×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Testing Out Cell-Phone Viruses on a Prius

timothy posted more than 9 years ago | from the deep-underground-in-their-lair dept.

Worms 196

Mikko Hypponen writes "Couple of months ago there were rumours floating around that Bluetooth viruses could infect the on-board computers of some Lexus cars, or at least cause some visible effects on them. We took a Toyota Prius to an underground bunker and tested various Bluetooth mobile phone viruses and assorted Bluetooth attacks against the onboard computer. Results were somewhat surprising. It came as no surprise that we could not infect the car, but the Prius performed in the test even better than expected. No matter what we did the car did not react to the Bluetooth traffic at all. Cabir tried to send itself to the car and the car just did not allow the Bluetooth OBEX transfer to happen. Then, the whole car crashed (but not because of a virus)... Full story with pictures in our weblog."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

AAAAAAARRRRGGGHHHH!!! (0, Redundant)

GET THE FACTS! (850779) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483232)

fp! AGAIN!!!

FP! (-1, Offtopic)

Zlurg (591611) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483233)

woo hoo

Re:FP! (-1, Offtopic)

Zlurg (591611) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483258)

OMG I can't believe this worked. I now--OFFICIALLY--have too much freaking time on my hands.

And, for some reason, I give a crap about /., its prestige and the accompanying hordes of women that flock to a first-poster's side at the successful posting of the letter F and P (with an exclamation mark).

I don't know whether to shit or go bowling.

Re:FP! (0, Offtopic)

winkydink (650484) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483277)

Either one will be fine as I wouldn't expect that flock of women any time soon.

Re:FP! (1)

GET THE FACTS! (850779) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483269)

Nope, sorry. It was I who got first post, not you. The proof is in the p0sting. [slashdot.org]

You must be running Linux.

Well, that's good... (5, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483235)

Apart from the car crashing. Maybe a few less pints of Boddington's next time you head for the bunker, eh?

Re:Well, that's good... (1)

mekkab (133181) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483309)

Let's see... Cream of Manchester.... vs. Good Science practice... screw it. Science can wait.

I'll have a pint as soon as I get home (1 left!)

....Then the Whole car Crashed (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483236)

That's because they were doing 60mph!

HaHa

Serious Question (-1)

Neil Blender (555885) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483238)

Why would you want to intentionally fuck up your car's computer? Hacking a server is one thing, but hacking your car? That seems like want to test the fireproofing in your house.

Re:Serious Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483254)

Some cars are cheaper then some servers.

Re:Serious Question (4, Informative)

winkydink (650484) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483259)

RTFA. It wasn't their car. Toyota lent it to them.

Re:Serious Question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483289)

RTFA.

When I read "pictures in our weblog", I just assumed it would be slashdotted.

NB.

Interesting (1)

sheldon (2322) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483566)

Usually when I want to "test" a car, I call Enterprise.

Just make sure you get the insurance.

Re:Serious Question (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483292)

Why would you want to intentionally fuck up your car's computer?

Why did/do people make cars into hotrods?

Because it's there.

Because they can.

Next!

Re:Serious Question (3, Interesting)

douglips (513461) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483344)

You do realize that these people (F-Secure) are virus fighters? They intentionally infect all kinds of things all day long, so they can figure out how to cure them.

Re:Serious Question (1)

ggvaidya (747058) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483380)

Well, somebody's gotta test the stuff that's used in the fireproofing in your house, right?

That's what these guys are doing. They want to see if the rumors that Bluetooth virii can infect your car's computer are true.

MOD PARENT DOWN (1)

kkerwin (730626) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483418)

Please read the fine article, then post.

Re:MOD PARENT DOWN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483439)

You're new here, aren't you?

Re:MOD PARENT DOWN (1)

kkerwin (730626) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483725)

LOL

Too true, friend; the Slashdot community does have a problem with "comment first, ask questions later (if ever)". But a reminder every once in a while can help things (let us pray).

