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Iris Scans Are the New School IDs

timothy posted about a year ago | from the sir-your-frog-is-boiling-even-as-we-speak dept.

Education 217

An anonymous reader writes "Winthrop University in South Carolina is testing out iris scanning technology during freshman orientation this summer. Students had their eyes scanned as they received their ID cards in June. 'Iris scanning has a very high level of accuracy, and you don't have to touch anything, said James Hammond, head of Winthrop University's Information Technology department. 'It can be hands free security.'" I wouldn't want to be locked out a building because of a scratched lens or a system outage, though.

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How would that be different... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44256603)

from being locked out due to a broken/lost/defective key/card/etc in any other building access system...?????

Re:How would that be different... (1)

similar_name (1164087) | about a year ago | (#44256781)

I wonder as we see more biometrics implemented when the ADA will get involved. It seems inevitable.

I don't have eyes you insensitive clod!

Re:How would that be different... (1)

sunking2 (521698) | about a year ago | (#44256937)

The ADA just means you have to accomodate work arounds, not make sure they can use the means. For example, you don't have to replace steps with ramps, just have ramps in addition, etc.

Re:How would that be different... (2)

similar_name (1164087) | about a year ago | (#44257039)

I meant it partly in jest but it should factor into the expense analysis if they did have to keep the old systems around. I wonder if shorter people might have trouble reaching the scanner. I'm not making any kind of argument here, my mind is just wandering on the topic. I wonder what other biometric systems might have issues with outliers in the population.

Re:How would that be different... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257105)

I wonder if shorter people might have trouble reaching the scanner.

...or people in wheelchairs.

Re:How would that be different... (3, Insightful)

MacGyver2210 (1053110) | about a year ago | (#44257589)

I think the first thing I would do, then, is to opt to use a 'disabled' alternative. My iris pattern is not something I am willing to provide to the school under any circumstances, along with my fingerprints, retinal map, and a number of other biometric options.

If they need something beyond an ID with RFID, QR code, or a magstripe, they need to provide some pretty fucking compelling reasons for me to go along with it.

Re:How would that be different... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257991)

my answer is i refuse to be scanned on the grounds of copyright infringement.
i own the unique design of my eyes that you use to identify me. your scanning me infringes my copyright.
that will be nine million dollars for your infringement.

Re:How would that be different... (0)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about a year ago | (#44257027)

Locked "out"? No Locked in! Or is it locked down?

Re:How would that be different... (1)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year ago | (#44258155)

The potential for kids messing with it is greater. One little smudge on the lens and the system is down. I predict 75% uptime tops.

lol wut? (1)

Iniamyen (2440798) | about a year ago | (#44256607)

I wouldn't want to be blocked out a building because of a scratched lens or a system outage, though.

Yeah, use badge readers instead. Those never have system outages.

Re:lol wut? (3, Interesting)

cervesaebraciator (2352888) | about a year ago | (#44256699)

Sure. Those have problems too. But why would you pay for a new (read: more expensive) version of a system that will have those same problems, plus new as yet undiscovered ones? Unless, of course, it has more to do with the business and office politics of the thing (the former being a salesperson willing to promise you a solution to a problem you didn't know you had; the latter being an administrator who will subsequently seek a promotion based on how effectively he increased campus security [theater]).

Re: lol wut? (4, Insightful)

alen (225700) | about a year ago | (#44256839)

You can share ID cards, but how do you share eyes between people?

Re: lol wut? (5, Funny)

publiclurker (952615) | about a year ago | (#44256931)

Well, borrowing is easy, it's returning the eyes that is difficult.

Re: lol wut? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257103)

High res photo.

Re: lol wut? (1)

wagnerrp (1305589) | about a year ago | (#44257581)

Painfully...

Re: lol wut? (1)

MacGyver2210 (1053110) | about a year ago | (#44257625)

You could always, you know, use a high-res macro photo of the person's eyes taped to some lens-less fake hipster glasses.

Or get crazy stealth and have contacts printed to look like the image of the iris.

Re: lol wut? (1)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year ago | (#44258169)

Polaroid.

Can no one else see a problem with this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44256627)

Privacy issues aside...

