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Satellite Glitch Leaves Northern Canada In the (Internet) Dark

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the back-to-gold-oil-and-moose dept.

The Internet 282

zentigger writes "At approximately 06:36 EDT Thursday, October 6, 2011, the Anik F2 satellite experienced an attitude control issue and lost earth lock, affecting C, Ku and Ka services. The satellite went into safety mode and moved from pointing to the earth to pointing to the sun. This has put most of Northern Canada in the dark as all internet and phone services come in over F2."

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Don't worry, they're Canadians (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627464)

So they will politely and patiently wait out the problem.

Re:Don't worry, they're Canadians (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627508)

Don't forget writing polite letters to newspapers and politicians. Canadians like to write letters.

Re:Don't worry, they're Canadians (1)

Moheeheeko (1682914) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627546)

Most will just thank the satelite crators for the service they have had so far, and hope that they will continue such services in the future.

Re:Don't worry, they're Canadians (1, Flamebait)

na1led (1030470) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627890)

they've always been in the Dark, so it's no big deal!

Re:Don't worry, they're Canadians (2)

daem0n1x (748565) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627940)

They're probably only 10 people, anyway.

Re:Don't worry, they're Canadians (3, Funny)

davester666 (731373) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628016)

Why is the default position for the satellite to provide internet acces to the sun?

Re:Don't worry, they're Canadians (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628106)

I would guess as to not interfere with other satellite signals. The antennae are design to broadcast in a certain pattern.

Re:Don't worry, they're Canadians (1)

Mitchell314 (1576581) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628230)

Yeah, but if multiple satellites point at the sun then it still gets interference.

Get an academic on this pronto (3, Insightful)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627468)

This is the perfect chance to find out the real cost of a first world nation not having internet access. We need these numbers to make better laws about internet access restriction and even to decide whether it should be a right.

Re:Get an academic on this pronto (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627752)

Northern Canada is not really a first-world region. It's mostly empty, frozen land and remote communities of native people living pretty basic lifestyles. Not much in common with the cities in the South.

Re:Get an academic on this pronto (2)

robthebloke (1308483) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628254)

What do the UK, US, germany, Japan, and Canada all have in common? That's right, they all have polar bears.
What do Ghana, Zimbabwe, and Afghanistan have in common? That's right, no polar bears at all.

So as you can see, countries with polar bears are developed, those without are less developed. Q.E.D. Canada is a developed country because it has polar bears.

Re:Get an academic on this pronto (1)

waterford0069 (580760) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627788)

That depends on whether you consider "Northern Canada" 1st world or not. I'm sure many of it's inhabitants would be happy just living in 2nd world conditions (visit most First Nations Reserves in any part of Canada and experience the 3rd world in North America).

Beside, most of Southern Canada, say bellow the 54th parallel is A.O.K. as far as internet and phone connectivity goes today. Well, except paying through the nose for a Gig of data (wired or wireless) compared to many parts of the world.

Re:Get an academic on this pronto (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628108)

That depends on whether you consider "Northern Canada" 1st world or not. I'm sure many of it's inhabitants would be happy just living in 2nd world conditions (visit most First Nations Reserves in any part of Canada and experience the 3rd world in North America).

Beside, most of Southern Canada, say bellow the 54th parallel is A.O.K. as far as internet and phone connectivity goes today. Well, except paying through the nose for a Gig of data (wired or wireless) compared to many parts of the world.

Northern Canada is exactly the same as everywhere else in this 1ST WORLD COUNTRY, it's just colder. Come freeze your balls off and see for yourself.

Re:Get an academic on this pronto (1)

robthebloke (1308483) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628360)

Come freeze your balls off and see for yourself.

No thanks, I'd just spend too much time looking at the empty space where my balls used to sit.......

Re:Get an academic on this pronto (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628156)

Northern Canada is hardly a good test situation as the population density there is nearly that of the Sahara. A better test would be to knock out internet and such to Vancouver. Besides, a loss of internet isn't going to really "cost" much in areas already geographically remote enough to routinely have sub-par services and lower end infrastructure. They are already prepared for losses of services due to natural events.... such as winter.

How 1960s (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627476)

It's time to get rid of these antiqued orbiting antennas and all the associated headaches. Just bring fiber to the North, damn it. Technology has changed so much (that's the usual refrain), why are we still using decades-old technology?

Re:How 1960s (4, Funny)

bugs2squash (1132591) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627502)

Yes, just tie it to the back of white fang, say mush, and watch the spool unreel.

