×

Announcing: Slashdot Deals - Explore geek apps, games, gadgets and more. (what is this?)

Thank you!

We are sorry to see you leave - Beta is different and we value the time you took to try it out. Before you decide to go, please take a look at some value-adds for Beta and learn more about it. Thank you for reading Slashdot, and for making the site better!

Google's South Korean Offices Raided

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the hate-when-that-happens dept.

Google 99

lee1 writes "The Seoul police raided Google's office in Seoul, S. Korea today on suspicion that they have illegally collected users' location data, without consent, for advertising purposes. Google claims to be cooperating with the investigation."

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

uh-oh... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36013338)

Zerg Rush!

Re:uh-oh... (1)

Geldon (444090) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013602)

Google got totally 6-pooled.

That time of the year (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013350)

Annual Korean raid, eh?

Re:That time of the year (1)

piripiri (1476949) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013636)

They mixed up Apple with Google. Rookie mistake.

Re:That time of the year (1)

Schwhat (1993980) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013752)

Maybe because South Koreans don't know how to read (TOS).

Perhaps Google (2)

Presto Vivace (882157) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013926)

does not know how to read Korean law. In any case it is nice to see a government taking this seriously.
    • I have said it before and will say it again, there is a fortune to be made by building internet software that would enable us to do all the things we want to do on the web in a way that preserves our privacy.

Re:Perhaps Google (2)

gorzek (647352) | more than 3 years ago | (#36014816)

The vast majority of people do not care enough about their own privacy to make protecting it a viable business model. Sad but true.

Re:Perhaps Google (1)

migla (1099771) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015380)

A small minority of people can still be tons of people. For search, it seems duckduckgo.com have that model.

Re:Perhaps Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36017464)

DuckDuckGo is just a mediocre front-end to Bing. And since Bing's long-tail results are heavily weighted to scraped Google results, all you're really doing is leeching off of Google through a parasite of a parasite. I hope that's working out well for you.

Re:Perhaps Google (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015408)

OBL liked his privacy. If a government wants to get you, it will. Privacy is an illusion.

Re:Perhaps Google (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015446)

I would settle for just Google and Apple not having access to my personal information.

Re:Perhaps Google (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 3 years ago | (#36016992)

Then don't use a "Smart Phone" like iPhone or Android. Use a stupid phone or ... ghhhaaaahh a Blackberry

Re:Perhaps Google (1)

Stupendoussteve (891822) | more than 3 years ago | (#36017606)

Lunchtime privacy doubly so.

Re:Perhaps Google (1)

sabt-pestnu (967671) | more than 3 years ago | (#36016420)

> that would enable us to do all the things we want to do on the web in a way that preserves our privacy.

In that person X wants to track you while preserving his privacy, and you want to "not be tracked" while preserving YOUR privacy, I see a conflict inherent in your statement that can only be resolved by

a) defining a "them" as different from "us"
b) limiting "all the things we want to do"
or c) redefining "privacy"

Note that (a) fails immediately: if you can distinguish "us" from "them", privacy has not been preserved.

NOT implementing (b) has negative social results [penny-arcade.com] .

That doesn't leave a lot left, to be honest.

Re:Perhaps Google (1)

cheeks5965 (1682996) | more than 3 years ago | (#36020258)

your comment is facile. OBVIOUSLY the answer is b. maybe you would feel better if we restricted op's comment a bit. Are you comfortable with this:

>> ...that would enable us to do all the things we want to do on the web in a way that preserves our privacy*

* does not include
pedo porn
stealing people's money
building zombie bots
sending millions of spams
stalking people (goes to your silly strawman argument)

So we all agree now.

Re:Perhaps Google (1)

easyTree (1042254) | more than 3 years ago | (#36016974)

... there is a fortune to be made by building internet software that would enable us to do all the things we want to do on the web in a way that preserves our privacy.

I'll get right on that now. I'll be giving it away for free and funding it using micro-targeted embedded ads. w00t!