A bit of sand paper or a scribe the system is down until it's replaced. Rinse and repeat till the school is broke.
Since it's all about the money (school is paid per seat filled) it don't see it taking very long till this big brother system is gone.

Re:Can no one else see a problem with this? (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about a year ago | (#44256719)

The same thing can be said about other access control systems.
You never have to pay for a replacement card and the associated costs with that. Not many people lose their eye balls.
Once you find the culprit, who is probably caught on thousands of campus cameras, you sue them.

Re:Can no one else see a problem with this? (1)

hedwards (940851) | about a year ago | (#44257539)

No, but people do wear contact lenses, and I'm not sure that the systems deal well with that.

Re:Can no one else see a problem with this? (2)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year ago | (#44258175)

Contact lenses are pretty transparent.

Re:Can no one else see a problem with this? (1)

meerling (1487879) | about a year ago | (#44258309)

Since they are just looking at the iris, how do they respond to different colors?
Some people wear colored contacts, and some peoples eyes change colors for various reasons.

Re:Can no one else see a problem with this? (0)

cheater512 (783349) | about a year ago | (#44257499)

How is it a privacy issue? They don't get a eye blueprint and it isn't Minority Report style scanners.
It is the same as a student id, just possibly more convenient.

If a id card is big brother then you better move to a small pacific island asap!

Re:Can no one else see a problem with this? (1)

Shavano (2541114) | about a year ago | (#44258187)

No way is this going to be convenient. The camera is going to be small and have a very limited field of view and range over which it works. So you stand in line to have your eye scanned, 10 seconds per kid maybe. As opposed to RFID badges that you leave in your pocket or on your lanyard and it gets your code as you walk through the door.

Scratched Lens? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44256629)

Is a scratched lens a common occurrence?

Re:Scratched Lens? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44256739)

It is if you take sandpaper to the sensor on the device itself periodically.

Re:Scratched Lens? (1)

plover (150551) | about a year ago | (#44256829)

It's much less common than a mag stripe reader picking up a piece of dirt that scratches the hell out of everybody's cards. Then the reader has to be fixed and you get to replace every card in the system.

School full of stupid kids? (3, Insightful)

superdave80 (1226592) | about a year ago | (#44256635)

The reader will beep if they're on the right bus and honk if they're on the wrong one.

Or you could teach them to read the numbers on the side of the bus, but that's just my zany, wacky idea. Or are the kids too stupid to get on the exact same numbered bus day after day?

Re:School full of stupid kids? (3, Insightful)

cervesaebraciator (2352888) | about a year ago | (#44256649)

Besides, we still have human beings driving the buses, do we not? These same humans are charged with remembering the route to and location of each student's home. I should hope they'd also be able to recognize the student at sight.

Re:School full of stupid kids? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257927)

That part's harder than you think. I drove two busloads of kids a day with 50+ kids. I knew where the stops were, but it took me a few weeks to start getting familiar who was getting on and off where, still it would have been easy to sneak an extra person or less people- plus people are absent, have approval to bring home a friend, etc. We do our best, but there's no way I'm going to learn 100+ kids faces that I see for at most about 30 seconds a day as they get on and off to the point I'd know exactly who gets on and off at each stop and their names/faces.

Re:School full of stupid kids? (5, Funny)

khallow (566160) | about a year ago | (#44256737)

Or you could teach them to read the numbers on the side of the bus

if these were regular kids, you'd have a point. But these are college students. It's not fair to expect people like that to master such sophisticated mental tasks.

Re:School full of stupid kids? (2)

cervesaebraciator (2352888) | about a year ago | (#44256783)

RT... ah, nevermind. I find that abbreviation rude. Here's a public service:

By the fall, several schools -- ranging from elementary schools to colleges -- will be rolling out various iris scanning security methods.

My first reaction to the 'kids lose their school IDs line' was the same as yours here though.

Re:School full of stupid kids? (1)

khallow (566160) | about a year ago | (#44257289)

Sorry, I didn't catch that part of the article till later. In my defense, they only mentioned one school by name, Winthrop University in the entire story.

I see that Eyelock is testing its stuff [secureidnews.com] in at least one elementary school.

Re:School full of stupid kids? (1)

cheater512 (783349) | about a year ago | (#44257505)

Wait you want people to remember numbers just for a bus? Getting on a bus should require zero Maths knowledge.
That way they can better accommodate the majority of Americans.

