Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

You're Only As Hirable As Your Google+ Circles

timothy posted about 10 months ago | from the it's-coming-from-inside-the-house dept.

Google 195

theodp writes "A pending Google patent for Identifying Prospective Employee Candidates via Employee Connections lays out plans for data mining employees' social graphs to find top job candidates. According to the patent application, the system would consider factors including the performance of the employees at the company whose circles you are in — under the assumption that the friends of top performers are more likely to be top performers themselves. It's the invention of three Googlers, including an HR VP who was quoted recently in an article that questioned the wisdom of certain Google hiring practices said to encourage 'echo chamber' hiring."

cancel ×

195 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

The IT IN Crowd (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316881)

Ah, so you won't get a job unless you're in the IT IN crowd.

All of my friends outside of work are mostly non-IT people. Then again, I don't consider myself a top performer - I've known some incredibly talented people and I am definitely NOT one of them. Some of THEIR friends, on the other hand, were strippers, drug users and drunks.

So guys, there's a good chance that Google+ will get that hot chick in your department - she won't code worth a damn, though.

Re:The IT IN Crowd (3, Insightful)

jonfr (888673) | about 10 months ago | (#45317709)

Top performers burn out fast and do not return to the IT field.

Remind me (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316883)

What's Google+?

Re:Remind me (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316895)

You must be unemployed.

Re:Remind me (1)

flyneye (84093) | about 10 months ago | (#45316935)

On the other hand, employment means; expending your time, energy, motivation and perhaps physical well-being for the enrichment of someone else who has NO appreciation for the lifes treasure you sacrifice except a small, nearly worthless monetary token and the forced gift of reduced cost medical care, so you might work longer and more efficiently for his edification.
        Nah, fuck it, if being employed means I have to butt lick my way up a social-ad-dispensaries site, I'll take my chances on my own.
You can just call for Fly N. Eye, male prostitute, consultant of everything, brewer, luthier, archaeologist, physicist and holy man.

Re:Remind me (5, Funny)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 10 months ago | (#45316995)

You can just call for Fly N. Eye, male prostitute, consultant of everything, brewer, luthier, archaeologist, physicist and holy man.

Can you set me up with a shrubbery? Maybe something with a two level effect and a little path running down the middle.

Re:Remind me (1)

flyneye (84093) | about 10 months ago | (#45317047)

Not a problem, aisle 5 across from the holy grenades of Antioch.

Re:Remind me (1)

slick7 (1703596) | about 10 months ago | (#45317133)

Not a problem, aisle 5 across from the holy grenades of Antioch.

Next to the blue light special.

Re:Remind me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317065)

Ni! Ni!

Re:Remind me (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317139)

No, I'm working and getting results. I'm also wondering why on earth I should use Google+.
I've got an account, but didn't find any use for it beyond Google Wave, and Google Wave I dismissed a loong time before the market did.

If a company requires me to waste time fooling around on a proprietary and unstable platform giving out my personal, social and work information for free, then it's a good signal for me to avoid said company.

Captcha: spectrum

To answer a rhetorical question.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316923)

It's something they keep hammering you on when you get a gmail, YouTube, or shop at a "Google Approved" store or whatever it's called. They send you little notices of people you might know - and it looks like LinkedIn notices. I almost went for it one morning before I had enough coffee.

Google is trying to be Facebook + LinkedIn + some other evil purpose all rolled into one.

I'm surprised Google hasn't bought Dice.com with a small part of their toilet paper budget - or just Slashdot.

Re:To answer a rhetorical question.... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316953)

I'm surprised Google hasn't bought Dice.com with a small part of their toilet paper budget - or just Slashdot.

Even the owners of Google+ know that Slashdot has no value.

Re:Remind me (0)

PRMan (959735) | about 10 months ago | (#45317023)

Seriously mods? This is hilarious.

Going back to FB (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317301)

I know exactly what Google + is. I was hoping to switch over to it as I closed my FB a few years ago. Not that Goggles give a crap as I'm "not in their circle" apparently, but I'm now not ever going back to gmail (switched over to yahoo mail a while back. Don't regret it), or trying Google + Very disappointed in u over this Google. Whatever. Nowhere to go but back into the dragons arms of FB. Wish there was more alternatives, but the so-called "alternatives" just aren't at the races. Stuck with eyephone, from Mom, and FB...