Re:Serious Question (1)

varmittang (849469) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483627)

um, the fire fighters do test out fireproofing by setting make shift houses on fire, just like these guys test out viruses on computers.

Still At Risk (5, Funny)

fembots (753724) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483243)

The article said "After intensive tests for all morning, the battery of the car was running low".

Does that mean that a similar DOS attack can disable most cars in a car park?

Re:Still At Risk (1)

promantek (866291) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483278)

Probably not, since the article says:

"After intensive tests for all morning, the battery of the car was running low!"

However, if a car was left with it's electronic equipment turned on (for a long period of time), it sounds like it could be possible. It's a very interesting idea to DOS a car...

Re:Still At Risk (5, Insightful)

RevDobbs (313888) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483310)

It's a very interesting idea to DOS a car.

A much easier to execute Denial-of-Service would be to slash the tires, doncha think? Only takes about 45 seconds to get to all four of 'em, it isn't terribly noisy, and I've never been caught doing it.

I mean, it seems like that detection would be very unlikely.

Re:Still At Risk (1)

promantek (866291) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483326)

It's all about the sophistication of your attack.

Sure, we could have nukes Iraq, but isn't it more fun to drop smart bombs guided by freakin' laser beams!?!?

Re:Still At Risk (1)

RevDobbs (313888) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483360)

Sophistication? I have a post with the term "OMFG" modded +5 Insightful... what's this "sophistication" you speak of?

Re:Still At Risk (2, Funny)

promantek (866291) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483405)

I guess the moderators are valley girls who shriek "Oh my gawd" while skipping together arm-in-arm wearing mini-skirts. Clearly, they find your OMFG comments insightful, but only after 90120 has gone on a commercial break.

that's sophistication, my friend.

Re:Still At Risk (2, Interesting)

Fishstick (150821) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483371)

I've always preferred removing the valve stems with a pair of cutting pliers, myself.

Yeah, it makes a nice whistling sound, but that is kinda the attraction too -- somewhere in the parking garage there are four whistles gradually becoming lower, quieter...

The victim walks out, sees four flats with no apparent damage *WTF*

Nothing as serious as having to buy 4x$120 tires, just aggravating to have to have someone come and repair the wheels onsite (esp in a parking garage where clearance will not permit a rollback trailer)

Re:Still At Risk (5, Interesting)

Samari711 (521187) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483552)

a better way to do this is to buy a valve tool at the local auto parts store. rather than do any permenant damage just loosen every tire's stem. Even if the owner could figure out why their tires are flat, they most likely won't have the tool on hand to fix it. even if they have a pump, the tires won't inflate and they'll be very confused. Also note that some car (especially those abominations known as Hummers) have tires that automatically inflate themselves, so doing this to one of them would result in a car with 4 flats and a dead battery :)

Re:Still At Risk (1)

sahrss (565657) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483477)

"A much easier to execute Denial-of-Service would be to slash the tires, doncha think? Only takes about 45 seconds to get to all four of 'em,..."

Well, yeah, except that one DOS unit in a parking garage that contained 10 bluetooth cars, could disable all 10, and is not detectable. :)

Re:Still At Risk (2, Insightful)

RevDobbs (313888) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483285)

Yes. Most cars in park with the key, accessories, and god know what else on -- but the engine not running -- will drain the battery eventually. It's called the "I locked my keys in the car"-DOS.

Re:Still At Risk (5, Funny)

Vellmont (569020) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483315)

Yes. This DOS attack has been known for quite a long time. It's only recently become known outside the hacker community. Some people even accidentally do it to themselves. Among laymen it's called "leaving your lights on".

Re:Still At Risk (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12484006)

Fortunately, many modern cars have an automatic power down mode, which switches off all headlights, etc. so now you need to 'leave the door open' to kill the battery... and in most locations 'leaving the door open' will result in 'the car driving itself to a chop shop'

Re:Still At Risk (1)

prodangle (552537) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483403)

The article said "After intensive tests for all morning, the battery of the car was running low". Does that mean that a similar DOS attack can disable most cars in a car park?