Re:School full of stupid kids? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257569)

When i was in kindergarden, our jackets were hung under a picture, say a toothbrush, car, tree, cat, etc... perhaps buses could start using similiar pictograms

Re:School full of stupid kids? (1)

DarkTempes (822722) | about a year ago | (#44257795)

I actually remember having quite a bit of anxiety about this as a kid. The buses weren't always parked in the same order and sometimes it could be really hard to see the numbers and there's a huge rush to get everyone on the buses and for buses to start leaving and you don't want to get left behind. Also, buses broke down and so the number could get changed and you may not have heard it announced over the intercom system for various reasons.

I think maybe one time I got on the wrong bus because I was in a conversation with a friend and we walked to the same place the bus usually was and didn't notice that there was a different bus there and we got on the wrong one (but with a little running we were fine).
Of course, I didn't need something to beep at me to tell me that I was on the wrong bus. It was fairly obvious that the driver was different and that the wrong kids were in the seats.

I was also top of my class in a gifted program so I don't think it was an intelligence issue. There is a reason children are called children and not adults.

Another reason (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44256643)

Not to have kids.

Re:Another reason (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44256887)

The three immature jerks next to me at Burger King yesterday reminded many times over why my wife and I never had children.

Re:Another reason (3, Insightful)

rubycodez (864176) | about a year ago | (#44257635)

nice going, those jerks will have spawn but you won't, so you've contributed to the decline of the species.

What are we doing to our children? (5, Insightful)

Presto Vivace (882157) | about a year ago | (#44256651)

We are conditioning them to live in a police state.

Re:What are we doing to our children? (1, Insightful)

cervesaebraciator (2352888) | about a year ago | (#44256721)

This is why industrialists have promoted public education systems since their inception in this country (and, incidentally, why they promoted prohibition last century). It's not just philanthropy. Institutionalization leads to a more docile worker.

Re:What are we doing to our children? (4, Insightful)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about a year ago | (#44258109)

That is such bullshit. Public education leads to more workers full stop - that's why industrialists promoted public education.

The whole brainwashing/docile/pod-people crap is just conspiracy theory gone wild.

Re:What are we doing to our children? (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about a year ago | (#44256803)

"It's *safer* here."

Re:What are we doing to our children? (1)

readingaccount (2909349) | about a year ago | (#44257221)

"It's *safer* here."

Yeah, and then looked what happened? City 17 was completely destroyed by a dark-energy explosion.

Moral of the story - don't trust anyone except a mute with a lot of guns.

Re:What are we doing to our children? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44256827)

Future kids are slaves. Deal with it.
At least they're not sex slaves, yet. Be thankful, slave.

Re:What are we doing to our children? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257395)

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/rape-in-the-fields/

Re:What are we doing to our children? (2)

smprather (941570) | about a year ago | (#44256979)

We are conditioning them to live in a police state.

Yes, because "we" demand zero-defect terrorism policies. Don't blame the gubrmnt just because people flip out over bombs but accept causes of death orders of magnitude more significant. The terrorists have officially won.

Re:What are we doing to our children? (1)

Rockoon (1252108) | about a year ago | (#44257047)

Yes, because "we" demand zero-defect terrorism policies.

The people are demanding that. The politicians are claiming that the people are demanding that. The distinction isnt subtle.

Re:What are we doing to our children? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257257)

The people, by not opposing politicians implementing a police state, have given their implied consent to one.

How should I step up my opposing? (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#44257445)

I've been voting against the incumbent since I've been allowed to vote. How should I step up my opposing?

Re:How should I step up my opposing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257559)

Anyone who dares tell you the actual answer to your question will quickly be "disappeared". That's why no one talks about it.

Oh dear... someone's at the door...

Re:How should I step up my opposing? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257647)

Write letters to incumbents, volunteer in local campaigns, attend a party convention.

Re:What are we doing to our children? (1)

adolf (21054) | about a year ago | (#44257267)

The people are demanding that. The politicians are claiming that the people are demanding that.

(I assume this is a typo or an error of omission, and that you meant for there to be an aren't in there somewhere.)