Re:Remind me (2, Insightful)

mrmeval (662166) | about 10 months ago | (#45317425)

I won't hire someone who admits to being on G- or has a resume or card with G- on it. It shows an inebriated lack of the skills I need.

Management (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316885)

Give them a yardstick and they think they can measure anything. Lines of code, number of published papers, gene sequence. The clearest result of risk management is that you stop taking risks: You're getting old, Google.

Re:Management (3, Insightful)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#45317257)

The clearest result of risk management is that you stop taking risks

Mark Twain has been reincarnated in the 21st century. Seriously, that's the best damn description of risk management I've ever heard.

P.S. Not being a credit stealer, I'll remember to attribute it Anonymous Coward. Is that a pseudonym?

Re:Management (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317311)

The clearest result of risk management is that you stop taking risks knowingly

Here fixed that for you.
You still take insane amounts of risks, just the ones you didn't identify,which is the worst of course.

Re:Management (1)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | about 10 months ago | (#45317399)

Funny, that is how most middle managers I know work with risk, but the correct term is risk avoidance. Risk management is to knowlingly take risks and work to understand them, so that you can reduce the likelihood of them occurring, or mitigate the results.

Re:Management (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#45317445)

Give them a yardstick and they think they can measure anything.

They are a bit overconfident about that, aren't they?

Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.

Said by a fellow named A. Einstein, who was reputed to have some understanding of quantitative thinking, but who probably wouldn't be hireable in the 21st century.

Re:Management (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317503)

Said by a fellow named A. Einstein, who was reputed to have some understanding of quantitative thinking, but who probably wouldn't be hireable in the 21st century.

Since Albert Eva Einstein had neither a college diploma or university degree your assertion that he would be unemployed today is correct. A couple of fact statements, a rule statement in the form of implication, and propositional logic calculus using modus ponens [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modus_ponens](MP)[/url] proves the assertion (claim) to be valid.

Eh (1)

TempleOS (3394245) | about 10 months ago | (#45316887)

The Linux followers like to do stories on how git is the main thing employers look for. I will never have an employer. Does God know you?

WTF? (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316891)

Sounds like technological quasi-nepotism to me.

Re:WTF? (5, Insightful)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 10 months ago | (#45317031)

Sounds like technological quasi-nepotism to me.

You have to go to the right schools, work for the right company and know the right people. Otherwise GoogleJudge will condemn you as raw material for soylent green tacos. Google: making a dystopian future reality today.

Re:WTF? (2)

slick7 (1703596) | about 10 months ago | (#45317149)

Sounds like technological quasi-nepotism to me.

You have to go to the right schools, work for the right company and know the right people. Otherwise GoogleJudge will condemn you as raw material for soylent green tacos. Google: making a dystopian future reality today.

Same goes for the MAFIA, but they have higher standards.

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317197)

Thanks for reminding me why I'm not getting the Nexus 5, even though it's the phone I want. Google suck. Never got anything from them despite the fact their one of the only companies I chucked coin at for software. They'll be the next MS maybe.

Don't care really. Don't want to know about them.

Re:WTF? (0)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about 10 months ago | (#45317447)

You have to go to the right schools, ...

I've worked with many software developers in the Northeast. Fun fact: skill correlated strongly with alma mater. All of the MIT-educated developers were better than all of the non-MIT-educated developers. After that, most of the ones from (Ivy League schools + Carnegie Melon) were better than most of the remaining developers.

Regardless of one's thoughts about the mechanism and/or fairness of things working that way, the aforementioned correlations definitely exist in my experience. And since most companies' missions is to get the job done well, rather than promote social equality, it seems reasonable to me that they use circle information if that helps. (And assuming it doesn't violate the privacy of any of Google+'s 50 users.)

Re:WTF? (3, Interesting)

russotto (537200) | about 10 months ago | (#45317609)

I've worked with many software developers in the Northeast. Fun fact: skill correlated strongly with alma mater. All of the MIT-educated developers were better than all of the non-MIT-educated developers. After that, most of the ones from (Ivy League schools + Carnegie Melon) were better than most of the remaining developers.

