×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Nissan Unveils All-Electric LEAF

kdawson posted more than 4 years ago | from the made-right-here-in-the-U-S-of-A dept.

Transportation 586

MojoRilla writes "In Japan, Nissan unveiled their all-electric LEAF (press release, and Flash site). Slated to launch in late 2010 in Japan, the US, and Europe, this car will have a 100-mile range, seats 5, has an advanced computer system with remote control by IPhone, and promises to be competitively priced. While this car's range won't work for everyone, it could be a game changer as a commuter car." Recharge time is 8 hours with a 200-volt power source, and "just under 30 minutes with a quick charger" (no further details given) to charge to 80% of capacity.

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

586 comments

call me old-fashioned (2, Funny)

Trepidity (597) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922187)

But I prefer my leaves unelectrified.

Re:call me old-fashioned (0)

drougie (36782) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922217)

not too funny but nice uid

Re:call me old-fashioned (0)

Trepidity (597) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922231)

Yeah it was the obvious joke, but I rarely get into threads early enough to post the obvious joke, so eh, took it this time. =]

Battery. (1)

gd2shoe (747932) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922613)

Speaking of the obvious:

all-electric ... car will have a 100-mile range,...

In other words, it will have a 60 mile range when it's fresh off the lot, and a 30 mile range after the first few months.

Let's be honest, this is combining an industry that habitually lies about fuel economy with batter tech (Laptop manufacturers are regarded as always lying about these.).

Re:call me old-fashioned (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922459)

I'm waiting until they can actually use photosynthesis. Until then, this is just STEMS and SEEDS as far as I'm concerned.

Nothing to see here, move along... (4, Informative)

Fishmoney (954814) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922203)

From TFA: "An iPhone application allows for remote monitoring of battery levels and control of air conditioning in electric cars"

This just in (4, Funny)

kpainter (901021) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922249)

Apple's iTunes app store bans Nissan's iPhone application allows for remote monitoring of battery levels and control of air conditioning in electric cars.

Re:Nothing to see here, move along... (4, Interesting)

TinBromide (921574) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922267)

Yeah, I was expecting the more recent pierce brosnan bond type cell phone remote, not this "Oh, my car has finished charging, I can leave this god-awful mall" type app. At least give me something that will use gps that I can log into and use as a lo-jack so my iphone can point me to my car in a big big parking lot.

Before anyone panics (4, Informative)

Brian Gordon (987471) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922207)

The "remote control" just lets you check if it's charged, and lets you start the AC/heat early to get the cabin comfortable while it's still plugged in.

Re:Before anyone panics (2, Funny)

kpainter (901021) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922287)

That and if it isn't charged, provides a helpful "You aren't going fucking anywhere, dude" message to indicate that the charge level is insufficient.

Re:Before anyone panics (1)

martas (1439879) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922539)

oh. and here i thought it was a james bond-esque RC car, with missiles, and spikes, and the whole nine yards.

Re:Before anyone panics (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922699)

point is..
if GE doesnt get off thier ass and start doing something worth a damn.. like it looks like nissan is here.. they are as good as useless anyway.

WORTHLESS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922211)

with no backup gas engine or generator addon. like anyone is going to buy TWO cars.

on the road charging? (4, Interesting)

Dare nMc (468959) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922497)

I was wondering if I could do the same thing I have for camping trips. I have a front and rear receiver hitch, and a 220V generator on a mount that slides into the receiver hitch. It's 5 hp, and runs a RV air conditioner for 5 hours on under 5 gallons, I am sure you could do a better generator mount than this guy [joe-ks.com] if we get a hitch mount, and just plug the car charger into it for road trips, ditch the weight for in town. Hopefully the chargers aren't locked out while moving. Not only does the GEN not have to meet as many emissions standards ( = cheaper) but has other uses also.

Re:on the road charging? (5, Funny)

scotch (102596) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922749)

Not only does the GEN not have to meet as many emissions standards

That's the spirit!!

100 miles with or without A/C? (4, Insightful)

mi (197448) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922219)

In a slowly-moving traffic, a running A/C will really eat into battery life... Somebody working, say, 40 miles from home — not that unusual — will need the charge to last 80 miles plus whatever extra for the air conditioning... Depending on how hot it is, they may or may not be able to pick kids from school on the way home...

