal" oil pipeline control software in which the CIA added subtle hacks in their copy to blow up pipelines. It worked, and the Soviet economy and lives took a big blow.

We are setting ourselves up for the same thing. We cannot claim it is evil or terrorism, because we already pulled that kind of trick. It does not even have to be explosions, it could be financial problems.

Re:Good. (2, Insightful)

TomorrowPlusX (571956) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200943)

You've GOT to look in the long term. Like 50 or 100 years.

When we, ( I mean America, the "West" and probably Japan ) no longer make anything, or design anything, but only consume, consume consume... we will fall apart.

Everything we buy will be designed in China or India, and made in China or India. Our universities (if they're still relevant, and haven't been shut down by the evangelical right-wing) will be educating Chinese or Indians in math, science, engineering, etc while we get degrees in "communications" and get jobs pushing paper around, so we can buy chinese products.

Such an aritficial economy can't support itself, and we'll *probably* collapse into some sort of 3rd world police state. Here I'm referring to America -- we've been tottering on being a plice state for like 50 years, an economic collapse would push us over the edge.

Meanwhile, China and India will have become what America was 40 years ago -- the Big Cheese, but *too* successful. Fat on money and industry, with those pesky (educated) workers demanding high falutin' things like medicare, wages, retirement packages, etc.

So what happens? The chinese will move their factories to the US, Japan, England, and so on! Our starving and uneducated populations will *want* these jobs, because its better than tending the rice patties, and everything will be A-O-K.

Now, in all seriousness, as far as I'm concerned, the Chinese and Indians deserve the success they are having right now. They're educated, and hard working. And we, we deserve to have our asses handed to us for our laziness and hubris. I just hope all this manages to happen without too much warfare.

Great (4, Funny)

Camel Pilot (78781) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200711)

Is outsourcing to North America part of their plan :)

Obligatory (-1, Redundant)

guiscard (712813) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200714)

I for one welcome...

Earth to Slashdot (0, Redundant)

govtcheez (524087) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200752)

If you feel the need to preface a joke with "obligatory", or "someone needed to say it", then please just assume someone's already said it. It's not going to be funny.

Re:Earth to Slashdot (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200850)

If you feel the need to preface a joke with "obligatory", or "someone needed to say it", then please just assume someone's already said it. It's not going to be funny.

I'm not sure everyone will appreciate your obligatory disclaimer denouncing long-running gags, but someone needed to say it.

Good on them (3, Insightful)

Staplerh (806722) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200716)

Makes sense.

India has gained global repute as a hub of software professionals while China is strong on computer hardware. Both countries' cheap and plentiful labor has undercut the tech industry in America and other Western countries through outsourcing.

Seems as if they're trading on the principle of 'comparative' advantage, something that makes perfect sense. Software in India, hardware in China. Now, I understand that we're going to see some misguided anti-Globalisation backlash on this site. Overall, firms will then get lower prices for their tech products. Everybody will win from this.

Re:Good on them (5, Insightful)

Seumas (6865) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200766)

Everybody will win from this.

Unless you are emloyed in America, making software or hardware for a living.

Please inform the masses on Slashdot how lowering the standard of living for those in say - America, Britain and elsewhere - is a winning situation.

Re:Good on them (5, Insightful)

0x461FAB0BD7D2 (812236) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200846)

Those in America and the UK, and other developed countries, are relatively better educated. As such, their occupational mobility is higher. Moreover, they have the chance to be creative without getting their hands dirty.

I've heard, on Slashdot no less, of Americans outsourcing their own work to India, pocketing the difference and spending their time at the desk learning. Specialization of labor has always worked, and may even be the reason we are where we are now [economist.com] .

Re:Good on them (2, Insightful)

millwall (622730) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200936)

Those in America and the UK, and other developed countries, are relatively better educated.

Than what countries? Let me remind you that India has got one of the best IT University degrees in the world. Was this really an educated comment?

As such, their occupational mobility is higher.

How is the educational level linked to the occupational mobility?

Re:Good on them (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200937)

We have data protection laws and human rights laws and so on, India does not yet your bank information is expected to be held there. I refuse to bank with any bank who pushes me to talk to Indian call centers with personal information. Look at the previous case of fraud and crime using said information.

Re:Good on them (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200835)

...uh... everyone from a selling standpoint wins except for the general populace that once depended on the earnings they once had to BUY the stuff these new lower-cost sellers offer... doesn't matter how low and competitive they become, when their production decisions affect economy of their consumers negatively, there will be increased supply, lower demand and a global market crash around the corner. The market improvments over the short term are attractive, but the long term results will be devastating. But that works out just fine for those people in control who would rather build up large amounts of cash with which to retire from the game and relax while the rest of the world wallows in misery.