The car was underground, hence the engine would not have been running. All the car's electrical systems were in use all morning, with no alternator to keep the battery charged.

Just leaving the ignition switch at ready keeps lots of electrical systems in the car running, such as solendoids within the engine, cabin lights and dozens of sensors, not to mention the very clever looking TFT in that Prius. Bluetooth activity would have had negligible impact in draining the battery. Besides, in a car park all the cars would have their ignitions switched at off; bluetooth devices would not even be powered up.

Re:Still At Risk (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483468)

Just a note, the Prius does not actually have an alternator. The electric motor doubles as a generator, able to slow the car down without using the brakes by converting kinetic energy into current.

Re:Still At Risk--Prius power management (1)

klubar (591384) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483810)

Actually, the Prius has a very small aux (12 volt) battery. Generally, if the key* is in the all-power mode (but not the ready-mode), the engine will kick in every so often to charge the aux battery. The park lock does require power, so I suspect they were either in neutral (which will not charge the battery) or doing something else unusual with the car. The prius is very smart about power management and protecting the traction (main) battery and the 12V aux.

Permalink (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483248)

Permalink [f-secure.com]

Only works on the Lexus, not the Prius (3, Funny)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483252)

After all, cell phone virii only attack those who pay way too much for a car, without increased efficiency ...

Hmmm, maybe the Matrix is happening ...

Re:Only works on the Lexus, not the Prius (1)

sharkey (16670) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483359)

Hmmm, maybe the Matrix is happening ...

No, they said it was a Prius, not a Matrix [toyota.com] .

Re:Only works on the Lexus, not the Prius (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483410)

No, they said it was a Prius, not a Matrix.

I'll ask Joey (aka Honda in Japan).

He'll know what to do.

Maybe they could just buy a bigger battery? Or just stop playing the MP3 stereo at 11? Or turn off the neon undercarriage lighting?

Re:Only works on the Lexus, not the Prius (1)

MustardMan (52102) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483698)

Or turn off the neon undercarriage lighting?
It's a toyota prius, not a honda civic

Re:Only works on the Lexus, not the Prius (1)

Gadgetfreak (97865) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483643)

Don't forget that the option package that includes the DVD nav and Bluetooth phone capabilities is an additional $5065. [toyota.com]

Re:Only works on the Lexus, not the Prius (1)

zbuffered (125292) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483666)

Considering the notorious reliability of Lexuses (mine has 198,000+ miles and although I've replaced many ancillary parts [brake parts, power steering pump, starter, cv joint, little things]), I'd say that they're well-priced. You want overpriced and underperforming? Buy a Mercedes.

Error message (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483264)

...And the fact that the low battery is reported as a transmission problem is good how?

Sounds bad enough to me.

what a shitty error message (5, Insightful)

RevDobbs (313888) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483266)

Granted, the transmission may not be working -- but there should be a diagnostic saying "OMFG Battery Voltage Low" first. If you lost your arms in an industrial accident you don't start by telling the doctor that you have a hard time holding pens...

Re:what a shitty error message (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483475)

If you lost your arms in an industrial accident you don't start by telling the doctor that you have a hard time holding pens...

Of course not... I told him that I have a hard time holding my penis... so now I got a 23 year-old girl as my personal assistant... she performs all those things that I used to be able to perform.

Big Surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483279)

Why did they even need to test this? The Bluetooth on the Prius only acts as a BT headset, so until a virus can infect a headset Prius owners are safe.

Re:Big Surprise (1)

AdamWeeden (678591) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483955)

Had you read the article you'd realize you can send and recieve phone books between the car and phones.

hmm (0, Redundant)

834r9394557r011 (878286) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483283)

i think with the tons of money these car companies have and the fact that the computers in them are more proprietary than an old compaq, its no surprise that the viruses did nothing. With the amount of R&D cash on hand these guys have, i think they probably thought of that one.

