Beta

Slashdot: News for Nerds

×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Chinese Blogger Becomes Celebrity Exposing Corruption

samzenpus posted about a year and a half ago | from the you-can't-handle-the-truth dept.

China 143

hackingbear writes "The New York Times reports the story of a Chinese blogger named Zhu Ruifeng who has become an overnight celebrity in China. He posted a secretly recorded video of an 18-year-old woman having sex with a 57-year-old official from the southwestern municipality of Chongqing. The official, along with 10 others, lost their jobs and are now under investigation. Mr. Zhu says ordinary citizens have come to rely on the Internet for retribution, even if it often amounts to mob justice. 'We used to say that when you have a problem, go to the police,' he said. 'Now we say when you have a problem, go to the netizens.' He has become a litmus test of how committed China's new leaders are in their battle against corruption — and whether they can tolerate populist crusaders like Mr. Zhu."

cancel ×

143 comments

piss frosty, my friends (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42816793)

fp!

you won't ever hear what happens (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42816803)

to the blogger, though... some day (soon if he keeps it up), he'll simply "disappear".....

Re:you won't ever hear what happens (1)

similar_name (1164087) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817241)

Or he'll make a parody of Gangnam Style [telegraph.co.uk] .

Re:you won't ever hear what happens (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817309)

Maybe I've seen too many movies, or underestimate the boldness of the Chinese government, but it seems like there must be some threshold of notoriety where you're beyond "troublesome but mostly unknown", such that they can't just disappear you. Now you have to die in an unfortunate accident.

Re:you won't ever hear what happens (4, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817517)

Read up on Lin Biao. Nobody in China is so big that they can't die in a "plain crash".

Re:you won't ever hear what happens (4, Funny)

drkim (1559875) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817717)

...Nobody in China is so big that they can't die in a "plain crash".

Or, if you're a real big-shot, you can have an exceptional crash!

Re:you won't ever hear what happens (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817735)

That was 40 years ago. China changed a lot since then. Disappearing anyone too famous is asking for trouble. Character assassination works much better.

Re:you won't ever hear what happens (1, Redundant)

cayenne8 (626475) | about a year and a half ago | (#42820179)

Still, I'm not understanding why the official got axed.

I mean, a 57 year old man getting it on with a sweet, young 18 year old chick is NOT character assassination, hell, I would thing the rest of the party leads would be high fiving him!!!

:)

You know...the old "pictures or it didn't happen" meme.

Re:you won't ever hear what happens (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42818783)

Read up on Lin Biao. Nobody in China is so big that they can't die in a "plain crash".

How do you know that it was unceremoneous?

Re:you won't ever hear what happens (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817759)

to the blogger, though... some day (soon if he keeps it up), he'll simply "disappear".....

I'm sure they're quite happy to throw a few minor officials under the bus to appear to fight corruption. They can hold him up as an example - see nothing happens when you expose corruption - we are honest.....that is until he decides to expose someone higher up....those are the people who disappear!

Link (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42816823)

So where's the link to the video in question?

Re:Link (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42816951)

At least his blog address was in the article (jdwsy.com [jdwsy.com] ). If someone here understands Chinese, maybe the video could be found.

Re:Link (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817055)

Re:Link (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817393)

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xvef3w_bo-xilai-linked-to-chongqing-s-sacked-sex-tape-official_news#.URM3aR25_ss

Re:Link (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42819059)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S86ZmqWLJeE

He's not a hero, (4, Funny)

Tablizer (95088) | about a year and a half ago | (#42816837)

...he just wanted some porn. Exposing corruption was an accident :-)

Re:He's not a hero, (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42816933)

Well, I RTFA and I didn't see any corruption specified. It is presented as though it is a known fact. What does the sex have to do with the corruption? It is just mentioned to be salacious. Shouldn't I (or anyone) be able to have sex with whoever they want? The article more or less says that ugly people can't have sex. It shouldn't matter that someone works for the government.

Re:He's not a hero, (4, Informative)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817113)

Either you are pretending that you RTFA or you you have a deficit in the reading comprehension area

The compromising images of Lei Zhengfu, the Chongqing official caught having sex with the 18-year-old, have been an anti-graft jackpot for Mr. Zhu: 11 officials have resigned or been fired for their role in what was a honey trap organized by business executives seeking to blackmail powerful bureaucrats to win government contracts. The scheme ultimately failed, but the tapes ended up in the hands of the Chongqing police. After investigators failed to act, Mr. Zhu says, a disgruntled person inside the department sent the evidence his way.