Re:Perhaps Google (1)

Cyberllama (113628) | more than 3 years ago | (#36021318)

Or perhaps Google's not breaking the law and they're just a victim of ridiculous hysteria.

Re:Perhaps Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36022288)

So now, all that information about people that was carefully stashed away by Google is now in the hands of the government. Kudos to you South Korean government, you have now made all other governments jealous. We applaud the sneaky way you went about this.

Re:That time of the year (2)

ElectricTurtle (1171201) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013928)

The thing is that any contract that contravenes law is automatically invalid where it does so. If South Korea has laws that require a different form/method of disclosure/consent than the way Google implemented, TOS regardless they may have violated RSK law. IANAL, Korean or otherwise.

Re:That time of the year (1)

slick7 (1703596) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015168)

They mixed up Apple with Google. Rookie mistake.

Lookie Mistake. FTFY

Re:That time of the year (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36015768)

They mixed up Apple with Google. Rookie mistake.

It's easy to talk rubbish and look funny isn't it?
Get your story straight.

What a joke (2)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013412)

I doubt Google would store anything 'illegal' on a South Korean server.. unless they're trying to hide it from the EU, Chinese, or American prosecutors.

Re:What a joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36013682)

It's not on a server, the evidence is buried in the back yard, next to the kimchi.

Re:What a joke (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36014378)

If they were trying to hide something from America, they picked the wrong country to do it in... South Korea and America have been allies since the Korean War. Hell South Korea appreciates the continued involvement of the U.S. Military. It's the only thing keeping the Red-Tide at bay. If we were to leave the entire peninsula would fall under one banner.

Google got raided. (1)

slashpot (11017) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013416)

"Google got raided." -Beavis
"ug ug - yeah - RAIDED!" -Butthead

Re:Google got raided. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36014016)

What the fuck are you on that makes you think this was funny?

Re:Google got raided. (1)

slashpot (11017) | more than 3 years ago | (#36037796)

your momma

Cake! (1)

TemperedAlchemist (2045966) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013450)

GOoGLE just needed more test subjects. For science.

Re:Cake! (1)

eggled (1135799) | more than 3 years ago | (#36014076)

You monster.

Re:Cake! (1)

Talderas (1212466) | more than 3 years ago | (#36016004)

GOoGLE saved science?

The location data showed that they're all (2)

PylonHead (61401) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013498)

At the local PC bang playing starcraft/broodwar?

Google goin' to Jail! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36013556)

About time too!

Re:Google goin' to Jail! (1)

i kan reed (749298) | more than 3 years ago | (#36014138)

Why do you think they allowed all those Android jailbreaking apps?

Associated Press Article (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36013584)

A (shorter) AP report is here [www.cbc.ca] .

Re:Associated Press Article (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36013714)

A longer version is here [theglobeandmail.com] .

ALL YOUR BASE (2)

rwa2 (4391) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013618)

... are about to belong to South Korea's finest. If your location data was safe with Google before, it belongs to the government now! :D

So... any guess as to whom the police be looking for that makes it worth raiding a Google office to bring down? Do the South Koreans even have their own version of mafia / yakuza / etc.?

Re:ALL YOUR BASE (2)

halfEvilTech (1171369) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013656)

Google wants location data to better sale advertisements, where governments want data because .

This is a pick your poison, but I don't trust any government with the amount of data that google has likely accumulated on us.

Re:ALL YOUR BASE (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 3 years ago | (#36016116)

step 1: google (a non-gov company) collects all knowable info about you
step 2: country wants this and raids local office of google
step 3: worry

don't say we didn't warn you about giving any one company too much power and control. now, its a single point of shopping for any government that has physical access to a google office.

google collects the data; guy with guns and 'badges' come in and snag it.

welcome to your brave new world.

(btw, fb and that twit shit are also 'love fests' for the gov when they want more data to connect dots).