Re:Good on them (1)

mr_z_beeblebrox (591077) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200855)

Overall, firms will then get lower prices for their tech products. Everybody will win from this.

Everybody wins except for non asian tech based companies or worse yet, non asian tech based economies. Sorry for their (our) luck.

Re:Good on them (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200912)

You are horribly ignorant if you think this is just about computers. India is a in an excellent position to bargin as the USA needs them to contain China and China doesn't want to have to deal with more American allies.

Unless you are a Communist backer wanting to bring Taiwan back into the fold you do not win with this arrangement, or any other, between these two countries.

Re:Good on them (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200942)

> misguided anti-Globalisation backlash

Not sure about misguided. Certainly, it would appear that in contrast to the first half of the 20th century, where people could work their way up from the bottom to the top of society, now it's all service industries and temporary work, where there's simply no hope of such a progression. Wouldn't that tend to cause conflict in society between the rich and the poor, with such effects as higher crime, drug use etc? Sure, it's good for business, who can get their products produced more cheaply, and have newer, poorer markets to sell into. Also, these poorer, emerging markets have to open their doors to heavily subsidized American products/markets (such as farming).

And now... (1, Funny)

DarthVeda (569302) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200717)

My substandard chinese parts can be serviced by substandard indian technicians!

Re:And now... (2, Funny)

0x461FAB0BD7D2 (812236) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200782)

...in order to post substandard comments and get a substandard karma.

Re:And now... (1)

JavaLord (680960) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200880)

Anytime you want to find the truth on slashdot, just look for the comments modded 'flamebait'

What did you expect? (1)

d_jedi (773213) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200727)

With Walmart getting into the computer business, and all..

It's true (-1, Redundant)

Oscaro (153645) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200730)

China and India should work together to dominate the world's tech industry, bringing together Chinese hardware with Indian software.

That's true. They could, and they should.

Re:It's true (2, Insightful)

gewalker (57809) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200876)

Yes, and the fact that China does not give a hoot regarding Intellectual Property and Copyright should not concern India in the least.

The immorality of Open Source (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200732)

Having read the article thoroughly, this startling news shows the flaws in the brewing Open Source Zeitgeist that is gripping the software community. Have you considered that providing software for free to countries such as China is essentially tacit support for oppressive regimes?

Far-fetched? Think about it: With MySQL, the People's Army will now be able to do multiple queries on their tables of democratic activists in Olog(n) time instead of lengthy searches in card catalogs. The bureaucratic overhead previously allowed activists enough time to flee the country. How about building cheap firewalls so the people can't get the unbiased reporting that CNN provides? Or using Apache to publish lists of Falun Gong people to their police forces instantly? I doubt that never crossed your minds when you were coding away in your parents' basements. Consider putting that little thought in your mental resolv.conf file.

If that does not concern you ( which it probably doesn't, since the slashdot.org paradigm is publishing articles about how not to pay for things ), consider something else. When China eventually goes to war with Taiwan, we want to be able turn their command and control facilities into the computing equivalent of a train-wreck. One of the advantages of Windows never mentioned in the article is the ability of Microsoft to remotely deactivate Windows XP in the case of a national emergency. Thanks to GNU/Lunix, Taiwan will be on a collision course with the mainland in the near future.

Which throws into question Mr. Stallman's motives. A known proponent of socialism, the Chinese government and RMS are natural allies. Could it be a back door to Stallman's dream of an über-Socialist United States? We may never know for sure. Next time you consider contributing to an open source project, ask yourself this question: don't you want to make sure your work isn't used for nefarious purposes? Will you risk having blood on your hands?

Re:The immorality of Open Source (2, Funny)

Seumas (6865) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200799)

Jonathan Scwhartz, is that you?

Re:The immorality of Open Source (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200809)

Far-fetched? Think about it: With MySQL, the Homeland Security Department will now be able to do multiple queries on their tables of democratic activists in Olog(n) time instead of lengthy searches in card catalogs. The bureaucratic overhead previously allowed activists enough time to flee the country. How about building cheap firewalls so the people can't get the reporting that other countries provide? Or using Apache to publish lists of abortion doctors to their Christian flocks instantly? I doubt that never crossed your minds when you were coding away in your parents' basements. Consider putting that little thought in your mental resolv.conf file.

So?

Re:The immorality of Open Source (1)

91degrees (207121) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200831)

Far-fetched? Think about it: With MySQL, the People's Army will now be able to do multiple queries on their tables of democratic activists in Olog(n) time instead of lengthy searches in card catalogs.