So, let's count:
1. successful bribery - (otherwise why 11 resignations/sacking after the tapes containing the sex scene ended at the Chongqing police?)
2. blackmail attempt (even if the blackmail scheme failed)
3. police failing to act

To my count, that's at least 3 cases I'd classify as corruption

Re:He's not a hero, (1)

Iamthecheese (1264298) | about a year and a half ago | (#42818485)

So your argument is, they act guilty therefore they're guilty? There's no evidence here and any presumption of guilt is wrong.

Re:He's not a hero, (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year and a half ago | (#42818609)

So your argument is, they act guilty therefore they're guilty?

No, that's not what I argued.

There's no evidence here and any presumption of guilt is wrong.

You are correct in what you say... too pity is irrelevant. And it's irrelevant because at no point I implied anything about guilt.

To make clear the terminology: what I saw and pointed out in TFA is evidence of corruption (enough to make allegations of corruption) but not proof of corruption (which is, indeed, required to establish the guilt)... I trust you will be able to perceive the difference.

To put the things better, I was answering to a claim that TFA doesn't contain any reference to corruption.

Well, I RTFA and I didn't see any corruption specified.

I hope that my previous post do provide a proof on the contrary (i.e. the article contains at least allegations of corruption). Other than this, there are no other things which I wanted said in or understood from my post. Are we clear now?

Re:He's not a hero, (2)

PPH (736903) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821219)

what was a honey trap organized by business executives seeking to blackmail powerful bureaucrats to win government contracts. The scheme ultimately failed, but the tapes ended up in the hands of the Chongqing police. After investigators failed to act, Mr. Zhu says, a disgruntled person inside the department sent the evidence his way.

Sounds like the businessmen provided some official with an 18 year old, recorded the encounter and tried to blackmail him. But he didn't give in to their demands, so they gave the tapes to the police. "Look, we got this guy laid but he didn't come through with the contracts".

The businessmen need to be arrested. Maybe a few of the government officials needed to resign if they took the bait. But if the blackmail scheme "failed", I'd give the official involved a medal. He got laid and didn't sell out. The fact that none of the businessmen were rounded up in this fiasco sounds like the police were complicit in the blackmail scheme.

Heck, send as many 18 yo girls as you want to my house. You're not getting any preferential treatment. The only people leaving satisfied will be me and the women.

Stay low (5, Insightful)

kcelery (410487) | about a year and a half ago | (#42816853)

As a whistle blower, keeping his head low is mandatory in China.

The guy who reported the milk factory misuse of melamine was murdered.
Rumor said there was a bounty of 1/2 million RMB on his life.

http://ntdtv.org/en/news/china/2012-11-23/china-s-toxic-milk-whistleblower-murdered.html

Re:Stay low (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42816971)

That's what she said!!!!!

Re:Stay low (5, Insightful)

Calibax (151875) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817409)

Almost certainly the guy who posed the video is being used by someone who passed him the tape.

The real whistle blower is probably a higher level functionary who wanted the tape released to discredit a political enemy and able to protect this guy, for now. How long the poster will continue to be protected is anyone's guess.

Re:Stay low (1)

HolyMackerelBatman! (1291838) | about a year and a half ago | (#42818589)

How very cynical of you. However I'm inclined to agree.

Re:Stay low (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42818307)

Note that NTD is founded by the Falun Gong and biased.

This South China Morning Post (Hong Kong) report [scmp.com] makes the attack sound more complicated, with his wife being charged, though also with reports that others were present.

Though obviously that could all be a cover-up, and I don't trust what the cops in China say..

how will they stop recording. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42816855)

The police and other corrupt officials are quickly assimilating to live video recordings and the like. I wish I knew more on how they will deal with this particular issue ? Does any fellow LEO have any advise they can give ?

Balls (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42816861)

this guy's got 'em

Re:Balls (3, Insightful)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year and a half ago | (#42818007)

But for how long?

But how long will this last? (4, Insightful)

Calibax (151875) | about a year and a half ago | (#42816879)

The newly minted Standing Committee of the Politburu (the 9 folks who rule China) have made it clear that corruption is a major issue. However, previous Standing Committees have said the same and even started efforts to tackle it. These efforts haven't lasted long enough to make a small dent in the problem, never mind eradicate it.

The problem is that all levels of politicians and bureaucrats benefit greatly from corruption. Lower level bureaucrats want to become rich, higher level bureaucrats and they have no reason to rock the boat for themselves or their bureaucratic and political superiors.