Re:ALL YOUR BASE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36013686)

> Do the South Koreans even have their own version of mafia / yakuza / etc.

Oh yes (https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Kkangpae), and they are serious badasses.

There was a "Korean Mafia Only" bar in Phnom Penh for the guys who needed to get out of town for a spell while the heat died down. You didn't go there, you didn't park there, you stayed away from there.

Re:ALL YOUR BASE (1)

Mister Whirly (964219) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015216)

Yeah, and it looked pretty badass with all those Hyundais with tinted windows parked out back...

Re:ALL YOUR BASE (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#36017478)

Yeah, it's not ok for Google to have the data, but it's ok for the S. Korean government to have it. I'm sure they will immediately destroy it (if it exists) and not do any mining of their own. Trust Your Government (tm).

Re:ALL YOUR BASE (1)

Zanadou (1043400) | more than 3 years ago | (#36032700)

<quote><p> Do the South Koreans even have their own version of mafia / yakuza / etc.?</p>
</quote>

Yes, they're called "kkangpae" or just "pa". Wikipedia has a little more info.

Don't be evil (1)

kriston (7886) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013658)

Don't be evil.

Part of the motto is that you should also not give the perception of being evil. A mirror evaluation goes a long way in this respect.

Re:Don't be evil (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36013952)

Don't be stupid.

Part of this motto is that you should not give the perception of being stupid.

Re:Don't be evil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36015454)

Please add to the conversation, or at least give the perception of adding to the conversation.

Re:Don't be evil (1)

Cyberllama (113628) | more than 3 years ago | (#36021334)

Except that increasingly, Google is finding that the perception of being evil is based on nothing more than being big. People inherently mistrust them. This is all smoke, and other than Steve Jobs throwing a barbecue, there's no signs of fire.

Re:Don't be evil (1)

kriston (7886) | more than 3 years ago | (#36024232)

Not in this case. While collecting WiFi is akin to iPhone's collecting WiFi to create a higher quality tracking database, in Google's case, GPS should have been enough and Google's collecting of WiFi data has no legitimate use.

Re:Don't be evil (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36031380)

While collecting OPEN Wifi data can be considered dubious, it is perfectly legal. Who are you to say that collecting open wifi data at the same time as mapping data will never be legitimately useful for anything? Maybe google is making a map of free open Wifi for businesses for mapping purposes and they happened to collect residential at the same time (and not delete it in case somehow it can be used in the future for statistics or whatnot), although publishing the residential open wifi data might be illegal, it is what it is, free wifi hotspots flowing through the air whether intentional or not. Maybe the owners meant to leave it open.. or it is MAC address filtered. If not, its their mistake, not Googles. If you want to mistrust google for this flaw, fine, but there are no laws against this. I'm sure they consulted their legal team before collecting the data.

Re:Don't be evil (1)

Cyberllama (113628) | more than 3 years ago | (#36065558)

The ultimate point, however, is that Google's "Location tracking" is:

1) Opt-in, instead of Opt-out
2) Very clearly described at the time of opt-in
3) Anonymized and therefore not actaully "tracking" (though the anonymization may be taking place server-side instead of client-side)

These three things make this entire situation nonsense. If it anonymously submits the locations of Wifi networks it finds, who the hell cares? That's perfectly legitimate data to collect. It allows Google to replicate the service/functionality of Skyhook.

The news (1)

microbee (682094) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013742)

The raid continued for 40 minutes. As the law enforcement agents moved forward in the massive compound of Google's, the office manager tried to shield the server with an iPad. But he was soon taken into custody.

Re:The news (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013966)

Do servers go to heaven?

Re:The news (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#36017492)

And do they get 72 power supplies?

Re:The news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36014210)

The police were afraid the raid might wipe when the Google office sent out a massive aoe dot while fearing the healers.

Re:The news (1)

slick7 (1703596) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015226)

The raid continued for 40 minutes. As the law enforcement agents moved forward in the massive compound of Google's, the office manager tried to shield the server with an iPad. But he was soon taken into custody.