Unless it is really cheap, I don't see, why many people would rush to buy it. "Normal" cars last about 300 miles and can be "recharged" (to 100%) in 3 minutes, instead of 80% in 30...

Re:100 miles with or without A/C? (4, Insightful)

FlyingSquidStudios (1031284) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922341)

I don't see, why many people would rush to buy it.

The millions of people who have short commutes who live in urban areas would do just fine with a car like this and many people like the idea of not just driving without relying on oil, but also not contributing to their city's level of smog.

I just wish I knew how much this thing costs.

Re:100 miles with or without A/C? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922513)

many people like the idea of not just driving without relying on oil, but also not contributing to their city's level of smog.

And just where do you think the power comes from when you plug into the wall?

Switching from having gas cars to coal cars is probably a net gain, but not as much as the "zero emissions" advocates would have you believe.
Not until we get our collective heads out of our asses and start building nuclear plants anyway.

Re:100 miles with or without A/C? (2, Informative)

FlyingSquidStudios (1031284) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922583)

In my city's case, the power comes mostly from natural gas and nuclear with some hydroelectric, so it's the cars that are the problem.

Re:100 miles with or without A/C? (3, Insightful)

AuMatar (183847) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922547)

Not really. I live in an urban area (Seattle). I even take public transit most days. I wouldn't even consider switching my gas car for a car like this.

1)I don't have an outlet in my parking space. Not even the home one, much less at lots near work. Most people in dense urban areas don't.

1a)I don't always park at home even over night. Sometimes I'm at a girlfriend's, sometimes I'm at a hotel in another city. Neither would have an outlet even if I had one in #1.

2)When there's an accident on a bridge, I can take 2 hours to drive home. I wouldn't trust it to keep a charge for that long idling.

3)I want the option of being able to drive farther. I want to be able to drive an hour or two out of the city on a weekend, or take a road trip. This car doesn't have that. So I'll need another car anyway. I don't have room for two in my garage. So add 100-150 a month for a parking spot to the price.

4)I don't always drive to work. Occasionally I drive to work (20 mi), to a concert venue after work (40 mi), then home (30 mi). That's cutting it too close.

5)I'm forgetful. If I forgot for even 1 evening to plug it in I'd be in trouble. That's not acceptable. It needs to be able to go at least a week without plugging in.

Most of these can be solved in time with range, but 100 mi is far too slow. It needs to be at least triple that. I'd prefer 500 mi, so I can take it on a real road trip. The other issue is availability of charging. A car like this needs extensive infrastructure that just doesn't exist. The only viable solution is to make it rechargable on the go- removable batteries or the like.

It's an interesting step, but as is it's useless. Get back to me when they have the infrastructure solved and the range increased.

No kidding! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922355)

New technology is for chumps. I can think of a billion things that are different with this car, so I am not even going to consider it. And get off my lawn!

Re:100 miles with or without A/C? (-1, Flamebait)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922501)

Why, these new cars only go 15 mph! The tires bust all of the time, and you have to put in gas and maintain them. Tell me, who is going to build all of these fueling stations! It's ridiculous! I'm sticking with my horse... reliable, inexpensive, trustworthy...

But seriously, 40 mile commutes are above average. You can plug it in at work if you really have to, and it's still going to be far cheaper than gas.

As I've said elsewhere, I imagine companies will be selling outlet metering devices within months of the sale of the first mass produced EV. As soon as they reach critical mass, charging stations will be more ubiquitous than gas stations. But you can stick with the horse and buggy as long as you like.

Re:100 miles with or without A/C? (1)

Dare nMc (468959) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922679)

and it's still going to be far cheaper than gas.

references? for all contenders so far, the battery cost alone drive the cost higher than gas (IE find the real cost of batterys divide by miles the are expected to last). With diesel smart cars getting 50 mpg= 2000 Gallons per 100k miles, you'll have to find me a battery under 5000 dollars that will last (and is in production and real today)? Although lead acid golf cart batterys might be close, those gives up almost 1/2 the energy, and thus costs more to operate than a gasoline car.
Don't get me wrong, their will be many markets this works out, like mail delivery, etc that are 5 minutes stops, etc that would be more convenient with all electric.