I wonder how long these sorts of grass roots efforts will be tolerated. China has repeatedly shown that they can bury anything on their portion of the internet given sufficient incentive.

Re:But how long will this last? (1)

smegfault (2001252) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817103)

The newly minted Standing Committee of the Politburu (the 9 folks who rule China) have made it clear that corruption is a major issue. However, previous Standing Committees have said the same and even started efforts to tackle it. These efforts haven't lasted long enough to make a small dent in the problem, never mind eradicate it.

It's the same old solution. Denounce, deport, change nothing. Wash, rinse, repeat.

Re:But how long will this last? (3, Interesting)

hairyfish (1653411) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817515)

The last Chinese revolution was only 40 years ago, the one before that was only 60 years ago. "Change nothing" is hardly the right phrase to use when talking about Chinese political history.

Re:But how long will this last? (4, Informative)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817221)

The newly minted Standing Committee of the Politburu (the 9 folks who rule China) have made it clear that corruption is a major issue.

When Xi Jinping spoke out about corruption, in the very next breath he emphasized that "stability" was more important. That is understood by Chinese people to mean nothing much will be done. In the previous administration, many people looked at the premier, Wei Jiabao [wikipedia.org] , as a champion of integrity, and it was a big shock to a lot of Chinese when the NY Times exposed his billions in overseas accounts. Xi Jinping's response to Wei Jiabao's corruption is not to hold him accountable, but rather to try to block the Chinese people from reading the NY times. The culture of corruption and impunity goes all the way to the top.

Most "anti-corruption" drives in China are used to scapegoat political enemies, and even execute a few people (kill the chicken to scare the monkey). But there is rarely any reform to the system that made the corruption possible. For instance, when thousands of people died in the Sichuan Earthquake [wikipedia.org] because building inspectors had been bribed, a few people were shot. But the real solution (making building inspection reports into public records freely accessible to anyone with a browser) did not happen.

Re:But how long will this last? (0)

hackingbear (988354) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817783)

Most "anti-corruption" drives in China are used to scapegoat political enemies

Probably, but isn't that a form of balance of power? How's that different from two party election system? How do other democracies, like India, Philippine, Mexico, do in this regard? (Hint: they rank even lower than China's in the clean government index.)

Stability is also important. As much as you and me would like to see the CCP fail, it will be tragic to the 1.6 billion people if civil wars break out, causing massive death and chaos. At this point, the CCP is also too big to fail just like our mega banks. The process has to be gradual. For example, Hong Kong was very corrupt back in 1960's; the HK government tried to crack down on corruption but met with resistance and chaos; eventually the HK government had to pardon all corrupted officials and police. Today, HK is one of the cleanest government in the world. The same thing happened in Taiwan and S. Korea. The same thing will need to happen in China too.

Regarding the GP's comment, this round of effort is a little different than the past in its wide and deep coverage by both official media and the Internet. Like all of our problems in this world, when a problem hits the main street headline day and night, it is near the time of a solution.

But I do have hope that this will be taken care of. It is a natural evolution of a developed economy, independent of what political party is in power. Taiwan/SK went in the same process when their economy became developed, China is near that stage. You need to trust the natural force.

Re:But how long will this last? (3, Insightful)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817889)

Probably, but isn't that a form of balance of power?

A form of balance of power? Scape-goating political enemies and having them killed and exiled? The idea of balance of power is to separate the powers so that no group gains so much power that they can destroy their political enemies. It's the opposite of what you think it is.

How's that different from two party election system?

In a properly designed system, the party can be out of power without worrying about death or exile. Believe it or not, that's a huge difference.

For example, Hong Kong was very corrupt back in 1960's; the HK government tried to crack down on corruption but met with resistance and chaos; eventually the HK government had to pardon all corrupted officials and police. Today, HK is one of the cleanest government in the world. The same thing happened in Taiwan and S. Korea.

You do realize the ex-president of Taiwan is currently in jail for embezzlement, right? Your ability to gather accurate information isn't exactly showing itself today.....

Like all of our problems in this world, when a problem hits the main street headline day and night, it is near the time of a solution.

The hope is that eventually China will enter the modern world and have a modern democracy. Unfortunately, there are many problems that are constantly in the main street headline, and still haven't been resolved. I leave to you as an exercise to find some.

Re:But how long will this last? (1)

hackingbear (988354) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817951)

A form of balance of power can also mean different groups are watching over each other, regardless of motivation. If they can balance each other, that means no groups gain too much power.