Don't know what you're doing, but mycard indexes can be searched this efficiently anyway.

The bureaucratic overhead previously allowed activists enough time to flee the country. How about building cheap firewalls so the people can't get the unbiased reporting that CNN provides?

But cheap firewalls can be bypassed with cheap proxy routing software.

Which throws into question Mr. Stallman's motives. A known proponent of socialism, the Chinese government and RMS are natural allies.

Not the case. RMS is a proponent of hippy style socialism. A socialism where academics get paid to academe, and workers toil for a tech meritocracy. China offers totalitarian socialism.

Re:The immorality of Open Source (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200902)

the ability of Microsoft to remotely deactivate Windows XP in the case of a national emergency.

Thats hilarious. You can be sure Russian hackers are standing by right this second to sniff the self-destruct sequence to replay whenever they want. Or are you going to tell me that Microsoft only sold this "feature" to American "enemies"? That the Chinese Pirates selling XP for a buck didn't rip that feature out along with the product activation? Of course, you ignore the fact that Microsoft cheerfully sold the product to "the enemy" in the first place, making your second paragraph a steaming pile of bullshit, since China's government would happily use XP+IIS+MS SQL to do those exact same things.

Re:The immorality of Open Source (1)

cowgoesmoo2004 (762366) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200905)

Sigh, this opinion is junk. You can't stand in front of progress and wish it away. Sorry Bill, you are rich enough, stop whining already!

Tech Support (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200739)

Great! Now we won't be able to understand in two different languages!

Hmm (4, Insightful)

Otter (3800) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200740)

The Taiwanese may be a little bit uneasy about which part of "China" this "Chinese hardware" is going to be coming from...

That said, the border agreement India and China announced today seems like a terrific step forward. I'm surprised it's not getting more attention. The two biggest countries in the world have been banging heads over that border for decades.

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200843)

Huh? Never heard of Russia and Canada arguing over the Indian-Chinese border...do you mind posting references?

Re:Hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200950)

Y'know, when I previewed I was about to reword that bit. But I figured, why deny some pedantic twat the chance to be a pedantic twat? HTH.

Re:Hmm (1)

postsingularity (874666) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200879)

I think that Taiwan would be more concerned about the call for investment from India in China especially given how bad the situation is between Taiwan and mainland China with their current level of interdependence.

Inevitable (5, Insightful)

0x461FAB0BD7D2 (812236) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200742)

Cooperation between India and China is inevitable. Their feud stems from a small war and dispute over small threads of land. The benefits of their cooperation is far greater than the benefits of a rift, and both sides have seen this. Add this to a burgeoning ASEAN, and you have a truly global economic power.

Whether or not they succeed at dominating the tech industry is redundant. If they cooperate, even economically, they'd have a lot more say in the world than the either the US or the EU, over time.

Re:Inevitable (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200861)

Whether or not they succeed at dominating the tech industry is redundant. If they cooperate, even economically, they'd have a lot more say in the world than the either the US or the EU, over time.

If they succeed, in time they might force North America into a "super NAFTA" or even a true North American Union.

Which is OK, since we can then lord it over in hockey against the alphabet countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile) of the South American Union.

Re:Inevitable (4, Insightful)

AppyPappy (64817) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200866)

The fight isn't over land. The fight is over control of SE Asia. India's military buildup makes China squirrely. This is especially true with India's lead in naval forces. India can project further out that China. In the absence of a war, that is a key asset in diplomacy.

China and India may pretend to get along as newlyweds but China's support of Pakistan's military is the porn stash in the closet.

Re:Inevitable (1)

0x461FAB0BD7D2 (812236) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200949)

Yes, it is true that both India and China have their relative spheres of influence in SE Asia. However, the potential benefit from fighting over these countries is far less than a 2-billion-strong free economic zone.

As India improves ties with Pakistan, and loses patience with America's support for a leader it sees as undemocratic, it realizes that it requires a strategic partner. With Russia on the decline, China is the obvious choice. Even though relations between Pakistan and China are rosy, this would change if Pakistan supports the US and Taiwan against China.

Pakistan is the wildcard here. However, it also stands the most to gain. If it stays out of any global bickering, it could improve relations with the US and India, while maintaining relations with China, opening up three huge markets.

Hmmm (2, Funny)

rudeboy1 (516023) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200749)

Isn't this where Peter Wiggin joins with the Thai army and defeats the Indo-Chinese alliance?

Re:Hmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200834)

After he recruits Julian Delphinki, yes. But then he must fight the Islamic Empire that merged with India (against china) and the russians who are invading china from the north.