You haven't heard the friendly, give-you-the-shirt-off-their-back folks I know who rail against "them Muslims." They live in the midwest and don't really do anything but work every day, live simple lives, and go to church on Sunday. They seldom leave the county for anything, let alone the state or country.

The anti-terrorist tactics don't affect them at all because they're completely unexposed to them. But terrorism (at least as a concept) is a threat to their simple and repetitive lifestyle (not that there is a single thing wrong with being simple and repetitive) so they're vehemently against that, at any expense, especially if it does not affect them.

These people (they are my friends and my neighbors) also vote. It's not that they don't care about freedom -- they're usually a very patriotic bunch -- but that they can't or won't see how their fellow countryman's freedom is also their responsibility.

*shrug*

(You wanna borrow a pickup truck or a trailer or a power tool or a ladder or need a place to stay for awhile? You want help swapping out a transmission or moving heavy things from A to B? These are your people, no questions asked. And they just don't see that the terrorists have won -- the win does not affect them.)

The distinction isnt subtle.

To be honest, I think it is a bit subtle. Fortunately for the distinction itself, English allows for it to be both subtle and profound.

Re:What are we doing to our children? (1)

smprather (941570) | about a year ago | (#44257409)

Yes, because "we" demand zero-defect terrorism policies.

The people are demanding that. The politicians are claiming that the people are demanding that. The distinction isnt subtle.

Citation? The same could be requested of me. Has anyone even asked this question. Google doesn't turn up much on the topic amazing.

This is yet another example of why it is important (1)

Presto Vivace (882157) | about a year ago | (#44256677)

to pay attention to school board and municipal elections.

Re:This is yet another example of why it is import (1)

garcia (6573) | about a year ago | (#44257783)

What sorts of public campaigns have you witnessed for school boards where these sorts of asinine discussions are raised? This would be injected into the meeting agenda as a minor item lumped with a bunch of others which would have all been approved with a single quick vote so they could move on to much more important topics such as wasting money on some frivolous sporting event or booster club meeting.

These sorts of discussions only come up during campaigns AFTER they've been put into place and one person in the community stands up to say WTF and is ignored at meeting after meeting by the administration who put it into place with the consent of the morons on the school board and then runs solely on the platform of removing this one item.

After they spend $1500 running, get on the board and abolish the decision, something else comes up which is possibly worse and they are powerless and clueless to stop it.

This is the problem with all local level government bodies (city, county, etc). People run on a single stupid platform, are elected, and stay there forever or are booted out because someone else has another single stupid platform of the day.

Most everyone else just shrugs, says ok, and their kids get scanned.

(As an aside, my kid is NEVER, EVER, EVER, EVER getting their fucking eyes or fingerprints or any other biometric data scanned for school -- fuck that noise).

Height issues (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44256729)

I feel bad for the kid who gets locked out because he's too short for the scanner to see him.

Re:Height issues (4, Interesting)

cervesaebraciator (2352888) | about a year ago | (#44256753)

This brings up an interesting point: think of the accessibility issues this raises. You can reach a card reader from a wheel chair. Will everyone have to bend down to wheel chair height to use the scanner or will those in wheel chairs be asked to stand?

Re:Height issues (1)

plover (150551) | about a year ago | (#44256795)

The Nozzle will adapt.
Please remain still while The Nozzle is scanning.
The Nozzle is continuing to scan.
Thank you.

Moving parts are another point of failure (1)

tepples (727027) | about a year ago | (#44257469)

And then the access control system fails when the mechanism that moves the nozzle to eye height fails.

Re:Height issues (1)

NearlyEverywhere (1126923) | about a year ago | (#44256825)

Or having to bend way down to get to the scanner and have accommodation compliance.

Not an easy process for some people (5, Interesting)

techno-vampire (666512) | about a year ago | (#44256747)

My eyes are very sensitive to bright light. Every year, when I get my eyes examined, I have to have them dilated so that the inside of the eye can be properly examined. This procedure is so painful that the ophthalmologist has to hold my eyelid open because no matter how hard I try I can't keep it open otherwise. I've offered to do i, but she always prefers to take care of it herself. And, from what she's said, this isn't exactly uncommon. I can just imagine what's going to happen the first time a student finds out that they can't keep their eye open long enough for the scan and can't get into class without it.