Re:100 miles with or without A/C? (1)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922787)

You assume that gas will remain at it's current price. This is wish thinking.

The battery is laminated lithion-ion, not from golf carts, slated to be at 80% after 7 years or 50k miles. Given that the car is going to cost 25-30k, I doubt it will cost more than 5k to recycle the batteries, and by then, you may get extended range as a nice bonus with new battery tech.

http://www.greencarcongress.com/2008/05/aesc-lithium-io.html [greencarcongress.com]

http://www.ecoworld.com/fuels/electric-car-cost-per-mile.html [ecoworld.com]

Re:100 miles with or without A/C? (1)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922549)

I wonder why more of these electric cars are not also offering solar like the Prius to help with the heavier power draws like the AC units.

Re:100 miles with or without A/C? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922675)

Because solar doesn't provide shit for power without a huge surface area. The stuff in the Prius just powers some ventilation fans to keep the air circulating when you're not in the car. That is a huge waste of money in any kind of car scenario.

100 mile range is not necessarily a problem (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922693)

I only drive about 100 miles per week on average. A rechargable electric car would not only do the job in this case, but it could be particularly helpful during the winter. As it is, I have to drive around randomly sometimes just to get the engine warmed up and get rid of the moisture that collects in it. My commute is too short for an ICE in cold weather.

Of course, the other side of the coin is.. for someone who doesn't drive a great distance an electric car is unlikely to be cost effective. And the turd-on-wheels styling and OMGiphone gimmick don't make this particularly appealing.

Re:100 miles with or without A/C? (1, Insightful)

Aurisor (932566) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922777)

Contrary to popular opinion, human beings were able to exist prior to air conditioning.

This puts the lie to the H-1B program. (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922229)

The Japanese, as a matter of national policy, do not hire engineers who lack Japanese citizenship. The engineers at Nissan are Japanese.

Yet, if we buy the nonsense sold by the American companies like Sun and Intel, Japanese companies cannot innovate unless they hire foreign engineers. Intel managers use this lie to convince the American Congress to open the floodgates on H-1B engineers.

Well, look at this electric car. It is designed 100% by Japanese engineers.

Now, look at the SPARC64. It is designed 100% by Japanese engineers (at Fujitsu) and so severely crushed the performance of Sun's Rock that Sun cancelled Rock. Rock is designed by mostly engineers who hold or once held H-1B visas.

Re:This puts the lie to the H-1B program. (0, Flamebait)

amiga3D (567632) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922399)

Did you bother to read that muddled up mess before you hit submit? you really shouldn't post while you're under the influence.

Re:This puts the lie to the H-1B program. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922723)

The Japanese, as a matter of national policy, do not hire engineers who lack Japanese citizenship. The engineers at Nissan are Japanese.

Um, I'm an engineer, and I'm in Japan, and I'm working for a Japanese company despite my American nationality. Watch it before you make such blanket statements. ;-)

Re:This puts the lie to the H-1B program. (3, Funny)

scotch (102596) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922783)

Um, I'm an engineer, and I'm in Japan, and I'm working for a Japanese company despite my American nationality. Watch it before you make such blanket statements. ;-)

Liar. If you live in Japan, tell me what Mothra is doing right now.

Thought so.

Re:This puts the lie to the H-1B program. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922735)

um, im an american engineer and i work at a japanese company in japan...

Re:This puts the lie to the H-1B program. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922771)

Yet, if we buy the nonsense sold by the American companies like Sun and Intel, Japanese companies cannot innovate unless they hire foreign engineers. Intel managers use this lie to convince the American Congress to open the floodgates on H-1B engineers.

It's not a lie, you just have to read between the lines. When ever an American company says "foreign", they're saying "not American". It all makes sense if you just make that substitution.

Re:This puts the lie to the H-1B program. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922775)

Sounds to me like we need to issue more of those H-1B visas so we can get some of those Japanese engineers to work for our companies.