Apocolypse Now! (2, Funny)

WankersRevenge (452399) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483284)

It came as no surprise that we could not infect the car, but the Prius performed in the test even better than expected.

We're all doomed! [imdb.com]

Re:Apocolypse Now! (1)

JoeCommodore (567479) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483821)

I don't believe in aliens coming down in spaceships... But this is another story [imdb.com] give you Weinermobile nightmares!

In other news... (4, Funny)

Bifurcati (699683) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483294)

Two bodies were found dead on the side of the road, apparently flung from a speeding vehicle. Satellite tracking followed the car as it drove itself, without driver, to a house in suburban San Diego. Police arrested 14 year old Neville Splink as he prepared to climb into the drivers seat with a modded Bluetooth enabled Playstation 2 running Linux and a copy of Gran Turismo 4. Neville could not be reached for comment, but sources say he couldn't believe how lucky he was that some idiots deliberately loaded his virus into their car. He had been expecting to have to take over their minds with their mobile phones first.

Police have warned all families with nerdy children to be on the look out for unexplained cars turning up in their garage.

Re:In other news... (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483469)

Two bodies were found dead on the side of the road, apparently flung from a speeding vehicle. Satellite tracking followed the car as it drove itself, without driver, to a house in suburban San Diego. Police arrested 14 year old Neville Splink as he prepared to climb into the drivers seat with a modded Bluetooth enabled Playstation 2 running Linux and a copy of Gran Turismo 4.

Hackers don't kill people while playing GTA: Seattle, insecure OS on People Personality Pleasure Pods (aka Cars For Families) kill people.

Remember, speed up before your jump over the University Street Bridge when it's going up, or you'll splash into the Ship Canal and your car won't work too well ... unless you have it fitted for Bluetooth Snorkel Option.

Virus that pummels users into submission (5, Insightful)

G4from128k (686170) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483318)

TFA, further down the page, describes the user experience of a Cabir infection. The recipient must click "yes" a number of times to accept the unknown transmission, install the unknown file, and bypass a security warning about installing something from an unverified supplier. Why do people click "yes" to all this? Because if you click "No" the virus keeps trying to install itself and pester you with the messages.

Definitely reminds me of "Abort/Retry/Fail" error message of so long ago. The first time you ever see the message, you hit "retry" a few times hoping it will work. Eventually, the computer teaches you to never try "retry" because it only puts up the error message again.

This virus is social engineering at its best, just like the whiny kid in the grocery store. Keep pestering until they say "yes."

Re:Virus that pummels users into submission (2, Interesting)

krbvroc1 (725200) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483411)

Firefox will do this too. I'll visit a site that says the security certificate is invalid, so I click 'deny'. The another certificate request pops up, ad-infinitum is seems. Since its a modal dialog you can't even close the web browser or close the 'tab' I'm browsing in. I end up either answering yes after examining the cert or kill via the task manager which closes not only that one site, but all all my open tabs.

Re:Virus that pummels users into submission (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483457)

Interesting. Did you file a bug?

Re:Virus that pummels users into submission (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483654)

No - I cannot determine exactly how to reproduce and it hasn't exceeded my annoyance threshold yet. By the time I get into the 'loop' and I kill the firefox task, I've forgotten what site I had surfed to.

Re:Virus that pummels users into submission (1)

thegamerformelyknown (868463) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483481)

I used to think this as well, until the other day at school when we were imaging computers (ie. copying the entire contents of a HD to the rest of the lab).

The computers are a few years old, and some of them have bad floppy drives. After a successful image, we needed to change each computers network id using a program called SID Changer off of a Floppy disk. On a few of the computers, the program would fail, giving the typical MS-DOS error (Abort/Retry/Fail). Frustrated, I hit r a bunch of times, and lo and behold, it worked. Testing this on a few other computers, I found this to work about half the time. Wow! Just goes to prove something we all thought was a joke isn't...