Yeah, someone [wikipedia.org] with a B.S. from the University of Minnesota and later a Ph.D. from the University of Washington couldn't possibly be a better developer than an MIT grad.

Re:WTF? (2)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about 10 months ago | (#45317737)

You're not differentiating between a trend being strong enough that it justifies using it as a heuristic, vs. the trend having no exceptions whatsoever.

Re:WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317767)

Yeah, don't mention where Seymour Cray went to school, either, you'll blow his tiny little worldview up.

Just maintain two profiles (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317583)

One with all your professional contacts and your real name, and one with your personal contacts and a fake name.

The just lie and say you only have one profile, your professional one is it, and those are your friends.

Seems easy enough.

Re:Just maintain two profiles (1)

minstrelmike (1602771) | about 10 months ago | (#45317779)

The fakiness of the entire situation is why they are in sync. Most of the current companies aren't actually companies. They aren't profitable and are just holding on in the hopes of being bought out by someone else with too much money and nothing to do with it because private people cannot invest in roads, bridges, and other governmental infrastructure.

Re:WTF? (1)

minstrelmike (1602771) | about 10 months ago | (#45317765)

Excellent insight except for thinking it is a Google problem.
"echo-chamber hiring" is a new term. The classic term in sociology, probably politically incorrect now, was called 'homosexual reproduction.'
The Bush administration's use of Condeleeza Rice was an example of that. On the outside, she was a Black woman, but on the inside, she thought exactly the same as all the other Republicans and thus you don't get to take advantage of having different thought patterns and insights in your group.

I think the downward spiral of American auto manufacturing was caused by this. You had a bunch of old rich white men WHO DON'T EVEN DRIVE THEIR OWN VEHICLES ANY MORE building cars. It's a good way to lose touch with the market place.

Oh good (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316901)

The work place becomes EVEN MORE of a popularity contest. Linked-in is already there with this bullshit. Google wants to make it worse 3.

Re:Oh good (4, Insightful)

Luckyo (1726890) | about 10 months ago | (#45317427)

It just wants a piece of linkedin's pie.

But I'm awesome at what I do... (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316903)

...and I don't have connections with top performers, because I've never had a chance to work with them!

All this overhyping and overvaluing is an important stage in the development of any technology, but I can't wait for social media to be just another thing that we do, and not something that has to be commoditised at every opportunity. I hope that in 10 years, data-mining social media is going to be looked down on the way spam and chain-emails are now. I'm not so unrealistic to imagine it will go away, but I hope it will become socially unacceptable behaviour.

Re:But I'm awesome at what I do... (4, Insightful)

Seumas (6865) | about 10 months ago | (#45316965)

I don't really use social networks at all and I definitely don't have my family or any (current or former) colleagues in my circles or "friends" lists. I don't understand people who do that. I don't need or want to know every second of every day of their entire lives, whether they're the guy I used to work with at the office or my own mom (I don't even know who in my family has social network accounts and I don't care). They don't want or need to know any of that about me, either.

The only place this would be remotely relevant would be at LinkedIN . . . where all of this pretty much already occurs, anyway.

Re:But I'm awesome at what I do... (5, Interesting)

PRMan (959735) | about 10 months ago | (#45317049)

All the best programmers I know AREN'T ON SOCIAL MEDIA AT ALL. So I don't see this working very well, unless it's for sales droids.

Re:But I'm awesome at what I do... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317119)

This. I don't consider myself a "top performing programmer", but I have worked with some of those, and to a person, they don't have any interest in social networking. They consider it a pointless, mundane waste of time.

There appears to be a strong inverse correlation between use of social networking, and intelligence.

Re:But I'm awesome at what I do... (1)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | about 10 months ago | (#45317457)

All the best programmers I know AREN'T ON SOCIAL MEDIA AT ALL. So I don't see this working very well, unless it's for sales droids.

Shhhhh.... you are running the slashvertisment.

Re:But I'm awesome at what I do... (1, Interesting)

DoofusOfDeath (636671) | about 10 months ago | (#45317461)

Agreed. I'm not a top programmer, but I'm pretty good.