Pwnage in 3..2..1.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922245)

"has an advanced computer system with remote control by iPhone"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dddAi8FF3F4

History (1)

sys.stdout.write (1551563) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922273)

Remember when Chevrolet announced that they were going to release the Volt, a similar all-electric car?

Of course, the climate (chuckle chuckle) has changed in the industry so we'll see. But still, I'll believe it when I see it actually go into manufacturing.

Re:History (1)

JordanL (886154) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922327)

Chevy is still releasing the Volt in 2010, and they already have one plant in the process of being converted to Volt-only production.

Re:History (5, Informative)

David Greene (463) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922381)

The Volt is not a BEV, it is an EREV. That is, the Volt is a plug-in series hybrid that uses a small gas engine to drive the electrical system (somewhat like a diesel-electric locomotive except with gasoline). The goal is to run all-electric for 40 miles (covering 75% of commuters) and kick in the gas engine when the battery gets low enough.

And it appears to be on schedule for 2010. More info here [gm-volt.com] and here [chevrolet.com] .

Sigh. Chevy Volt battery is still too small. (1)

Ungrounded Lightning (62228) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922761)

They need a big enough battery to recycle the energy from coming down from a mountain pass to go up the next pass (a longer-range analog of recycling power from a full stop for the next start and acceleration) or cruise across the valley. That will also get a range in excess of a hundred miles on the level and in city traffic.

Do this, with enough engine plus electric horsepower to maintain highway speed up a mountain road, and you've got a car that can fully replace a gasoliine vehicle.

Let's remember a few things for this discussion: (4, Interesting)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922277)

1) There is already enough juice in the grid at night to power 80% of the 220 million cars without any further need for more power plants. (According to the DoE) [autobloggreen.com] .

2) The average commute for people is far less than 100 miles, which means the only thing you could be missing out on is a truck for hauling or a car for road trip vacations.

Now, the price hasn't been released. If it's under 30K, it's a winner. As the summary said, there's no details on the charge, but as long as I can plug it in at night and it's charged in the morning, it will not only save me gas, but I don't have to bother with filling up.

Re:Let's remember a few things for this discussion (4, Insightful)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922345)

Hm, but how many people drive with no electronics? No AC, no heat, etc? A 30-40 mile commute isn't unheard of (in fact its very typical) where I live, and it tends to be very hot in the summer and very cold in the winter, so that is 60-80 miles both ways, every day. Lets mix in the fact that heat (has to be electric thus running down the battery) or AC (also electric) is going to without a doubt cut down on the battery's life, making it uncertain if you can make it any other place (such as to pick up your kids, run and grab some groceries, etc) without taking it home to charge. However, what I think is the worst part about electric vehicles is there is no easy way to get started if you get stranded. Its happened to all of us, either you forgot to get gas, or the gas gauge was inaccurate, but you run out of gas. Most of the time its not a huge problem. Just call up someone and have them bring a bit of gas to make it to the next gas station, but how are you going to move that electric car? Its unfeasible to just call up someone to lug 100 pounds + of batteries to you, and solar just isn't efficient/fast enough to charge it.

FUD (-1, Flamebait)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922417)

Nice FUD.

However, if their employer allows them to plug in their car, problem solved. I'm sure some companies will be offering outlet metering devices within months of the release of the first batch of mass manufactured electric cars.

As electric vehicles become more commonplace, your local DOT will probably have a few hundred pounds of batteries on board and charge up your car enough to get home or to the nearest charging station.

Sure, the first adopters may have some weird problems. But they don't have to change the oil, they probably won't have a transmission to worry about, and they are going to save a ton of money on fuel costs, not counting tax credits. But being stranded? Come on, man. You're really grasping at straws there.

Re:Let's remember a few things for this discussion (1)

Kral_Blbec (1201285) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922471)

Heating and AC only are a problem on the return trip as you can have it start heating/cooling while still in your garage at home. The biggest draw is going to be getting to the set point temp, keeping it there is relatively easy after the first few minutes. The option of having a trickle charge solar panel on some models would really be nice to help recharge while at work. It might not get to 80%, but the 8 hours you are at work it could at least get something.

Here's a clue (1)

Chuck Chunder (21021) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922647)

Just because it isn't appropriate for your use case doesn't mean there aren't a lot of people who it is appropriate for.