In a properly designed system, the party can be out of power without worrying about death or exile. Believe it or not, that's a huge difference.
[...]
You do realize the ex-president of Taiwan is currently in jail for embezzlement, right? Your ability to gather accurate information isn't exactly showing itself today.....

The party out of power has to worry about going to jail. They would have to worry about death too if death sentence is allowed for corruption, as in China. And this ex-president started his act after Taiwan completed its transformation long time ago. Just like a corrupt official in HK today wouldn't be pardoned anymore. The reset button is hit once and hopefully only once.

Unfortunately, there are many problems that are constantly in the main street headline, and still haven't been resolved. I leave to you as an exercise to find some.

There are of course constant headlines, but the ones become really loud -- like airline safety at 9/11, pending collapse of economy in 2008, US debt in 2011 -- will be taken care of. (I should have emphasize the really loud part better.) They don't necessary be solved right the way but the various solutions are often created to at least make the problem much less dangerous.

Re:But how long will this last? (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817989)

A form of balance of power can also mean different groups are watching over each other, regardless of motivation. If they can balance each other, that means no groups gain too much power

Feel free to define things however you want.

Re:But how long will this last? (1)

ShieldW0lf (601553) | about a year and a half ago | (#42819279)

A form of balance of power can also mean different groups are watching over each other, regardless of motivation. If they can balance each other, that means no groups gain too much power

Feel free to define things however you want.

Sun Tzu would have approved of that definition.

Re:But how long will this last? (2)

Koreantoast (527520) | about a year and a half ago | (#42820305)

You are being very selective regarding South Korea. The big leaps in cleaning of corruption came hand-in-hand with freedom of speech, heavy social unrest and democratization. There was continuous pressure on the government for social change in the form of protests and social disobedience, and numerous senior government officials, including two previous presidents, were eventually rounded up and imprisoned. When the Chinese speak of stability, they speak of resisting the very elements that pressured the ROK government to clean up its system. Modern Korea's freewheeling freedom of speech continues to hold the government accountable. The way I see it, the CCP has two choices: they need to either loosen up the control on their system, or the people will eventually rise up and force them to do it. If you truly care about national stability, you would want to see the CCP allow for greater transparency.

Re:But how long will this last? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42820279)

"But the real solution (making building inspection reports into public records freely accessible to anyone with a browser) did not happen."

      Make It Happen!

Celle

Re:But how long will this last? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817371)

American corruption [techdirt.com] can be pretty blatant and no one seems to care. And it's not like no one close to the White House ever died mysteriously. One can only wonder what goes on that we don't even know about.

Re:But how long will this last? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817467)

China has one political party. But in America there are two political parties who really dislike each other. Corruption in the other party would be shouted to every media outlet that would listen to them. In fact it is, whether it's there or not.

Re:But how long will this last? (1)

RoknrolZombie (2504888) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817679)

Unless both parties are have an understood agreement that neither party can lose as long as the public does. Kind of like professional wrestling - people get hurt and there's some pride on the line, but at the end of the day everyone is getting paid.

That being said, we've seen a few politicians in the last year or two that seem to have woken up to the reality of awful the US Govt has become and are saying so. We can hope the trend continues.

Re:But how long will this last? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42821123)

You are absolutely correct. No one who lives in the US can ever ever comment about corruption anywhere else because we have it here too. Thank you so much for setting us all straight and we patiently yet eagerly await your next profound declaration.

Re:But how long will this last? (2)

Smauler (915644) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817497)

Corruption, when done well, is almost impossible to detect.

The thing is, it's so badly done and rife in China that there are lots of examples. This has happened to every society moving to a large scale capitalistic economy... it's a symptom of the system.

I'm not saying the system is necessarily bad (in my opinion regulated capitalism is the best economic model we have), but when you start capitalism, it's difficult to regulate... and lots of people can gain lots of money and power. This has been seen time and time again. Russia is a decent example.

Re:But how long will this last? (5, Informative)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817703)

Corruption, when done well, is almost impossible to detect.

Regulation, when done well, is almost impossible to corrupt. If you want to start a business in China, you will have to pay a bribe. I have started several business in the USA, and there is no where in the system for a bribe. The law says that the county clerk must issue the license. They have no discretion. When I lived in Shanghai, I had to pay a bribe so my kids could attend school. The rules are murky and unwritten, so the school staff has huge discretion of who can attend. In America the rules for admission are written down, clear, and publicly available. The system in China is designed to be corruptible, while the American system is designed to prevent it.