Re:Not an easy process for some people (3, Interesting)

MacGyver2210 (1053110) | about a year ago | (#44257685)

They can scan the Iris with Infrared light which is not detected by the eye, and therefore won't trigger the bright-light reaction. The part they are scanning is also the Iris - the colored ring surrounding the pupil - and not the Retina, at the back of your eye, requiring said pupil dilation.

Watch the pink eye spread (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44256751)

Just watch the pink eye spread like wildfire

Better, but still worthless (2)

Dereck1701 (1922824) | about a year ago | (#44256773)

I'd prefer it over fingerprint scanners as it is much less usable for mass surveillance. You don't leave it all over the place like DNA or finger prints and at least for the moment the technology doesn't exist for setting up mass scanners for public areas (think "Minority Report"). That said it has the same deficiency as all biometric systems, if your "password" gets stolen you can't change it. And don't think that "you can't fake iris scans", they have said that about every biometric security system invented and within 5 years after it becomes widely used someone is parading around a method of beating it, sometimes in hilariously easy ways.

Re:Better, but still worthless (1)

Titus Groan (2834723) | about a year ago | (#44256915)

"as it is much less usable for mass surveillance" you say that like it can't be done at a distance... it can, it's already in use at London Gatwick - how long before we see CCTV cameras on every street corner with this ability?

Re:Better, but still worthless (1)

Dereck1701 (1922824) | about a year ago | (#44258321)

Your average CCTV camera has a lower resolution than a 30 year old camcorder, and while there are attempts to bring the resolution up currently there is neither the bandwidth, storage, or processing power to capture/process all of that data cheaply enough to be widely distributed. I'm sure iris scanning can be done with current technology at a distance, but not cheaply, not reliably, and not quickly. The scanners at London Gatwick appear to be a modern, slow turnstile, people have to stand and stare for a time into a scanner. You cant currently set up a $1,000 device in a mall entrance/building lobby/sports event and capture everyone identities as they enter/exit (yet). That being said I'm sure there are companies right now working on it, hopefully they will go bankrupt trying and fail miserably.

Re:Better, but still worthless (1)

Seumas (6865) | about a year ago | (#44258261)

It's incredibly useless. What is so vital about access to school buildings that a badge isn't enough and you have to obtain and verify biometric data? It's a fucking university -- not NORAD.

Also, what's up with these idiots that just walk into their paid-for schooling and say "sure, scan me up, there boss!"?!

So when someone steals... (3, Insightful)

MasseKid (1294554) | about a year ago | (#44256801)

So when someone steals credentials, how do you change your "password"?

Re:So when someone steals... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44258003)

Informative? What is this, Minority Report?

Re:So when someone steals... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44258327)

You don't, the same way you don't change your "password" when you don't remember 'secret password'.

Again, biometrics are not good for authentication. (5, Insightful)

LeifOfLiberty (2812101) | about a year ago | (#44256873)

Biometrics are good for surveillance but not for authentication. A good authentication method supports revocation of an identification key, such as would be needed in the event of its compromise. It should not be trusted as a factor in authentication either, for the same reason. Great for theater though I suppose. Article about it here growingliberty.com/thumbs-down-for-fingerprint-identification

Re:Again, biometrics are not good for authenticati (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257985)

Another good article that makes the same point by Bruce Schneier himself. Biometrics: uses and abuses [schneier.com] .

If I have learned anything from hollywood (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44256885)

About 20 minutes in some whackjob will rip out my eye and feed it to the scanner. Much rather have my card stolen thank U very much...

What exactly is the security issue? (4, Insightful)

FuzzNugget (2840687) | about a year ago | (#44257011)

What exactly is the security issue that's significant enough to warrant such extreme and invasive measures? Is it such a prestigious institution that there are hoards of non-registered kids trying to sneak in? Is there a problem with rampant crime or extremely bad behaviour? What possible real reason could they have, other than, "hey, we got funding for this fancy new tech!" or conditioning them to the future of a police state?

Re:What exactly is the security issue? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257135)

What exactly is the security issue that's significant enough to warrant such extreme and invasive measures?

It magically prevents psycho killers from getting in through a broken window?

In actuality I'll bet these systems are hosted by shadowy third parties who plan to sell that personal information to whomever will pay for it.