Re:Let's remember a few things for this discussion (2, Interesting)

russotto (537200) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922415)

1) There is already enough juice in the grid at night to power 80% of the 220 million cars without any further need for more power plants.

You might want to double-check those figures before accepting them as gospel. They're not assuming charging at night; they're assuming that any and all excess non-peaking capacity in the electrical grid is used to charge the cars. This is wildly unrealistic and provides only a best-case figure. Basically they're saying that if you ran every coal plant in the country balls-out at all times, you could provide power to 180 million cars... average. In the summer and winter less, in the fall and spring more.

From the report:
"The valley-filling methodology is predicated on the notion that the entire PHEV load is managed to fit perfectly into the valley without setting new peaks."

Re:Let's remember a few things for this discussion (3, Insightful)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922819)

So, I'm 50% wrong, and out of the box we can only charge 90 million cars. Or I'm 75% wrong and it's 45 million. Or I'm 90% wrong, and we can only immediately put 22 million EVs on the road.

Can you give up on progress and go back to whittling wooden crucifixes where you don't have access to a computer? Jesus fucking Christ. I've never run into so many absolutely stupid and cynical naysayers. Just give up and die already, and at least leave more oxygen unmolested.

Re:Let's remember a few things for this discussion (4, Insightful)

Wrath0fb0b (302444) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922515)

Let's remember some other things that I think are relevant to the discussion. Or really just one thing: Amdahl's law http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amdahl's_law [wikipedia.org] , which I think is woefully ignored in the green-car world. As an result-oriented environmentalist, this disappoints me immensely.

In short, Amdahl's law says that when you want to improve a system that is made up of lots of different components, you do best to improve the lowest-performing part first. In programming, that means focusing your performance analysis on the parts of the program that are taking the most time before you focus on making the fast parts faster. In terms of automobiles, that means you should replace the most fuel-guzzling part of the fleet before you start thinking about making the thrifty cars thriftier.

Let's do some numbers, for the same number of miles driven, replacing a 12 mpg vehicle with a 15 mpg vehicle saves you as much as replacing a 30 MPG vehicle with a 60 MPG vehicle. Improve that 12 mpg to 18 mpg and now you need to replace a 30 mpg with a 180 MPG car (the EPA calculates the carbon-cost of an electric vehicle using our mix of power source to be roughly 120 mpg) to match the fuel savings.

So if we were really serious about making a dent in oil consumption and CO2, we would be pushing for more fuel-efficient pickup trucks, cargo vans and SUVs instead of this inane (but highly press-friendly!) pursuit of ever-more-efficient small vehicles. The people that drive those vehicles can't or won't replace them with small cars no matter how efficient.

Ultimately, it comes down to whether we value results or whether we value cool technology. As a gadget-nerd, I freely admit that all-electric cars are much sexier than a new pickup truck that gets 16 mpg instead of 12. But the programmer inside me knows that the pickup truck will probably do a lot more good over the lifetime of the vehicle. There are only so many R&D dollars going around and I feel like they aren't being well spent (from the point of view of the environment -- for marketing, the halo effect of the Prius is definitely worth it).

Re:Let's remember a few things for this discussion (1)

psycho12345 (1134609) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922639)

Did you miss that the government is doing just that? In fact it was so popular to do that (replace the old inefficient SUV, etc.) that the program subsidizing it ran out of money?

Math? (1, Insightful)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922673)

Lets say my commute is 60 miles. You're saying that improving a 30mpg to a 60mpg vehicle, which halves the gas usage, is the same as a 12mpg to a 15mpg, which does nowhere near that kind of improvement?

60/12=5
60/15=4

60/30=2
60/60=1

And then you state:

180/12=12 to 180/18=10
is a greater improvement than
180/30=6 to 180/180=1

What kind of math is this?

The problem, of course, is moving freight around. Rail is insanely more efficient than any other method available. And no, your pickup truck is going to be used for commuting 95% of the time, so over it's lifetime, you will have the worst vehicle for your situation 19 out of every 20 times you use it.