Re:Virus that pummels users into submission (1)

Seraphim1982 (813899) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483497)

Definitely reminds me of "Abort/Retry/Fail" error message of so long ago. The first time you ever see the message, you hit "retry" a few times hoping it will work. Eventually, the computer teaches you to never try "retry" because it only puts up the error message again.

I often found that the retry option was often very useful. In particular if I had a disk that was on its way out I often found it could take a lot of attempts before the computer would be able to read all the data off of the disk. Now, I don't know about you, but often the annoyance was worth getting the data off of my disk.

Re:Virus that pummels users into submission (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483595)

There is a simple fix:

It's called flood protection.

Simply auto-ignore the infected cell phone after too many atemps for a few minutes / hours, or allow the user to force ignore instead of just having yes/no as an option.

Re:Virus that pummels users into submission (1)

twostar (675002) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483733)

RTFA, only if you stay within the range of the infected phone. If you walk away it stops asking to install. So if you just walk by you'll get the message but then it stops. Just like the damn whiny kid, you leave him in the car and you don't have to worry about him pestering you to buy candy.

Re:Virus that pummels users into submission (1)

Doppler00 (534739) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483745)

If you are dumb enough to install a virus on your phone after getting all those warnings shown in those screenshots you should immediately return the phone and buy one of those cheap $50 phones. If you don't understand the core features of your phone, you have no business owning one just because it's expensive and looks high tech.

I can just imagine those antivirus companies love this. They'll be selling antivirus programs for your phone for a $30/year subscription.

Re:Virus that pummels users into submission (3, Insightful)

AdamWeeden (678591) | more than 9 years ago | (#12484001)

This virus is social engineering at its best, just like the whiny kid in the grocery store. Keep pestering until they say "yes."

Except that you can't take the virus to the frozen foods aisle and beat it with a loaf of frozen bread to get it to shut up. :)

Not Suprising, But still interesting (3, Interesting)

Xeroc (877174) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483324)

After all, the cell phones use Symbian OS, and the Prius (and Lexus) both do not use it, so it isn't very suprising that the virus wouldn't work. After all, you don't hear very often that a MS-Windows virus infects a Macintosh.

Also, I liked the apparent security features in the car, that it didn't react to the bluetooth traffic, but then again, this is probably just due to an inconpatiblility - i.e. the car won't except any type of data but a specific type, like a valid VCARD phone book.

Re:Not Suprising, But still interesting (1)

System.out.println() (755533) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483760)

After all, you don't hear very often that a MS-Windows virus infects a Macintosh.

I actually hear that all the time, it's just not true.

Re:Not Suprising, But still interesting (1)

Stevyn (691306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12484041)

and the layman who saw "Independence Day" might also think so. Somehow aliens use the same wireless network protocols and our viruses are binary compatible. I guess that damn i386 just never goes away.

After a while, it becomes aggravating how many people see something having to do with any high "tech mumbo jumbo" and assume it really is just "random mumbo jumbo" that somehow works most of the time.

A Trojan Horse (1)

thundercatslair (809424) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483346)

I wonder when someone will be able to install a trojan horse into a cars on board computer and disable important functions like, lets say braking remotely.

Re:A Trojan Horse (1)

EvilSporkMan (648878) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483458)

I work for a company that makes hardware and software to monitor vehicle networks, and one of my coworkers tells me one protocol (Onstar? I am NOT sure) has a message to disable the brakes.

Crazy (5, Interesting)

XFilesFMDS1013 (830724) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483364)

Reading the article, they're talking about going undergound in order to not effect any other cellphones in the area, and it stuck me as to how much is the same between a computer virus and a "physical" virus. I mean, scientists who work with e.g. bubonic plague, have to take the same cautions, i.e. not letting the virus out into the "wild", where it can spread. I suppose in a few years, many viruses will be tested like this, taking them into a underground bunker, putting them on a computer that has absolutly no connection to the outside world, and trying to find a cure for it. Then the geeks shall hold the true power.