Re: What exactly is the security issue? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257149)

And why do students need an ID at all these days? I never used an ID when I was in school/university back in the day.

Re: What exactly is the security issue? (1)

rusty0101 (565565) | about a year ago | (#44257255)

Students use student IDs to demonstrate that they are a student, either at the institution where the student ID is issued, or at related institutions and businesses, some of those businesses provide significant discounts to students. Whether a student 'needs' these things or not is a different matter. Most schools that I'm aware of hllow online registration that doesn't require an id, just a login. Books for classes are often available at a lower cost through third party sources. If you're living off campus you don't need an ID to gain access to yourr dorm. If you live within walking distance of classes, you don't need an id for campus busses (presumably, though with the size of some campuses these days, that may not be entirely satisfactory.)

And if your parents are footing the bill, you probably don't need a student ID to get a student loan, but those a another issue entirely.

Re:What exactly is the security issue? (1)

stenvar (2789879) | about a year ago | (#44257213)

Obviously, they need iris scanning to prevent some 35 year old perv from sneaking onto a school bus pretending to be a second grader!

Re:What exactly is the security issue? (2)

jschrod (172610) | about a year ago | (#44257497)

What exactly is the security issue that's significant enough to warrant such extreme and invasive measures?

That's easy to answer: They are not yet conditioned enough to accept all-around surveillance and ID requests under all circumstances. This is clearly a threat to the US "war on terrorism" and thus a security issue.

Re:What exactly is the security issue? (1)

Princeofcups (150855) | about a year ago | (#44257553)

What exactly is the security issue that's significant enough to warrant such extreme and invasive measures? Is it such a prestigious institution that there are hoards of non-registered kids trying to sneak in? Is there a problem with rampant crime or extremely bad behaviour? What possible real reason could they have, other than, "hey, we got funding for this fancy new tech!" or conditioning them to the future of a police state?

Lawyers. Lots of lawyers and parents ready to sue over the slightest thing.

Re:What exactly is the security issue? (1)

TheGratefulNet (143330) | about a year ago | (#44258267)

systematic training of citizens to 'follow orders and don't question them'.

just that simple, really.

behave or you are marked as a troublemaker. and it goes on your 'permanent record' (gee, that phrase has a new meaning, these days, doesn't it?)

Minority Report (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about a year ago | (#44257167)

43 comments and not a single reference to Minority Report [wikipedia.org] ? Is this Slashdot? Nor is it just a silly geek reference.

News from the future (1)

Kohath (38547) | about a year ago | (#44257189)

Wisconsin 7-year-old loses 2 toes to frostbite when the iris scanner wouldn't let her in the door. School officials say the inside surface of the lens was frosted over, preventing the scanner from functioning correctly.

horrible real-life preparation (2)

stenvar (2789879) | about a year ago | (#44257207)

We train our kids for more than a decade in a school system that is the opposite of the kind of society we want: it's a draconian, nearly totalitarian system that promotes belief in centralized authority and subjugation to expert opinion. And now, in addition to that, it trains kids to accept intrusive around the clock tracking and biometric identification. This does not bode well for the next generations of Americans.

Re:horrible real-life preparation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257579)

We train our kids for more than a decade in a school system that is the opposite of the kind of society we want

No, it's the opposite of the kind of society YOU want. The people in charge are getting exactly what they want. The schools are working just as designed.

Random university does random program (1)

fufufang (2603203) | about a year ago | (#44257295)

I have to say this is the first time I heard about this Winthrop University. Random small universities always seem to have more money than those more prestigious ones. Well at least they seem to have more money on this kind of random programs.

Re:Random university does random program (1)

Brucelet (1857158) | about a year ago | (#44258091)

This:

Random small universities always seem to have more money than those more prestigious ones.

is very different from this:

Well at least they seem to have more money on this kind of random programs.

questions remaining unanswered... (1, Interesting)

rusty0101 (565565) | about a year ago | (#44257343)

What are the procedures when the information that the iris scanner has recorded is no longer valid? The human iris is not a static unchanging feature of the body. Obviously it changes with the intensity of the light it experiences, but it also changes as a result of the fact that it's moving, and the components of the iris do break down over time. This is going to chang ethe pattern of lines in the iris. This may not be significant for a 4 year degree (does anyone really get a 4 year degree in 4 years anymore?) but if you ad in graduate and postgraduate work, as well as separate degree tracks if those become necessary for some reason, you can easily spend 12-16 years in college, which is a reasonable period of time over which your iris may change.