Re:Let's remember a few things for this discussion (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922587)

Ya, cool...that's nice and all. But could someone please tell me where the apartment dwellers are supposed to charge their cars at? Unless there's some sort of metered charging pole (via credit card swipe), I doubt they will let us leech for free. Also, will there be charging poles at designated parking areas while at the office?

I'm not opposed to electric vehicles, but there is some serious down-to-earth questions that need answered first.

Re:Let's remember a few things for this discussion (4, Insightful)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922709)

The metered outlets will be installed by a third party and offered as an amenity. It's just like when internet started in apartments first. You install one EV Charge Parking Spot, and you have ten times as many potential customers driving by it every day.

Again, once there's an inexpensive, safe, reliable EV that goes 100 miles on a single charge, all other problems become trivial to solve.

Re:Let's remember a few things for this discussion (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922779)

I wouldn't exactly call adhering to the National Electrical Code and Fire Code to be something trivial. Planning and routing conduit for 220v and maintaining public safety is not to be scoffed at.

Doable? Sure. Trivial? Hell no!!!

Cost (1)

jnnnnn (1079877) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922645)

From the Age article [theage.com.au] :

Mr Palmer said the Leaf, excluding its battery pack, would cost the equivalent of a small family car, and the company planned to enter into a multiple-year lease of its special lithium-ion battery pack with its first customers.

Sounds like they're trying to make it affordable, let's hope they do. I for one would really enjoy smog-free cities.

Hell, It's about time... (1)

sircastor (1051070) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922281)

I've been waiting for a serious announcement from a major automaker for a long long time. Where do I sign up?

sign me up! (4, Interesting)

SethJohnson (112166) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922283)



If this car is less than $22k, I will buy one day-of-release. TFPR does not provide an MSRP, but it does say it will be low-priced. Four doors, and your gas bill gets moved over to your house electric bill. I never drive more than 100 miles in a day, so it would be perfect for getting me around town on all my stop-start errands.

Moving the cost of driving from a fuel purchase tracked with credit card might make it more difficult for people to get reimbursed by their company for business driving. I wonder how that's going to get sorted. Also, in a roommate situation, it becomes a little unfair to evenly split the electric bill if only one tennant is charging a car.

Looks cool.

Seth

Re:sign me up! (1)

glitch23 (557124) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922479)

Also, in a roommate situation, it becomes a little unfair to evenly split the electric bill if only one tennant [sic] is charging a car.

Then don't split it evenly. If you already have a roommate and then acquire the car then you'll easily be able to determine what the added cost will be for charging the car, otherwise just split the bill appropriately. It should be possible to calculate the kw/hour used for charging the car that you can do the math once you get the bill.

Re:sign me up! (1)

socsoc (1116769) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922509)

Looks cool.

Did you click through to the Flash site? Maybe you don't have flash enabled...

It looks worse than Nissan's answer to the Scion xB, the Cube.

Where's the Outlet? (1)

Macrat (638047) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922315)

Not everyone owns a house with a handy electrical outlet available.

A little hard to plug in at a condo car port or an apartment parking lot.

Re:Where's the Outlet? (1)

fenix849 (1009013) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922437)

On the end of the extension cord you dangle from your third floor window, duh!

Even better would be a motorised reel, you could make it from Lego technic or harvested bits from an elcheapo rc helicopter.

Re:Where's the Outlet? (1)

grassy_knoll (412409) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922441)

Perhaps a bit of a random thought, but for apartment / condo car ports if they were roofed with something similar to what BP gas stations use [solarpowerauthority.com] it might help with recharging.

Re:Where's the Outlet? (4, Insightful)

QuantumG (50515) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922445)

Not everyone owns a swimming pool.. are you suggesting people should stop making diving boards?

Not everything is about you.

Re:Where's the Outlet? (1)

Macrat (638047) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922711)

Not everyone owns a swimming pool.. are you suggesting people should stop making diving boards?

Not everything is about you.

I live in a condo AND an apartment?

Remember internet access? (1)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922461)

Apartments were one of the first spots with internet access, because you could run a few lines and connect up a few hundred people.

Likewise, some company will be offering a cut of metered electric service to the apartment complexes, and they'll be able to list "EV Charging Spots" as an amenity to the apartment.