From article... (0, Offtopic)

bopo (105833) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200751)


[pinky to mouth]Mwahahahahahahaha! Mwahahahahahahahahahahahaha![/pinky to mouth]

BBC World Comment (2, Informative)

Tibe (444675) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200758)

"China has a large manufacturing sector and India has a large software industry. China may become India's major manufacturer while India will be China's office" - BBC World (OR words to that effect)

My concern (1)

CdBee (742846) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200833)

(replying here due to vast wave of trolls and little else worthy of my time)

Any Indian software industry will almost certainly build its foundations on Linux rather than licence a proprietary OS.

I suspect certain parties *coughRedmondcough* may use this as an ideological reason to support Windows - "Running / Developing Linux is spporting our nation's strategic competitors - run an American OS !" etc.

Software and politics don't mix easily.

Re:My concern (1)

TheKidWho (705796) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200904)

I prefer OS X to linux... so sue me :D

In all seriousness though, I see a lot of Scientists in the US moving to OS X, its a much nicer Operating system for what we do then Linux.

The I Ching says ... (0, Offtopic)

foobsr (693224) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200765)

One should act in consonance with the way of heaven and earth, which is enduring and eternal. The superior man perseveres long in his course, adapts to the times, but remains firm in his direction and correct in his goals.

I wonder whether this goal is correct (feasible).

CC.

oh well (1)

Munk (59689) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200771)

I, for one, welcome our new Chindian Oveerrrr...oh wait...no I don't.

First they have to get off the reservations (4, Funny)

0kComputer (872064) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200772)

Why would indians want to get mixed up with the Chinese? Seems like this would jeopordize their lucrative Casino businesses.

Re:First they have to get off the reservations (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200947)

You got Insightful! You win.

Could be difficult... (1)

VernonNemitz (581327) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200776)

China and India are historical enemies for literally thousands of years. Sure, they might be able to bury the hatchet. But I think it will take a while....

Re:Could be difficult... (1)

DarkSarin (651985) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200838)

Yeah, bury the hatchet in each other skulls!

Actually, I know practically nothing about either culture, although I find both fascinating.

Re:Could be difficult... (1)

pstudent12 (842643) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200878)

China and India are historical enemies for literally thousands of years. Sure, they might be able to bury the hatchet. But I think it will take a while.. Nope. Gautam Buddha was an Indian Prince. Very influential in all of the far east.

Hmm... (0, Flamebait)

Avyakata (825132) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200777)

I wasn't aware that India was so technically advanced...

Lately a friend of mine's been complaining about how the tech support at her workplace has been outsourced to India. The reason she's unhappy is because they never really seem to understand much about technology...even when she does manage to contact someone who speaks non-broken English.

What great Indian software developments do the Chinese speak of?

Re:Hmm... (1)

jd142 (129673) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200865)

Because like everywhere in the world, front line tech support is a low paying job. You don't put your best people on phone support.

It's better than them lobbing nukes at each other (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200778)

In a century or two, perhaps they will taunt each other like the U.S. and Canada.

checks and balances (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200780)

Checks and balances are important. As more nations progress, the better off we all are.

Case in point, bush passing through unchecked.

Who writes the docs? (5, Funny)

lheal (86013) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200784)

Assembly Instruction of Very Fine Device.

Step 1: You should be opening the box now.

Step 2: Complete assembly is easy for you.

Step C: Begin use Very Fine Device.

Re:Who writes the docs? (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200933)

Step Final: All your base are belong to us!

Re:Who writes the docs? (2, Interesting)

foobsr (693224) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200966)

These tasks will be outsourced to the various native speakers of the countries that are ruled (technologywise) who will do it almost for free due to economical pressure. I am not sure, though, that this will lead to improved quality and do not hope for usefulness.

CC.

They'll fail. (1)

OwP_Fabricated (717195) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200787)

Between the combined political oppression and instability of the two countries they won't get terribly far if they attempt this sort of alliance.

China's setting itself up for a gigantic market crash anyway (which in turn will mess up the rest of the world). What SHOULD concern us is what's going to happen to China when it eventually collapses in on itself.

Whatever (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200806)

Chinese hardware is cheap and often unreliable, while indian software is second rate and often buggy. The computer industry needs to stay in America ala quality.

Is this related (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200808)

Is this related with the "best hackers are russian" story of yesterday?