Additionally, if the iris scan for ID is required of instructors, administrative personel and custodial service staff, it's practically guaranteed that you will encounter these changes over time. Unless the scanners are designed to tollerate, and over time adjust for, such changes, the system is likely to run into issues over the tenure period of a professor, the career of staff, or that doctoral candidate who suddenly can't enter the building the day he needs to appear before his examiners to defend his thesis.

Re:questions remaining unanswered... (1)

jklovanc (1603149) | about a year ago | (#44258163)

All you do is re-scan the iris every few years. I bet that will be less often than the number of times the key card gets lost.

Macular Degeneration, The New Trend (1)

Khyber (864651) | about a year ago | (#44257377)

Bear in mind these new scanners are using UV or blue LEDs with a phosphor on them to produce a 'full spectrum' of light. These LED bases are well known to produce blue/Near-UV radiation that triggers or aggravates macular degeneration.

So enjoy your children going blind before they ever graduate. The levels will go up in tune with the increased implementation of these scanners.

Signed,
Your local LED product manufacturer

P.S. What're you going to do? Not a goddamned thing, you cowards. We already own you and your government.

Re:Macular Degeneration, The New Trend (1)

MacGyver2210 (1053110) | about a year ago | (#44257737)

I would think they would use IR instead, as it doesn't trigger a pupil change in the scannee, and most iris-recognition systems I have seen use this spectrum.

Also, the 'macular degeneration' studies are retinal cells, out of the eye, placed in plastic boxes and bombarded by full-powered LED light at a close range. Not exactly the most conclusive thing to compare to retinal cells behind several Humours and a Crystallin/UV-filtered lens.

The disturbing trend (1)

ikhider (2837593) | about a year ago | (#44257595)

I visited one of my post-secondary schools and noticed two things: considerably less books in the libraries and wayyyy more security guards roaming the hallways giving hard stares and ready to start trouble. DRM computers in the classrooms and DRM programs as part of the mandatory curriculum. The professors and program coordinators seem to have no clue as to what is going on and why it is bad for both the students and the future. In the time I left school things clearly took a turn for the worse in education.

Defective scanner - reduced vision in old age? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257797)

How will they absolutely guarantee that the optical scanner won't apply too much photonic energy to my retina? How will they ensure that as the scanner fails over time, that it won't lead to these kind of defects? Considering that schools cut budgets often, how is this not a real concern? Better to attend another university instead rather than to risk reduced vision in old age!

everything for sale (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#44257811)

I haven't seen anyone yet comment about stolen or sold iris scans. It's not like you can get a new iris. If the companies/institutions get sloppy or unethical what then?

celle

cap- quagmire

they better not use this to force Large Lectures (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about a year ago | (#44258057)

Some Large Lecture Classes are next to useless to be at each Lecture and the last thing needed is forcing people to go all of them.

I have a better idea (1)

epyT-R (613989) | about a year ago | (#44258255)

1. remove all surveillance and tardy punishments. They aren't needed.
2. the kid doesn't have to be in class everyday as long as he passes his tests and hands in his projects on time. if his grades suck, he fails the course and has to retake it.
3. repeat offenders are dealt with according to their situations.

This saves buttloads of money because the kids who want to learn or at least graduate will do so, the teachers wont' have to waste time with those who don't want to be there, and when those people do finally drop out, they will flip burgers instead of filling university seats because they can play football. Maybe the NFL can set up recruitment camps for them.

Re:I have a better idea (1)

0123456 (636235) | about a year ago | (#44258291)

There's one problem with your argument:

1. Schools exist to fund phat jobs for those who couldn't find work in the real world.

The last thing they want is to be more efficient and effective, then jobs get cut and they can't demand more money for doing a bad job.

Stealing eyeballs (1)

hessian (467078) | about a year ago | (#44258281)

You know what's valuable now?

The best kind of fake ID -- someone's eyeball, removed.

"It's him, we've got the iris scan... it does look a little dead... oh well, ring him in just in case."

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