Really, once an electric car is mass produced, inexpensive, and safe, the rest of the problems that come up are completely trivial.

I found a solution to this very problem, chum! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922623)

They call it an "extension cord". It actually carries charged energy from one locale to a different one! Imagine if you will an emplasticized orange coloured cord. You bind one end to the source of your electical energizement, and then plug your desired device (in this case your electro-conveyance) into the other end. I know it sounds truly bizarre, but this is THE FUTURE and almost anything is possible.

Re:Where's the Outlet? (1)

Chuck Chunder (21021) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922697)

Might be a problem in the US and Europe. In Japan they might do something absurd like create the required infrastructure rather than throwing their hands in the air and exclaiming that it's all too hard.

Re:Where's the Outlet? (1)

agilen (410830) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922763)

They have these in my city: http://z.about.com/d/alternativefuels/1/0/a/P/-/-/Portland_Charging_Station.jpg

Sure there aren't many yet, but there also aren't any all-electric mass produced cars on the market. Give it time...

Re:Where's the Outlet? (1)

Bottlemaster (449635) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922793)

A little hard to plug in at a condo car port or an apartment parking lot.

Apartments in the north already have outlets for block heaters.

I have had an electricity powered LEAF forever! (1)

chrispatch (578882) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922361)

I love my Linux Embedded Appliance Firewall!

Did anyone else wonder about that too ?

Re:I have had an electricity powered LEAF forever! (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922553)

According to the lack of replies and even lack of moderation, I would say "nope, just you".

But ... (0, Troll)

xjimhb (234034) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922387)

can I control the thing **WITHOUT** an iPhone? If it requires the iPhone, well, that would be a total deal-killer for me, as I will NEVER buy an iPhone.

Re:But ... (1)

Barny (103770) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922489)

Same, don't need a palm-top when a phone is all thats required.

FTFA it only lets you monitor the battery level and set the climate control.

Just think if it was remote control by Kindle (5, Funny)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922451)

It could make the car disappear. Parking problem, solved

Re:Just think if it was remote control by Kindle (1)

Yvan256 (722131) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922571)

Can somebody explain that joke for the rest of us?

Re:Just think if it was remote control by Kindle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 4 years ago | (#28922791)

Amazon deleted the ebook "1984" from Kindle customers because "1984" isn't public domain in the US.

Too many flaws.... (-1, Troll)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922467)

There are too many flaws in it for it to be considered anything more than a tech-demo. The major one is the pathetically short battery life (I can easily go over 300 miles with a full tank of gas) and the fact there is no easy way of getting the car started if you get stranded. With my gas car, if I run out of gas I just call up someone or a repair place to lend me a bit of gas till I can get to a gas station, with this, do you honestly think someone is going to lug around 100 pounds of batteries? Also, in emergency situations this car will do more harm than good. Just look at the pictures before a major hurricane sweeps through, crowded streets, people running out of gas, etc. and in hardly-moving traffic, you aren't going to get near 100 miles out of it. Than there is the fact that maintenance will be -expensive-, other than changing oil my gas car rarely needs maintenance, in the 5 years the only thing that needed replaced was a belt, something that electric cars have too. But batteries do not hold a charge forever. The more you use it the more it comes to having an expensive repair, no matter how nice you are or how good you take care of your electric car it will need replaced.

FUD Farm (3, Informative)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922581)

You have posted elsewhere the same thing. What are you, the brain damaged step-child of an Exxon board member?

A DOT vehicle can easily carry the batteries to get you to a charging station or even back to your house.

The hurricane fear mongering is just sad.

And maintenance is far less expensive for an EV, because it's far less complicated mechanically. If you'd done any research on the GM vehicle, you'd know that they basically rotated the tires. There are Priuses with over a hundred thousand miles that haven't needed new batteries. And the batteries will be less expensive too replace than putting in an entirely new engine, so you could literally keep the same car for decades if you kept it rust free.

Honestly, who is paying you to repeat the same inane bullshit?