In America, nearly all of my interaction with local, state and federal government is through websites. It is difficult to get an under-the-table bribe through a website. When I have to deal face-to-face, such as at the DMV, it is at a public window in full view of other people. When I have had to deal with government officials in China, they often will lead applicants one at a time into private offices, out of view of the public. The corruption is pervasive and systematic, and their procedures are designed to facilitate it.

 

Re:But how long will this last? (4, Interesting)

hackingbear (988354) | about a year and a half ago | (#42818063)

Agree! No, there is no corruption in the US. There are only political contributions which is perfectly legal. And you only need to pay it when you need to change the law to your flavor. There is no political contribution in China, there is only corruption which could get you executed. That's the differences in the system designs. I actually think China will eventually go the US system -- election + political contributions. Not because it is good, but because it is more stable.

Re:But how long will this last? (1)

operagost (62405) | about a year and a half ago | (#42820999)

He didn't say there was no corruption in the USA, Captain Straw Man.

Re:But how long will this last? (5, Interesting)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year and a half ago | (#42818133)

"One of the things I have always found troubling about Westerners doing business in emerging market countries is that they sometimes take an almost perverse pride in discussing payoffs to government officials. It is as though their having paid a bribe is a symbol of their international sophistication and insider knowledge. Yet, countless times when I am told of the bribe, I know the very same thing could almost certainly have been accomplished without a bribe."
--Dan Harris, chinalawblog.com

Re:But how long will this last? (3, Insightful)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about a year and a half ago | (#42819083)

"Yet, countless times when I am told of the bribe, I know the very same thing could almost certainly have been accomplished without a bribe."

Without the context, that sounds like a very poor understanding of 3rd world bribery. There are basically two kinds of bribes -- bribes to get an official to do something illegal like skip a building inspection but sign the paperwork anyway, and bribes to get an official to simply do their job like show up to do that building inspection without waiting a year.

BOTH types of bribery are common enough in the third world, but the later is practically de rigueur because most government employees are not paid a living wage. It is almost like tipping a waiter.

Re:But how long will this last? (0)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year and a half ago | (#42819385)

You don't need to pay bribes in China. Anyone who says so is an idiot, or gets a frisson of pleasure from paying so he can be the big sophisticated guy and say, "Yeah, I paid a bribe."

Re:But how long will this last? (4, Informative)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about a year and a half ago | (#42820987)

You don't need to pay bribes in China.

I lived in China for several years. You don't have to pay bribes if you don't want anything from the government. But if you want to send your kids to a public school, and their paternal grandfather didn't live in the district in 1949, then you pay a bribe. If you have a business that requires any kind of license (and they all do), then you either pay a bribe to get the license, or you pay a bribe to the cop on the corner to ignore the fact that you don't have one. A foreigner visiting China will not normally have to pay any bribes, but that is because they don't have the kinds of interactions with the government that require bribes, and also because foreigners are treated differently. Most Chinese people don't consider their country to be corrupt either. They refer to the bribes as "guanxi", or "relationship building", and to them it is so normal that they just accept it as the way it is, and the way it is supposed to be.

Re:But how long will this last? (0)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | about a year and a half ago | (#42818829)

Regulation, when done well, is almost impossible to corrupt.

I'm sorry but that statement needs some evidence to support it, as my experience indicates that increasing government regulation always results in increasing corruption.

Re:But how long will this last? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42820719)

The poster illustrated already. Sunlight is an excellent disinfectant. Forcing everything to be done in the open and audited makes it obvious if you are corrupt and so it's far easier to stay straight.

As several posters have mentioned there's a certain sort of person who is proud of having bribed officials, they think it looks wordly to say "Of course, I had to pay them off" when, as mentioned above so many times, in reality you can just say "No".

Many first world countries, including the US and UK now have laws which _require_ companies in that country to prevent their employees and agents from engaging in corruption anywhere in the ENTIRE WORLD. That means if you're a contractor for a Big American Corporation and you're out in Bumfuck Nowhere and an official suggests that maybe things would get done quicker if you gave them an envelope with $5000 in notes inside (legal term: a "facilitation payment", but basically just another type of bribe), you can BE FIRED for paying the money. If your bosses "turn a blind eye" while you put the $5000 as "miscellaneous expenses" on the contract they can GO TO JAIL for behaviour likely to cause or conceal corruption.

This is genuinely a big deal, the sort of thing that topples governments, hence the law forbidding you from fucking things up.

Re:But how long will this last? (1)

roman_mir (125474) | about a year and a half ago | (#42820701)

Regulation, when done well, is almost impossible to corrupt.

- ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha!

Regulation, when done well, is indistinguishable from corruption. Fixed that for you.

Dude, regulation IS corruption.

Re:But how long will this last? (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817529)

Corruption in local officials long predates the Communists.

I'm sort of confused (1)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about a year and a half ago | (#42816889)

How is a politician having sex corruption? It's hypocrisy if they are the family values party line, and if they are married its cheating but at best I could say he was exposing a scandal not exposing corruption. Now if he was taking bribes, or something that might be corruption.

Re:I'm sort of confused (2)

elsuperjefe (1487639) | about a year and a half ago | (#42816989)

I believe sex with the 18 year old girl was offered as a bribe payment for lucrative contracts. The official caught with his pants down apparently had so much money that monetary payments no longer interested him...

Re:I'm sort of confused (1)

smegfault (2001252) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817119)

If he had plenty of money and 18-year old girls are his thing... Why didn't he just hire an 18-year old prostitute? Must be a power thing.

Re:I'm sort of confused (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817277)

Girls who pay with boy for business is different level of prositute, more expensive ones if you like.

Re:I'm sort of confused (2)

TapeCutter (624760) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817339)

Money can be tracked more easily than hookers.

Re:I'm sort of confused (3, Informative)

Kozz (7764) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817025)

From TFA:

The compromising images of Lei Zhengfu, the Chongqing official caught having sex with the 18-year-old, have been an anti-graft jackpot for Mr. Zhu: 11 officials have resigned or been fired for their role in what was a honey trap organized by business executives seeking to blackmail powerful bureaucrats to win government contracts. The scheme ultimately failed, but the tapes ended up in the hands of the Chongqing police. After investigators failed to act, Mr. Zhu says, a disgruntled person inside the department sent the evidence his way.

Re:I'm sort of confused (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42820059)

"a honey trap organized by business executives seeking to blackmail"

        And what happened to the executives? Death I hope. You can't hope to stop corruption if you don't deal with with the people who think they can get away with attempting it. Yes, the officials should be disciplined but so should those that enable it as people can only take temptation for so long before they break. Especially when the system makes it easy for them to break by teaching them it is ok and compensating them little to make their job and life bearable. Everyone has various and changing needs and wants that are often ignored to everyone's peril.

Re:I'm sort of confused (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42820155)

"Everyone has various and changing needs and wants that are often ignored to everyone's peril."

Forgot to sign it.

Celle

PS Execs often seem to live like there's no tomorrow and take risks like it. Sometimes reminders that life is more than business is required. Although death is probably the wrong way to do it, including wiping the family. Maybe reducing them to the income of a street sweeper/lowly position with no authority would be better. I'm just getting sick of seeing corruption in all places.

Re:I'm sort of confused (2)

_Ludwig (86077) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817027)

Yeah, the article doesn't really say, although it does call him "memorably unattractive."

The compromising images of Lei Zhengfu, the Chongqing official caught having sex with the 18-year-old, have been an anti-graft jackpot for Mr. Zhu: 11 officials have resigned or been fired for their role in what was a honey trap organized by business executives seeking to blackmail powerful bureaucrats to win government contracts.

suggests that the executives plied the officials with young women in putative exchange for contracts, but they were actually trying to expose the officials so the execs would have fewer palms to grease. It doesn't explicitly say that though.

Re:I'm sort of confused (2)

fermion (181285) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817117)

Unlike politicians in the US and many western countries, who are mostly elected to serve but are free to do as they please, politicians in other countries are often seen as 'chosen' to lead the country, like a king or queen. While behavior might be acceptable to a governor, it would not be acceptable for a queen.

So it does not really matter if the girl was a gift or a bribe, or just someone who wanted a favor, it has to be seen as corruption due to the circumstances and the power of the leaders in China. We assume that congressperson in the US are routinely bribes with trips and sex partners. However, as the power of a politician is limited, and they are not really servants of the state, it is not automatically corruption when they are caught, and it si hard to prove.

Look at it this way. Right now a lot of military people are have sexual encounters with those who rank below them. As they are being paid to do a job, and the US is not in the business of pimping, these encounters whether consensual, a form of quid pro quo, or rape is kind of immaterial. It is corruption. Like for powerful officials.

Re:I'm sort of confused (1)

Smauler (915644) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817541)

Unlike politicians in the US and many western countries, who are mostly elected to serve but are free to do as they please, politicians in other countries are often seen as 'chosen' to lead the country, like a king or queen. While behavior might be acceptable to a governor, it would not be acceptable for a queen.