Well... (1)

kun (844934) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200810)

I guess Taiwan's wonderful software engineers just have to feel left out of this new wonderful Asian century - but seriously.. India before the rest of South East Asia ? Can we hear [why yes - Singapore,Malaysia,Japan,Korea (both of them) - they are our misguided children .. and we will get them back.. oh yes.. we will.. *maniacal laughter*]

This is a good thing for us Americans! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200811)

No jobs, but cheaper goods to buy

There is simply no way... (2, Informative)

rhythmx (744978) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200817)

that China can compete with the U.S. Tech when we have the best [news.com] Math and Science schools on the planet. I mean, there is so much interest within the U.S. to keep up innovation and not just be technology whores. Besides, we've patented everything [slashdot.org] anyway.

I for one... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200828)

...salute our new Chindian overlords! ;)

Makes sense (1)

Professor_UNIX (867045) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200840)

India already dominates the outsourced help desk market. Cheap crappy Chinese hardware and sub-par Indian tech support should work well together to dominate the global market. :-/

Say China , what do you want to do tommorow night? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200852)

The same thing we do every night, India...

no need to worry if we unleash capitalism in usa (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200858)

IF our government would just release the breaks on our capitalist engine.. china and india could PLAN their economies and artificially divide themselves into hardware/software nations all they want.. but a more capitalist USA will run circles around them and they will just be working to sell us more shit in exchange for our higher order goods... but thats not going to happen.. capitalism is slowing down here.. we are going to kill ourselves to pay into a piece of shit social security and all kind of other socialist minded programs...

they're no dummies (5, Insightful)

dAzED1 (33635) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200900)

The gov of China knows that India is supposed to surpass them in population relatively soon. According to the CIA [cia.gov] , by 2020 (15 years, folks...) a China/India duo would account for 36% of the global population. Western Europe plus the United States will only be 9% of the global population. With emerging economies, it is forecasted that we westerners are supposed to become quite obsolete.

China, knowing that by 2030 india is predicted to pass them in population, knows they have to act. Most of China's land mass is worthless, after all (why do you think Tiawan is so important to them?) so they have to position themselves as a solid consumer front.

The problem India/China will face: they'll be *consumers*. Being the biggest consumers has been a major harm to the US economy (trade deficits, etc). For our substantially smaller work force (1/5th-ish), we still produce twice as much as China does (see above CIA link). They need to seriously work on their production per-capita. That, and feeding those folks is already a serious problem. Production, on their end, is not just an industrial issue - its a natural resource issue.

The Western Hemisphere controls the food, and with it...we'll still control the wealth. If the US made some strong ties with South America, we'd retain power with even just 2% of the global population...put 3 billion people in an area that can only make food for 1 billion, and what does supply/demand dictate? It dictates that food prices will skyrocket, and non-food goods will plummet. Watches and games will become trivial, throw-away items (already are), but an apple...an apple will be valuable.

Indian Software (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200903)

I don't see how they can dominate the world, from personal experience Indian software stinks. The worst programming I have ever seen came from Indian developers.

Brave New World (2, Funny)

TrebleJunkie (208060) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200909)


Welcome to a Brave New World of Tech Support Hell.

The plotline from "systemic shock"?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200911)

With the U.S. in some stupid semi-relgious dictatorship of sorts, a shattered Russia as a minor power, and the new Sino-ind alliance, one wonders if this is the plot from Dean Ing's systemic shock. All we are missing are the cool airships and a bit more liberal use of anthrax to wipe out the "blue" states in the east, and the other "blue states" to join Canada and Mexico...

And it might work.. (1)

EvilStein (414640) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200916)

Heck, we're sending so much R&D that way anyway, it was just a matter of time before this happened.

PHBs on the quest for low low prices will love this, too. They'll save the company money and come out with a huge bonus.

On the other hand... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200929)

They could combine Indian tech support with Chinese build quality and domainate the world with tech from hell!111one

Tech support? (1)

natron 2.0 (615149) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200934)

So will the tech support be outsourced to the US?

There are other partnership possibilities here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12200941)

I, for one, look forward to finishing my next curry with fortune cookies.

So basically... (3, Interesting)

suitepotato (863945) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200952)

...we buy cruddy unsupported hardware from China, we run horrendously unsupported software from India, and we have it fall prey to Russian hackers.

Am I the only one finding this to be a problem?

You know, there was once an old joke on a comparison of Heaven and Hell based on which nationality did your food, car, laws, lovers, etc. I think we're headed towards the same in IT.

I wonder what the South American FOSS contingent will have to say as time goes by or what influence the hacker high thing will have.

Probably just nationalistic chest beating but it is weird news.

Here's hoping... (1)

Peldor (639336) | more than 9 years ago | (#12200964)

...that the Indian Prime Minister replies that India will be much better served in partnering with a real hardware leader: Taiwan.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?