Fiber to remote communities difficult (1)

rwade (131726) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627622)

From what I understand, northern Canada is somewhat remote. In fact, I understand there to be limited road access above the 75th parallel in much of the country. I would posit that it would be unfeasibly expensive to lay and maintain fiber cable out through difficult a media (permafrost) to support communities that number in the dozens.

Satellites seem to me to offer the best way to connect small settlements spread out across millions of square miles of the Canadian back country.

Re:Fiber to remote communities difficult (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628062)

Check your atlas. I'm pretty sure there are no roads above the 75th parallel because there is a dearth of land up there upon which to build roads. :-) I think you mean 55th parallel, which would be accurate.

Re:Fiber to remote communities difficult (1)

rwade (131726) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628196)

Check your atlas. I'm pretty sure there are no roads above the 75th parallel because there is a dearth of land up there upon which to build roads. :-) I think you mean 55th parallel, which would be accurate.

Sometimes I would just kill for a way to revise my slashdot comments. About 3 minutes after I posted, I did some googling and found that the 60th parallel [wikipedia.org] separates the lower Canadian provinces from NWT, Yukon, and Nunavut.

Don't know where the long-distance roads stop, though. I was just in Quebec and remember looking at a road atlas to see how far north the road from Chicoutimi reached -- for some reason, the 75th stuck in my head. Don't know why, though...

Re:How 1960s (1)

LikwidCirkel (1542097) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627624)

Do you have any idea how sparse the population is up there, and just how much land you'd have to cover? It's like laying 500km of fiber for every person.

Not to mention that you'd have to deal with seasonal melting and freezing of muskeg and swamps and lakes.

Not going to happen any time soon.

Re:How 1960s (2)

Lieutenant_Dan (583843) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627638)

Simple: economics. It costs money to support and maintain. In a country as large as Canada there's a lot of infrastructure (rail, roads, air traffic, mail, and in some cases telephone) that is paid or subsized by the federal (or provincial) government. For instance, there's a a beautifully maintained ~200km highway stretch between Barrie and Sudbury (Ontario) with very little in between. You have very limited wireless coverage as well (not even talking cell phones here, just old-fashioned radio/CB), important for things like emergency services. Who is paying for that?

In some parts of the world it's not viable to have a small community on the larger "grid". I've been to many locations in Vancouver Island, northern Ontario, Manitoba, and Alberta where your communications and even utility options are very limited.

I've also seen that in parts of New Mexico, Colorado, and Quintana Roo that are isolated. I'm sure Russia has the same challenges.

Re:How 1960s (4, Funny)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627910)

Won't work. Hikers in the Canadian wilderness have long carried a piece of fiber optic cable with them. If they get lost, they just bury the cable and hitch a ride back when the backhoe comes to dig it up.

hilarious :) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627492)

"attitude control issue"

Re:hilarious :) (1)

bohmt (900463) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627962)

attitude: Aeronautics . the inclination of the three principal axes of an aircraft relative to the wind, to the ground, etc. ie where it is pointing

Re:hilarious :) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627990)

3. The orientation of an aircraft's axes relative to a reference line or plane, such as the horizon.
4. The orientation of a spacecraft relative to its direction of motion.

Deceptive Summary (1)

idontgno (624372) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627526)

Even the editors* noticed that and added the parenthetical clarification.

"In the dark" does not mean "in the literal darkness, without the power to generate light or heat." I.e., not a power generation or distribution problem, which is the expected context of the stock phrase "in the dark".

They mean "In the INTARWEBS dark." As in, no Facebook, no Twitter, no YouTube.

You know, an actual crisis.

*Seriously. How bad do you have to be, that the world-famous Slashdot Editor Corps feels compelled to actually edit you? That's... INCONCEIVABLE.

Re:Deceptive Summary (1)

N!k0N (883435) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627942)

That's... INCONCEIVABLE.

you keep saying that. I'm not sure it means what you think it means.

Re:Deceptive Summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628368)

you keep saying that. I'm not sure it means what you think it means.

It just so happens that your internet here is only MOSTLY dead. There's a big difference between mostly dead and all dead. Mostly dead is slightly alive.

Re:Deceptive Summary (1)

Ian_Bailey (469273) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628202)

Although you are correct in that it is not a literal power outage, it is far more than just the "INTARWEBS", because so much in the North depends on Satellite communication.

From the article:
"People in Iqaluit are reporting they are without cell phone service and long-distance calling, bank machines and debit-card machines. At least one bank in the city has not opened today as a result. Flights are also being delayed."

Meanwhile (3, Funny)

otaku244 (1804244) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627536)

Residents on the Sun say their reception has gone up 100%

Re:Meanwhile (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627606)

No one lives on the sun you idiot. The rent is too high.