Blah blah blah...Double Tap...film at eleven.

Re:The news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36018838)

The raid continued for 40 minutes.

Must be some really crappy RAID, if it can't run for more than 40 minutes. Just because it says "Inexpensive Disks" doesn't mean you have to use the cheapest ones.

Don't maphack in Korea (1)

ifrag (984323) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013824)

Well seriously, what did they expect? The top Starcraft players are not OK with Google's real life maphacking. South Korea isn't gonna put up with that crap.

Tone down the paranoia (3, Interesting)

Bucc5062 (856482) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013854)

What is going these days? People suing over location information, others running to buy tinfoil to make hats (and we know where you go to buy it) thinking there is this great conspiracy to know each individuals whereabouts in practical real time.

Are we all terrorists? Are we all so important that we need to hide from stalkers and three letter agencies? a very large portion of the population of this planet is not that important.

I appreciate privacy. I love my 4th amendment rights and I would not want any illegal use of data that would cause me harm including location data. If we are so consumed about this issue then lets get our representatives to enact laws to stop this practice. Require an "Opt In", not an "Opt Out". So we get Google and Apple to stop collecting data; that wont stop you from being tracked. Credit card receipts, security cameras, cell tower triangulation, the list is long on ways people and governments can figure out where you've been and what you've been doing. Want off the grid? Live in a forest and make it all yourself. Not my cup of tea.

There are ways to deal with this other then extreme, over the top methods like invading offices overseas or 50 million dollar suits (please...grow up). Like others have said, pull the battery, turn off a feature, write to the company and tell them to stop, but in the end, you bought into it. Me? I still carry a dumb phone, mainly use maps, and don't blab about every minutia of my life on the web. I may get a smartphone one day, I may rely on GPS systems one day, but when I do, the last thing I will worry about is whether Google or Apple or RIM or whom ever is saving my location. What I will get pissed about is if they sell that data and its used in a way that provides for illegal activity by people or governments against me or other people. That is facilitation of a crime and that should be dealt with firmly.

Re:Tone down the paranoia (2)

softWare3ngineer (2007302) | more than 3 years ago | (#36014236)

I don't buy the ' I'm not doing anything wrong argument'. these people will be up in arms when their house is raided after they order the wrong book or visit the wrong site. You may think that people are smarter than that, and I agree, but there is to much information for people to sift through. It will be up to a computer to put you on a search-me-at-the-airport list not a person.

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

Bucc5062 (856482) | more than 3 years ago | (#36014508)

Actually, I don't buy that position either. I don't trust the law or the government even when I feel I have not done anything wrong, but currently we still have checks against abuse and that is what I am referring too. Most likely it could be a computer program that pops a name out for suspicious activity or adds it to a "don't allow them to ????" list, but it is people that monitor and implement that list and those people can be held accountable. We cannot stop data collection. In this age it is impossible. What we can do is structure the laws that protect citizens such that the data carries responsibilities.

Its off topic, but look at the "Do Not Call" list created after the flood of telemarketing burst upon the scene. We could not stop the calling, but We could control it, limit it, and render it moot. Suing Google, raiding the office is stupid and short sighted. We want this controlled. National Opt Out programs to require OS or app developers to turn off location data. Laws requiring disclosure of selling my data (location data) to marketing agencies. Now I am not naive enough to believe a representative of the corpora^H^H^H^H^H^H^H people would support privacy rights to citizens, but its a better approach then ME ME ME; I'll take mine, screw you.

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

Dishevel (1105119) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015122)

So your problem is not with a company having your info. It is with a government having it.
I agree. I trust Google to not abuse my information too much. If they do they will stop getting it.
I TRUST that the government WILL abuse the information they get on me.

They always do.

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

scot4875 (542869) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015274)

Ok, I'm just curious: name one way in which the government has abused information they have on you. Not a "they could abuse it like this" or "they abused someone else's information," but a concrete example of them abusing your information.