Universal battery form factor is critical. (2, Interesting)

blankoboy (719577) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922499)

If the batteries for electric cards turns into a BluRay-HDDVD type format war things would get messy and hobble the efforts of getting this off the ground. All car manufacturers need to look the greater good (environment and consumers)and be in agreement on one standard form factor. Here's to hoping this happens.

Doomed. (0, Troll)

BitterOak (537666) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922603)

I'm sorry but the range and charging time aren't even close to being acceptable to the vast majority of users. How many people can afford two cars: one for the city and one for the highway? Yes, some families have two or more cars, but usually there are as many cars as commuters, so you'd still need an extra car for the highway. I think this car would have a very limited market. They wouldn't even be useful as pizza delivery cars for heaven's sake with that kind of charging time!

Wasn't there a story on Slashdot recently about a car that had a range over 200 miles with a ten minute charge time? That would be useful. But stats like the one on this car will simply turn people off electric cars for good.

Re:Doomed. (0, Flamebait)

copponex (13876) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922731)

This car's range and charging time are suitable for 90% of commuters. You may think it's not, but your baseless opinions have nothing to do with reality.

Re:Doomed. (0, Troll)

BitterOak (537666) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922833)

This car's range and charging time are suitable for 90% of commuters. You may think it's not, but your baseless opinions have nothing to do with reality.

If you'd bothered to read what I'd said, you'd have seen that I don't claim the car would be insufficient for a commute. Instead what I said is that most people can't afford to have two cars: one for commuting and one for the highway. Maintenance, insurance, and garage/parking space make it impractical for most people. Or are you assuming that people want to give up the ability to leave the city on occasion?

Re:Doomed. (3, Insightful)

Aurisor (932566) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922799)

According to their press release, they claim that 70% of their target consumers drive less than 100 miles a day. I know there are many USian cities that would make that unfeasable, but it's important to remember that this car is going to be a slam dunk for a lot of people out there.

Furthermore, once these things start to sell, I can't imagine it'd be too long before the capacity becomes comparable to a regular gas-guzzler.

200 volt power source (2)

narced (1078877) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922701)

Recharge time is 8 hours with a 200-volt power source

Recharge time is dependent on amp-hours, not volts. If you hook up a 200 volt power source that can only deliver 1 amp, you are not going to charge your batteries in 8 hours because that is only 8 amp-hours.

I image that the car is designed around residential wiring, which is usually 12 gauge and rated at 20 amps, so in 8 hours you should get 8*20=160 amp-hours, which at the quoted 200 volts is 32kWatt-hours. Based on $0.10 per kWh, it should cost $3.20 per charge.

Pwn yourself one today! (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922721)

an advanced computer system with remote control by IPhone,

So, which character [slashdot.org] do I send to hotwire your car?

I'm very interested in getting one! (1)

hozozco (856621) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922753)

If it comes to Australia and isn't too expensive then I'd get one. I have a Prius for longer trips (our Family needs 2 cars) and this would be perfect for my commute to work. I'd use Public transport if I could, but the drive takes 15 minutes compared to 1 hour plus by bus. I think once these things are availabe you will see more infrastructure appearing. It's good to have a choice! :-)

Just interested in the batteries (2, Interesting)

bogaboga (793279) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922795)

I wish I can get a hold of the batteries. I am sure they are a better replacement to the Trojan batteries I am using for my solar system.

Owner doesn't own the battery! (2, Informative)

yopie (470181) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922801)

The article fail to mention that owner doesn't own the battery and the infrastructure of electricity to power the electric car.

Nissan Leaf is part of Project Better Place have been discussed since last year. Wired have a article about it http://www.wired.com/cars/futuretransport/magazine/16-09/ff_agassi?currentPage=all [wired.com]

And this is the presentation about the Project Better Place. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfGEbTcNuzA [youtube.com]

City states (5, Insightful)

flyingfsck (986395) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922835)

There are places in the world that are literally just a single city, with nowhere else to go: Singapore, Dubai, Hong Kong, Monaco, Windhoek and many little islands. Those could make good use of these type of cars.

Why should I like this better than say... (3, Insightful)

The Wooden Badger (540258) | more than 4 years ago | (#28922837)

A Tesla Model S

It has a better range, a quicker full charge, a potential 5 minute battery swap, and the "S" is for SEXY.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...