Re:Meanwhile (1)

roblarky (1103715) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627628)

They're only slightly annoyed by the > 8 minute latency.

Re:Meanwhile (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627846)

As a long time AOL user and satisfied customer, it's not very often I get the chance to call anybody else a wuss....

Re:Meanwhile (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627652)

but the 16 minute ping time is hell

Oblig... (2)

DigitalSorceress (156609) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627558)

It's as if a hundred voices cried out in terror and were suddenly silenced.

Ok, sorry that was in bad taste. I love my frosty neighbors to the North (I've spent a lot of time in Canada and really do love the place and the people). I hope they get interwebz back soon.

Re:Oblig... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627654)

Most of the canadian population lives within a couple hundred kilometres of the border anyway, so this inconveniences very few people relatively speaking. I wonder if there will be a population boom in 9 months as people look for an alternative entertainment :)

Re:Oblig... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627678)

Don't worry, they can't read your comment anyway!

They can't hear us anymore... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627608)

Let's say everything about Canada we were too polite to say earlier!

Re:They can't hear us anymore... (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627900)

Erm... actually, Canada's been a pretty good sport about our jokes. We don't have anything held back to say!

However, when France loses it's internet connection....

Re:They can't hear us anymore... (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628400)

Who has been holding back on French jokes?

They are not good sports, but who the fuck cares? What are they going to do?

Q: What did the mayor of Paris say to the general at the front to of the German armored columns rolling into town?

A: Table for 150,000 misuer.?

1st Iran (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627610)

and now Canada... Sure, tell 'em it's a satellite (smirk) issue - how can they verify it!

BTW, just kidding

So all three ... (1)

NikeHerc (694644) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627612)

So all three folks up there are without the internet?

(Just jokin', folks. Canada has been the best northern neighbor the U.S. ever had!)

Re:So all three ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627908)

Not to mention the only.

Re:So all three ... (1)

mr1911 (1942298) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628404)

Whoosh

Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (1)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627640)

Dont they have undersea fiber connections to the country, and DSL and stuff? Or even dialup? Why would half the country use only Satellite as thier Internet connection?

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627700)

Because of the ridiculously low population density more than 100 miles from the American border.

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627874)

The American border? That would imply the border between America and something else, which isn't actually the case.

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (3, Informative)

LikwidCirkel (1542097) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627712)

This only effects remote northern communities where fiber is unfeasible. It's around 60% of the area and much less than 1% of the population.

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (1)

Lieutenant_Dan (583843) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627842)

In even some newer communities in south-western Ontario, you couldn't get highspeed Internet via DSL/cable/fibre/WiFi. I know of a couple rural spots around Guelph and Cambridge where folks have sat feeds (plus the old phone lines for upstream) for Internet. So even within the 100km (and less than one hour's drive from Toronto) range from the US border, sometimes your options are limited

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (1)

Dinghy (2233934) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627764)

It generally has to do with population density. This is northern Canada.

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627768)

Dont they have undersea fiber connections to the country, and DSL and stuff?
Or even dialup?

Why would half the country use only Satellite as thier Internet connection?

Northern Canada does not mean the Northern half of Canada. It means the very very far north. Communities are very remote, populations are tiny.

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627778)

If you consider that 'half the country' resides in Northern Canada... you're sorely mistaken.

I'd hazard a guess and say that less than 15% of the Canadian population is affected by this issue.

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (2, Informative)

isorox (205688) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627786)

Dont they have undersea fiber connections to the country, and DSL and stuff?
Or even dialup?

Why would half the country use only Satellite as thier Internet connection?

99.999999% of Candians live within 100 miles of the U.S. Border, in towns and cities, with cable and dsl.

There are 6,784 people living north of about 52N. Even some of these people may have cable and satellite in their towns, but the towns rely on satellites for their uplinks.

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627792)

Not sure if trolling.

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627800)

When they say Northern Canada, they mean the very top: Nunavut, N.W.T. and Yukon. Majority of Canada is serviced by fiber, not so "dark ages" as you think.

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (1)

waterford0069 (580760) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627838)

You're trolling, right? You know that North Dakota has no ocean view.

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (1)

InsertWittyNameHere (1438813) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627850)

Too expensive to run/maintain cables to every city/town/village in the north. If you look at this map [satbeams.com] you can see the coverage you get for the cost of one satellite.