Don't take this as a disagreement that datamining by the government isn't generally a bad thing; I just suspect that you're full of shit.

--Jeremy

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 3 years ago | (#36016484)

2010 Census Questions. Required. By Law. For no purpose other than political power wielding by certain groups who benefit from the collected data. That, by itself is enough. It erodes the very idea of "one person, one vote" to being more like "all votes are equal, some are more equal than others"

The only thing that is currently in government's favor is the general incompetence of those in government to do anything useful/harmful with the info it has.

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

similar_name (1164087) | more than 3 years ago | (#36014326)

If we are so consumed about this issue then lets get our representatives to enact laws to stop this practice.

There are ways to deal with this other then extreme, over the top methods like invading offices overseas,

So if what Google is doing is illegal in S. Korea, what is over the top about raiding Google's S. Korean office.

Re:Tone down the paranoia (4, Insightful)

G00F (241765) | more than 3 years ago | (#36014406)

Corporation existence is to make money, it doesn't care how. It only cares of public perception causes its bottom line to change. Then these same companies pay billions to make it so there are no other choices but them. I'm not taking research or marketing, but patents, laws/politicians, lawyers, etc.

So how is any of that extreme? Anything less is ineffective and water off a ducks back. Heck nvidia spend over 500m in spare cash allocated for such uses. Big woopie, just a "cost of doing business". But at least there is a choice (bought my first ATI/AMD based graphics card and 2 others, since they pulled this crap) But if you cant switch away, or if enough people can't(or dont) the only thing you are left with is lawsuits.

Extreme is the fact that even thought I paid for my phone, I don't own it, and have to "break it" just to remove crap applications from amazon/skype/facebook/etc that are all allowed to track everything I do, everyplace I go. Extreme is the fact if they lose my information, I don't get compensated in anyway, but the problem is shoveled off as "my identity" was stolen.

And by the same token governments create a need for more government. They will find a need to use such data all the time, and it will be abused, it always has been and always will be.

No, being in control of your life and data about your life is not extreme.

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

FreakyGreenLeaky (1536953) | more than 3 years ago | (#36014566)

+1

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

ect5150 (700619) | more than 3 years ago | (#36016454)

What do you mean you "can't switch away" ? You can always go _without_ !!

Re:Tone down the paranoia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36019668)

Corporation existence is to make money, it doesn't care how.

I think accepting is the root of many problems. I feel their purpose should be to provide a service or product.

The complainants (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 3 years ago | (#36019970)

In this case I think we will find that the cause for this raid is the same as always. It's subsidized by Google's competition. It's about making Google look evil.

Re:Tone down the paranoia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36014558)

Well aren't you a good little citizen. Now go back to reading propaganda.

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

Kamiza Ikioi (893310) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015040)

In other words, stop whining and be proactive if you value your privacy over convenience because others value the convenience and aren't disturbed except when they lose services because of your whining. We're talking to you, Blur-many [gizmodo.com] .

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

mathfeel (937008) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015104)

You sentiment seems sensible, and I mostly agree. Unfortunately people like you and I are not going to make bunch of lawyers money. So there...

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

antdude (79039) | more than 3 years ago | (#36016088)

Let's stalk Bucc5062! [grin]

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | more than 3 years ago | (#36016152)

look up the utube video series 'dont talk to cops'.

learn from someone in the field (the lecturer) WHY giving even true honest info to a cop can be bad for you.

we live in a complex world. just BEING innocent is not enough.

go watch those videos. there is a lot of wisdom in there. and your answer is in there, too.

Re:Tone down the paranoia (1)

Cyberllama (113628) | more than 3 years ago | (#36021424)

Google is already opt-in, instead of opt-out. This whole thing is ridiculous and baseless.

Advice needed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36013944)

I'm hesitating between a "zerg rush" joke and a "I'm in ur server checking your illegally collected data" one.

thank you for your cooperation (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 3 years ago | (#36013974)

Google claims to be cooperating with the investigation."