Re:Crazy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483601)

That's how it works now in virus labs, except I doubt that most of them are underground...

Re:Crazy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483791)

i think those are called LANs

Next article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483387)

.... "They got this weird message on the phone, requesting a "Yes" or "No" answer. So they clicked "No". But the message popped up immediatly again. And they clicked "No" - only to see the message pop up again. And since "No" didn't seem to be working, they clicked "Yes"..."

Are people THAT stupid?

Re:Next article (1)

VoidWraith (797276) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483550)

Is it that hard to believe? You seem to have two choices, click yes, or stop using your mobile phone.

No (1)

he-sk (103163) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483610)

I mean, yes.

I am beginning to like the prius a lot (1)

swschrad (312009) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483389)

if I had cash, I'd get on the list for one now, frankly. they have done a lot of good things in a row with that machine, and toyota is very good about licensing their technology to other automakers. they did a techno-swap agreement with ford, and looks like the GM/DC combine is working on one now.

however, I strongly encourage everybody else to hate the car with a purple-veined passion, so when I do get into a position to.... errr, no, I just want you all to hate it. not saying why ;) starting about a year or two from now.......

Re:I am beginning to like the prius a lot (1)

Anonymous Freak (16973) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483516)

hehe.. In many dealerships, there are no waiting lists any more; nor do you have to pay extra. The trick is to hunt around, sometimes this means calling dealerships 200 miles away or more. But if you're persistent, you CAN get a Prius today, for MSRP. (There are even reports of people paying UNDER MSRP.)

Too late .... (1)

taniwha (70410) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483597)

I love mine .... best part is the car computer has easter eggs - now you can pull the 'engine codes' yourself sitting in the driver's seat and call them in to the dealer ....

Re:I am beginning to like the prius a lot (1)

Pfhor (40220) | more than 9 years ago | (#12484055)

Try central or western PA as a place to find Priuses.

Toyota sends out a set amount of cars to every dealership, even if one doesn't sell a single one and has to ship it to another dealership. Last march i could have driven 3 hours to pickup a fully loaded white prius in western PA if i wanted to, they had it sitting on the lot. The people who sign up for the car wont get called until their specific color comes in. If you take any color, you can get it fast (the toyota dealership around here had two white ones sitting on the lot with no buyers).

Rebooting the car... (4, Funny)

gambit3 (463693) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483396)


Does anyone else feel disturbed by that statement?

We waited hesistantly a moment, turned ignition off and rebooted the car...

Re:Rebooting the car... (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483441)

Does anyone else feel disturbed by that statement?

Well, since MSFT wants to provide the OS for onboard electronics, soon you'll get a Red Screen of Death ...

Re:Rebooting the car... (4, Interesting)

taniwha (70410) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483630)

well given that the Prius doesn't have a traditional key, just a key-fob that identofies you and an 'on' button it is a lot like rebooting a PC - to be fair they probably didn't push 'reset' (there isn't one) just turned it off then on again

Funny, the same thing happened... (5, Funny)

ctl4u (12243) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483429)

With my 1979 Toyota Camry no matter what bluetooth signals I sent there was no response. Needless to say, I was shocked!

Re:Funny, the same thing happened... (1)

whiteranger99x (235024) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483563)

Dude, I know what you mean. I have a 1991 Ford Tempo and despite all the available AM and FM signals, I can't get any reception. Of course, the radio was ripped out of the car. I'll have to see if it's can take bluetooth signals

Re:Funny, the same thing happened... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483913)

Considering the Camry was first released in 1983, I'm not surprised that your 1979 version failed to show a response. </partypooper>

LEARN HOW TO DO ANYTHING -- THE HOW TO WIKI (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483456)

WannaWiki [wannawiki.com]

KITT (4, Funny)

thanjee (263266) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483460)

Did KITT ever get a virus?