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627858)

Northern Canada. Were talking about nunavat, nwt, and the Yukon. It's not half of Canada. The reason is because way up there there are few cities and most of it is isolated towns and Indian reserves. It's a logistical nightmare to string fiber optics up there. The vast majority of Canadians including me have had no trouble at all

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (1)

defiantredpill (2056302) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628036)

I'm from Windsor Ontario (Border city to Detroit), and never meet any one that had to use satellite based Internet, Most everyone has DSL, Cable, WiMax like Wireless and of course 3G etc. My guess is that 90% of Canadians affected by this live in igloos. ;)

Re:Is the internet in Canada 100% satellite? (1)

robthebloke (1308483) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628046)

Dont they have undersea fiber connections to the country, and DSL and stuff?

Yup, it runs under the Canadian ocean which entirely separates the continent of the USA from the continent of canada.

Or even dialup?

This is no time for pizza.

Why would half the country use only Satellite as thier Internet connection?

Because the other half are running away from man eating polar bears.

Summary missed a few key words (2)

ColoradoAuthor (682295) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627666)

Only those communities that are remote enough to depend solely on satellite are affected. FTA: "Northwestel said all communities across Nunavut, N.W.T. and Yukon that receive their long distance calling and data service via satellite are affected."

But Finally.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627668)

... a decent Internet and Phone coverage for all those on vacation under the Sun. Oh wait..

Northern Canada (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627696)

Uhm, so that's what like 47 people?

Safety mode? (1)

Bucky24 (1943328) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627710)

The satellite went into safety mode and moved from pointing to the earth to pointing to the sun.

Why on earth is this what it does when it goes into safety mode? How is that supposed to help the problem/prevent it from becoming worse?

Re:Safety mode? (1)

cdrudge (68377) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627784)

From the article comments:
Note that the satellite is pointing in the wrong direction on purpose. This is standard procedure to prevent a malfunctioning satellite from interfering with other services.

Re:Safety mode? (1)

Bucky24 (1943328) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627834)

Ahhh ok... Should have read TFA. Thanks.

Re:Safety mode? (1)

Ashenkase (2008188) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627968)

Because when a satellite is put into safe mode all non essential functions are disabled, which means no on station maneuvering. Putting the sat into a sunward facing orientation (for much of its orbit) ensures the satellite won't experience any problems due to lack of power. Having the satellite pointing sunward for long durations in its orbit ensure the batteries are juiced and comms can be ready and waiting for commands.

Re:Safety mode? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628104)

Why on earth is this what it does when it goes into safety mode? How is that supposed to help the problem/prevent it from becoming worse?

I can make a few guesses. It might be that it is best to have it point in a well known direction, and the Sun is the easiest target to find. When trying to regain control over a satellite you'll need to be able to communicate with it, so you need to know where the antenna is pointing. Then I suppose you can relay the command through another satellite going between the target and the Sun. (There won't always be another satellite in that direction, but as they are all in an orbit around the Earth, occasionally there will be). Another possible reason is that they want to avoid the signal being sent to some undesired destination on Earth where it could interfere with other signals on the same frequency.

Re:Safety mode? (1)

kiwimate (458274) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628120)

Safety for external functions. It isn't so much designed to help the satellite's problem as to prevent other services from being disrupted.

Oh goodie! (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627734)

An opportunity to slander our norther neighbors without retribution. :)

Canadians can't play hockey! Canadian beer tastes like pee! Tree sap is not mothers milk!

hahahaha naner naner naner. :P

Re:Oh goodie! (2)

LikwidCirkel (1542097) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627822)

I'm in Canada and I received you loud and clear. Now brace yourself while I write letters to my local newspaper about how offended I am.

Re:Oh goodie! (1)

BenSchuarmer (922752) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627824)

Most songs by the band Rush sound alike!

(phew, I've been wanting to get that off my chest for a long time)

Re:Oh goodie! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627856)

Wait, there's more than one song by Rush?

Re:Oh goodie! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628426)

If you listen to classic rock stations, you will learn that there is only one song by every band that ever existed.

Re:Oh goodie! (4, Funny)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627958)

Sticks and stones may break our bones, but our health care at least is free!

Re:Oh goodie! (1)

thatnerdguy (551590) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628162)

Damnit, where are my mod points when I need them! Funniest comment I've read today!

Re:Oh goodie! (1)

spire3661 (1038968) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628164)

If by free you mean paid for by every single citizen, sick or not, then yes its 'free'

Re:Oh goodie! (-1, Flamebait)

LVSlushdat (854194) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628294)

.... but our health care at least is free!

Such as it is.. Do ya ever wonder why so many of your Canadian compadres come down to the good ole USA for their medical care?
Geez.. I Can't WAIT till Oblowme-Care comes to Amerika and we get to experience what you poor schlubs in Canada and the UK have
been afflicted with for so long....