A group of soldiers pointing AK47's at you tends to elicit that response.

Re:thank you for your cooperation (1)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | more than 3 years ago | (#36014022)

North Koreans not South Koreans use AKs. Not that there's all that much difference.

Re:thank you for your cooperation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36014166)

"A group of soldiers pointing AK47's at you tends to elicit that response."

ITYM, Daewoo K2 [wikipedia.org] s.

Follow-up (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36013990)

South Korean officials anticipated that Google would be able to retrieve their seized servers following a complete review of the contents by Samsung.

North or South (0)

Vinegar Joe (998110) | more than 3 years ago | (#36014014)

Koreans tend to be xenophobic dickheads.

Re:North or South (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36014572)

Korean or not,
People tend to be xenophobic dickheads.

Re:North or South (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36014602)

Xenophobic or not,
People tend to be dickheads.

Re:North or South (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36014866)

Dickheads or not, people tend to be...hmm...

Re:North or South (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36016780)

Dicks or not, people tend to have heads.

Funny thing is. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36014736)

They will raid for them for the exact thing they would do if they could get away with it.

Im sure they are co-operating because in korea, Im the sure the government isnt giving them any choice. Co-operation is probablly somewhere along the lines of having a gun pointed to your head and you doing what they say. Hey it works in america when your accused of doing something, they break in your house point guns at you and take anything they think is evidence to prove your guilty despite up till that point your not technically guilty of anything for sure, its just assumed you are. Look at the guy who had his house smashed in by fbi, thrown down stairs and guns put in his face because they assumed he downloaded childporn, in the fact he didnt.

Korea is the true Democratic People's Republic (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36015016)

Sorry, but I can't help laughing at your face America. When Apple got caught of secretly collecting their users' location data, there was essentially no official reaction in the US – just a few disappointed blog posts and maybe some class action lawsuits that could see some fruit .. at some point in the 2020s?

But, in Soviet Korea, when the State learns of Google stealing its citizens' data, they put on their uniforms and raid their office, and are not ashamed to put an end to this criminal activity. They are simply doing what our Government should be doing instead of licking the corporate buttcrack: protecting the citizens' privacy!

And all the time the news from Korea are full of Obama & Hillary bashing them and spreading FUD about an alleged WMDs program and other made-up b*llshit. But in the end, whatever you think about their Great Leader, Korea at least has a good reason to be proud of its socialism when it comes to protecting its citizens from corporate supremacism.

Re:Korea is the true Democratic People's Republic (1)

praxis (19962) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015298)

I think you got your Koreas confused.

Re:Korea is the true Democratic People's Republic (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36022568)

Lol, this is most faily comment I've read in a while. :D

Shakedown... (1)

all5n (1239664) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015028)

Yearly "Shakedown" for donations? Or it could just be that the Korean government doesn't like the competition.

the question is... (1)

StripedCow (776465) | more than 3 years ago | (#36015126)

did they get a hold on Google's secret search formulas?

Daum was also raided for the same reasons (2)

John Saffran (1763678) | more than 3 years ago | (#36016026)

Hours later, SMPA investigators also conducted a surprise raid on the headquarters of local portal site Daum on similar suspicions. The investigators confiscated hard drives and other documents during their raid on Daum's Seoul office in Hannam-dong, central Seoul.

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/national/2011/05/03/28/0302000000AEN20110503005600315F.HTML [yonhapnews.co.kr]

To put it bluntly, collecting personal data that isn't necessary is illegal in Korea .. like it should be everywhere else to be quite honest.

Not sure why so many people seem to be suggesting that Google (or any other company) should be collect all sorts of data at will.

Re:Daum was also raided for the same reasons (1)

LordLucless (582312) | more than 3 years ago | (#36017924)

Not sure why so many people seem to be suggesting that Google (or any other company) should be collect all sorts of data at will.