Kings and/or queens don't actually have any real power anywhere in the world. Also, plenty of kings and queens have behaved badly.

Re:I'm sort of confused (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42818677)

Unlike politicians in the US and many western countries, who are mostly elected to serve but are free to do as they please, politicians in other countries are often seen as 'chosen' to lead the country, like a king or queen. While behavior might be acceptable to a governor, it would not be acceptable for a queen.

Kings and/or queens don't actually have any real power anywhere in the world. Also, plenty of kings and queens have behaved badly.

Absolute monarchies still exist - look to the Middle East. Even under more limited forms, some monarchs have real-world powers.

Re:I'm sort of confused (2)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817127)

TFA

The compromising images of Lei Zhengfu, the Chongqing official caught having sex with the 18-year-old, have been an anti-graft jackpot for Mr. Zhu: 11 officials have resigned or been fired for their role in what was a honey trap organized by business executives seeking to blackmail powerful bureaucrats to win government contracts. The scheme ultimately failed, but the tapes ended up in the hands of the Chongqing police. After investigators failed to act, Mr. Zhu says, a disgruntled person inside the department sent the evidence his way.

Re:I'm sort of confused (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817441)

This is total malarkey. Unsurprisingly it's New York Times yet again.
Half the politicians in this country have dalliances (Jefferson, JFK, Eisenhower, Clinton, ...none lost their job), and the other half just haven't been discovered yet.

It's CHINA (2)

itsphilip (934602) | about a year and a half ago | (#42816947)

Guy will be dead within a year

I kind of like Chinese people.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42816955)

at least more than the Chinese leaders.

Re:I kind of like Chinese people.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817049)

This can be meta phrased as "I like the people, at least, more than the leaders." and applied to just about every country in the world.

Tell me a place where the leaders are not corrupt, power mad narcissists and the people they lead really like them and I'll be surprised. However, I doubt you'll find such a place.

Good about the angle on this one (1, Interesting)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year and a half ago | (#42816975)

Interesting angle on this one! This guy is actually the hero. Amazing! I don't think I could have imagined a scenario by which a man secretly tapes an 18-year-old girl being raped, posts it on the internet without her consent, and is viewed positively by Western society...but here it is! I was thinking the man would be a hate object like when this scenario usually happens, but change the role of the man in the video and he becomes the good guy.

Re:Good about the angle on this one (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817111)

Why don't you read the article first and then comment? It's not that hard, I promise.

...[the corrupted officials'] role in what was a honey trap organized by business executives seeking to blackmail powerful bureaucrats to win government contracts. The scheme ultimately failed, but the tapes ended up in the hands of the Chongqing police. After investigators failed to act, Mr. Zhu says, a disgruntled person inside the department sent the evidence his way.

Re:Good about the angle on this one (3, Informative)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817149)

The plot is thicker than the simplistic way you perceived it; the real "heroes" were the business executives attempting a blackmail on bureaucrats (that would be, in a Chinese setup, the hand of free market attempting to cut back on the burden of a leeching government).

The compromising images of Lei Zhengfu, the Chongqing official caught having sex with the 18-year-old, have been an anti-graft jackpot for Mr. Zhu: 11 officials have resigned or been fired for their role in what was a honey trap organized by business executives seeking to blackmail powerful bureaucrats to win government contracts. The scheme ultimately failed, but the tapes ended up in the hands of the Chongqing police. After investigators failed to act, Mr. Zhu says, a disgruntled person inside the department sent the evidence his way.

Re:Good about the angle on this one (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817645)

So, as long as there is an asshole victim, it is OK for a male to post sex tapes of an 18-year-old girl. That's what's so remarkable - remove this one factor and the frame instantly changes to 'creepy perv should be shot'.

Re:Good about the angle on this one (1)

c0lo (1497653) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817793)

So, as long as there is an asshole victim, it is OK for a male to post sex tapes of an 18-year-old girl. That's what's so remarkable - remove this one factor and the frame instantly changes to 'creepy perv should be shot'.

<large-grin> I surmise the 18-year-old girl's performance was work for hire. As such, the only parties that can claim damages would be the business executives which paid for the said performance and became the owners of the copyright on the art work posted on youtube by Zhu.</large-grin>

(18-year-old girl indeed... were did you get this one and the idea of rape? You really think those business executives arranged for 11 people - the one that resigned or were sacked - to rape a girl for the purpose of blackmailing them afterwards? Wouldn't it be simpler and safer to hire a hooker on a handful of coins for the purpose?
Maybe it's time for your periodic touch with the real-world outside? You know, you shouldn't let the computers uninterruptedly eat from your mind for long stretches of time)

fuck your way to freedom (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817015)

Then you will know the pr0n, and the pr0n will set you free.