Re:Oh goodie! (1)

davegravy (1019182) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628118)

You see, it's the northern part of Canada (furthest from you) which has no internet. Between them and you is southern Canada, who happens to still have internet, as well as an overly-extreme pride for hockey and beer. Of course, I wouldn't expect an American to comprehend his relative geographical location :)

attitude control issue? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627736)

it'll point wherever it bloody wants to point.

Northern Canada != Canada (5, Informative)

mclearn (86140) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627810)

Remember, Canada is a big place. 75% of all Canadians live within 90 miles of the US border. So keep this in mind while you read all of the comments saying what a calamity this is for Canadians. Northern Canada -- and I say this as a Canadian, though some may disagree (like we disagree about what it means to be in Eastern Canada or Western Canada) -- generally are those who live above 55-60 degrees N which is an exceptionally small percentage of the total population.

Well that explains... (1)

kamikaze2112 (792393) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627860)

...Why I can't get any HD Channels on my Shaw Direct (used to be Star Choice) Satellite TV. According to Wikipedia, Anik F2 carries French programming and HDTV Channels. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaw_Direct [wikipedia.org] .
I wonder how long something like this takes to get sorted out?

WOW bad headling and BAD summary (4, Informative)

BagOBones (574735) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627892)

Should probably read....
Remote communities in Canada's far north without internet.

Any major populated area connected by land line will not be impacted... In fact I would argue that nothing larger than a "Town" is likely impacted impacted.

Re:WOW bad headling and BAD summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628144)

yeah and who gives a flying fluck about *those* ppl?!

Rogue Satellite (5, Funny)

davegravy (1019182) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627902)

Anik F2 satellite experienced an attitude control issue

Great, so now we have self-aware machines with personality disorders orbiting us? Who's gonna capitalize on the budding satellite anger-management industry?

A loss of communications... (1)

waterford0069 (580760) | more than 3 years ago | (#37627944)

OB,

A loss of communications can mean only one thing. Invasion!

Didn't know they had electricity in Canada.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37627994)

I didn't kn0w they had electricity in Canada let alone access to the internet!

Single point of failure? (1)

QuietLagoon (813062) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628006)

Who designed that comm system?

Re:Single point of failure? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628416)

Why would you invest in more than a single point (so another satelite) when the population is arguably minimal? You would never recoup the investment.

Are you in technology per chance? ;)

Attitude adjustment (1)

Frenzied Apathy (2473340) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628044)

experienced an attitude control issue

Well, maybe if someone went up there and gave it an attitude adjustment, then they'd get their Internet back! :P

That's what radio is for. (2)

couchslug (175151) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628158)

If you want reliable backup comms in the wilderness you use radio.

The reliance on phones and internet is convenient, but if you can afford those you can afford radio gear and spend some time learning how to use it.

Amateur radio operators were the original nerds long before computers existed.

http://www.rac.ca/ [www.rac.ca]

http://www.arrl.org/ [arrl.org]

So it went from F2 to FU2? (1)

Ardx (954221) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628190)

nt.

Shaw Broadcast Services uses Anik F2 so cable (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628216)

Shaw Broadcast Services uses Anik F2 so cable customs tv may be missing out out on channels and maybe US NHL CENTER ICE customs will not be able to get games on Canada channels.

Shaw Direct (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628232)

Anik F1 and Anik F2 provide television services for Shaw Direct throughout Canada on the Ku band. Might be more than just Internet and telephony interrupted in the north.

http://www.satbeams.com/footprints?beam=5619

Oh god, the inhumanity! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628242)

Did they at least know Steve Jobs died?! Please tell me they found out!

Internet dies and suddenly it's back to the stone ages.

I wondered why everything seemed better today... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37628244)

I guess it was those damn Canadians this whole time.

Canada should use the Australian Outback solution (1)

bobs666 (146801) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628338)

Go read this page [dawn.com] about how "The humble old rooftop TV aerial could bring superfast Internet to even the most remote shack in the Australian Outback and help solve the problem of how to connect isolated communities across the globe."

Rogers Sports net SD / HD / NHL HD feeds are on F2 (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 3 years ago | (#37628414)

http://www.shawbroadcast.ca/docs/signal_lists/hd_signal_list_transport_oct11_e.pdf [shawbroadcast.ca]

The NHL is big in Canada so like the feeds will have to move and other channels may get kicked off air.

I know that iN DEMAND uses shaw broadcast to get the feeds for the CBC, TSN, rogers sports net games.

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