Probably because there's another solution that involves personal responsibility, rather than knee-jerk reactions by vote-pandering politicians: if you don't want Google to know something, don't tell them. Also, the idea of outlawing "knowing" something strikes a bad chord with many people.

Re:Daum was also raided for the same reasons (1)

John Saffran (1763678) | more than 3 years ago | (#36019242)

The laws that apply in this case refer to data that you didn't agree to such as location tracking (for which Apple is under investigation), or the wi-fi scanning that Google got into trouble earlier.

Ýou may disagree but I wouldn't call upholding people's rights to privacy as 'vote-pandering' .. this is a rare case of a law that makes sense and should be implemented across other countries.

Re:Daum was also raided for the same reasons (1)

LordLucless (582312) | more than 3 years ago | (#36020174)

The laws that apply in this case refer to data that you didn't agree to such as location tracking (for which Apple is under investigation), or the wi-fi scanning that Google got into trouble earlier.

It's hard to say what the laws in this case are, going from the article. All they say is a Google acquisition called "AdMob" got in trouble for collecting location data - they mention nothing about consent, or even how the information as obtained.

In any event, I was mostly responding to your implication that companies should only be able to collect data that is deemed "necessary" by, I imagine, some sort of government mandate (restricting companies to collecting data that they believe necessary being rather pointless).

Ýou may disagree but I wouldn't call upholding people's rights to privacy as 'vote-pandering' .. this is a rare case of a law that makes sense and should be implemented across other countries.

No, it's a case of executing policy instead of holding people accountable for stupidity. The wi-fi scanning is a case in point; people configured wireless routers to spew their data to anything that knew how to listen. They didn't bother to educate themselves on how the system worked, or listen to the experts who've been telling people to secure their routers for years. Then when they get bitten, instead of accepting their mistake and securing their damn routers, they expect government to protect them from the repercussions of their own stupidity.

I don't know about Apple (don't own an iPhone), but my Android phone told me explicitly (via a popup window, not buried in a EULA) before it enabled assisted GPS mode, and sent my location data to Google's servers. I'm against bloated and far-reaching EULAs as much as anyone else, but I'm also against punishing companies because their customers don't know enough to realise that sending location data is inherent in some location-based services and are too lazy to actually read anything that tells them this is the case.

Re:Daum was also raided for the same reasons (1)

Cyberllama (113628) | more than 3 years ago | (#36021410)

Google is opt-in, for god's sake. All this hysteria over nothing. The phone ships with location services off. During the set up, you must turn it on and when you do, it warns you that this will cause locational data to be sent to Google. Once Google gets the data, they anonymize it so it can't ever be linked back to a user. What more do you want? What should Google do that they aren't already doing? Tell me, oh wise one, how can they possibly be less evil?

Remember, these phones all use AGPS, which literally means they can't even figure out your damn location without sending it to another server. If you have one of those phones, your location is broadcast to someone, somewhere. It cannot be helped.

Apparently South Korean police don't use Android (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36018914)

... or they'd know that location tracking is strictly opt-in. The default is off, and the user is EXPLICITLY asked during setup whether they want to enable it.

Re:Apparently South Korean police don't use Androi (1)

Cyberllama (113628) | more than 3 years ago | (#36021434)

But, but, Steve Jobs said! And then two women sued! And then Verizon added warning stickers, even though the warnings are about VERIZON having your location data, not Google. There's so much smoke, surely there's fire! And now that South Korea has done it, there's even more smoke. So now there will be congressional hearings, again.

Once you get big enough, you make an easy target.

~facepalm~ (1)

zer01ife (2002158) | more than 3 years ago | (#36021044)

Since Google are co-operating with the investigation and providing information of their activities, then they're in the green area. You don't have to worry, if you're a good citizen, of course. But, if you were a jerk and start doing bad things like drugs/crimes and Google have the same tools used by Apple to track your location, then things should be useful to help officials get things on you.
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?