The Chinese Julian Assange? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817139)

Well, we all know what kind of pinch Mr. Assange is in today. I imagine the Chinese will have far less compunction in getting rid of such a troublesome blogger if he goes after bigger fish.

don't believe the hype (4, Insightful)

decora (1710862) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817239)

there are a lot of bloggers who have exposed corruption etc who are in jail or who are under constant police harassment of themselves and their families, with employment blocked and all sorts of other problems that political dissidents have faced since time immemorial.

until people like Zhao Lianhai can live an ordinary free life in China, this talk of netizens fighting back the government is not convincing - it might simply be a bunch of propaganda and we all might be dupes in some kind of clever bureaucratic infighting inside the Communist Party hierarchy.

think about it. who leaked the video to him? who protected him from being arrested and sent to a labor camp for a year, like the girl who made a joke tweet a few years ago?

Re:don't believe the hype (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42818135)

Good thing here in the West we let anyone criticize China to their hearts content. Of course, criticize one of the many government's crimes and, if you're lucky, you have to live the rest of your life in an Ecuador embassy.

Re:don't believe the hype (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42820815)

Is this why Michael Moore lives in a mansion?
Oh were you conflating criticism with release of state secrets?
Let's compare like with like. Find a Chinese person who has done what Assange has done.

Pushing low-level wrongdoers under the bus ... (2)

Wrath0fb0b (302444) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817403)

... is a favorite pastime of the larger wrongdoers. Does anyone think that the PRC power structure really cares about some po-dunk municipal pervert?

of course. . . the obligatory: (1)

jafac (1449) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817443)

. . . pic or it didn't happen. . .

Just next phase (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817815)

of China's rise. They manage to trick the gullible and incompetent Western bankers into flooding money int China to promote their rise, the rise of communism, and zero human rights but China, at the right time, is throwing them over board and taking the money fromthe West for itself. Soon Europe and America will be baron wastelands and China will control it all.

Thanks banksters!

Foot-eating banksters: "You're welcome. Derrp!! hehe"

Sex videos? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817825)

sooo...what exactly is the issue here?
Are those Chinese not allowed to have sex?

Where is the porn? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42817871)

where is the video? link anyone?

Re:Where is the porn? (2)

Adult film producer (866485) | about a year and a half ago | (#42817883)

I am very interested in this as well.

Re:Where is the porn? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42818381)

Do you seriously expect a performance involving a 57-year-old government official to be enjoyable?

Re:Where is the porn? (1)

PPH (736903) | about a year and a half ago | (#42821027)

There's probably a few websites dedicated to this combo. No telling what turns some people's cranks.

Well I guess.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42818017)

We won't see him everrrr again ones the dust settles ...

In the name of freedom. (1)

kivig (2526134) | about a year and a half ago | (#42818225)

It's - people voice been heard and all that... But I wonder - if the tape is made up by the government to justify taking out somebody... It'd be ironical, how people lynch one in the name of freedom.

corruption? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42818577)

can someone explain me where the corruption part lies? the guy just had sex..

Hopefully.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42818835)

...the girl won't be exposed as being 17 - then the blogger will be dragged over to the US to face child pornography charges!

Fascinating, captain (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42818873)

They're fascinating, the wumao dang, absolutely fascinating.

Anybody know if their manual has been translated into English?

So he's a terrorist? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42819471)

You know, exposing the secrets of government and helping the enemies of the state at a time of war by making the government look bad.

Oh, sorry, this is CHINA, and that's fine. Sorry, I thought this was exposing corruption of the US government...

This years heros, last years losers! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42820463)

Bloggers in China will end up like just like the last years winners on "The Running man".

his life is in danger (1)

peter303 (12292) | about a year and a half ago | (#42820559)

If his real name becomes exposed. (which is the current law in China is to use your real name on the internet) Local police are pretty much above the law and federal police not much better. They will not think twice of a "fatal accident" if you cross someone's connection.

We just went to through a round of this last year with the Bo-Xilai incident. Bo was a potential Chinese presidential candidate. His wife was snuffing out business enemies using local police. The local police chief tried to defect to the US claiming he'd killed as an inmate. But Hillary brokered a compromise turning him over to federal police where he would at least have a chance at a trial and living.
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...