If he ever got sick it would have been that he was just sick of having David Hasselhoff hanging around all the time.

Happened in one episode (sort of) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483803)

Actualy, there was an episode (don't remember the name, dang!) where a hacker used a voice changer to trick KITT into thinking she was Bonnie (the tech who maintains KITT's systems). When KITT let her inside, she plugged a catridge into it's system that enabled hackers to mess with it's personaly, and turn against Michael Knight.

BTW: KITT's new alter ego and voice was far more menacing than KARR. Scary!

Re:KITT (1)

KingSkippus (799657) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483855)

KITT had two very hot "doctors" dedicated to keeping him well and in shape. Remember Bonnie and April [imdb.com] ?

In other news (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483499)

Our Procter-Silex Blender proves invunerable to all known TCP/IP exploits. Try as we might, we couldn't DDOS it. And it blended some superb margaritas to boot.

I'm not impressed (1)

tool462 (677306) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483592)

No matter what we did the car did not react to the Bluetooth traffic at all.
Meh. My car doesn't respond to Bluetooth traffic either. :shrug:

Toyota should expand its business... (2, Funny)

guardiangod (880192) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483611)

into the cellphone industry.

They have done the impossible: they created a bluetooth system that no virus in existant can infect.

Microsoft, are you listening?

God I think I will feel much safer knowing that my cellphone (and probably my comp's OS) is made by Toyota.

Re:Toyota should expand its business... (1)

roadrunnerro (800862) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483972)

Um... I think the Prius is already running a variant of Windows CE/Mobile...

Interesting... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483625)

Tell me more about this underground lair

Non-M$ car (2, Funny)

kihjin (866070) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483631)

Obviously this test was not sponsored by Microsoft [slashdot.org] .

I eagerly await the next article (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483645)

Where they show how to infect Herbie the Love Bug

Crashed? (2, Insightful)

SleepyHappyDoc (813919) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483657)

Perhaps it's time to find a less ambiguous word to describe a system failure. I'm sure I wasn't the only one whose first glance at the article caught a much different meaning than was intended. Crash works fine in contexts where it doesn't already have a use, but when you refer to cars or planes, it does.

The item I liked ... (3, Funny)

jc42 (318812) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483669)

... was the story from the guy whose cell phone caught the cabir virus, and his phone company's solution was to throw it away and buy a new phone.

Now I'm going to be expecting to hear that Microsoft has adopted this approach (and PHBs are ordering their people to do it) ...

Not terribly meaningful (4, Interesting)

subStance (618153) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483751)

I'm no professional scientist, but it was my understanding that in order to prove something was not true, you have to demonstrate why it can never happen, not that it doesn't happen on a single car that you test it on.

There must be hundreds of different versions of the car's software that have varying levels of resilience to the virus.

I can't wait to see the follow up ... "Why Windows never crashes: we tested and it didn't so it never crashes okay ?" No trouble getting funding for that study from Redmond.

Dumb and dumber... (4, Funny)

ArrayIndexOutOfBound (694797) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483752)

This is really good, you guys are killing me.

Trying to infect Prius with a Symbian "virus" is like trying to infect a tree with a choc chip cookie . Hey I can come up with a better one - it's like trying to infect shampoo with a book on eating disorders (now go picture that in your head for a second).

I won't go into debunking this as I have already done that (http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=137390&cid=11 486620 [slashdot.org] ).

But this is so sweet - it takes one dumb kid with too much time on their hands and one even dumber kid to moderate at voila! you get slashdot "news".

Don't you love it!

Q: How to make a totaly virus proof Bluetooth? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#12483814)

A: Break the antenna off

haha (1)

harlemjoe (304815) | more than 9 years ago | (#12483820)

how about if they got a BSOD
or an RSOD [slashdot.org] ?
Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?