I avoid Facebook and Google+ for a few reasons:
- It's a shallow way to interact.
- It's distracting.
- I find Facebook privacy policies unacceptable, given the info that could access.
- Being friended by one too many ex-girlfriends.

Or to put it another way, my life probably nearly half over already. There's too much other stuff I want to get done in my remaining years.

Re:But I'm awesome at what I do... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317823)

- not a top programmer
- ex-girlfriends
=QED

Re:But I'm awesome at what I do... (1)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | about 10 months ago | (#45317467)

So the job market consists of programmers and sales droids?

By the way, perhaps this will work especially for programmers. The best programmers might not be into networking or social media at all... but in my experience, the genius basement dwellers are not the programmers who are most valuable to your company. Good coders with a wide network of peers and people outside their own profession, as well as strong coaching (!= teaching) skills, are the true stars: hard to find, but incredibly valuable.

Of course a strong presence on FB or G+ isn't really a good indicator for this type of person.

Re:But I'm awesome at what I do... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317491)

Or they just see mailing lists as a more interesting form of social media.

I recently got contacted by a google recruiter and that is how he got my email address -- I don't have any social media accounts. (I got the job.)

Re:But I'm awesome at what I do... (1)

fred911 (83970) | about 10 months ago | (#45317913)

Most sales droids don't publicize their real lives, especially the top performers.

Re:But I'm awesome at what I do... (1)

game kid (805301) | about 10 months ago | (#45317187)

They're not hiring. They're poaching.

Nepotism (4, Insightful)

Stickerboy (61554) | about 10 months ago | (#45316907)

Infinite computing power to apply analytics to hiring practices, and they end up with nepotism. Truly garbage in, garbage out. I bet the friends of the HR VP are all top candidates...

Re:Nepotism (2)

LordNimon (85072) | about 10 months ago | (#45317025)

No kidding. The worst performers in our company are those that are friends of the executives.

Re: Nepotism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317069)

Isn't that a culture? People with a similar vision that get along are likely to be friends. A good culture will have people with a similar vision that get along. You're saying that's bad?

We've used Facebook etc to exclude candidates: gun nuts, drug users, political extremists, etc. Why not look at a candidate's peers for trends / patterns?

Next, you'll complain about referees. If those referees are undesirable, it will reflect badly on a candidate.

For the record, I really dislike these social connectivity tools. I use them against candidates, not for them.

Diversity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317185)

Isn't that a culture? People with a similar vision that get along are likely to be friends. A good culture will have people with a similar vision that get along. You're saying that's bad?

Yes, a company culture without diversity is a very bad thing. It leads you to stick on the same narrower and narrower paths (hello Microsoft) instead of being open to the needs of your future customers. In science it can slow progress to a generational level where you have to wait for the old guard to pass before new ideas can get a fair hearing.

"Diversity" isn't about the color of your skin or whether you sit/stand to pee, it's different viewpoints and different values that will help question assumptions you take for granted and maybe help identify which ones have outlived their usefulness.

Re:Diversity (3, Insightful)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#45317525)

"Diversity" [is] different viewpoints and different values that will help question assumptions you take for granted

Ironically that's one of the reasons for age discrimination - the fear that old farts know too much history and have been around the block too many times to buy into the latest groupthink. Don't misunderstand me; it goes both ways. Sometimes the old farts need to be shaken up by younger people with crazy new ideas. The worst thing you can do in this industry is to have a closed mind and not want to try new things. OTOH, the old farts can tell a whippersnapper when his "new" idea has actually been tried 27 times, never worked, and most importantly, why it never worked. That's not always a death knell for a "new" idea, because sometimes the tech has changed such that it will be practical. Usually that's not the case though. At the very least, it challenges the whippersnapper to explain why it will work this time.

Re:Diversity (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317833)

As someone who is becoming one of those "old farts", I have to say that very few people ever remember why something didn't work and even fewer of those are capable of communicating what they know. Possibly because very few ever bothered to try to understand why certain things work and others do not. I think that's why tomes like "The Mythical Man Month" are still relevant today.

Team members at both ends of the age spectrum are, on average, harder to lead because the one accepts too easily and the other rejects too easily. For those reasons you'd logically want to discriminate against both the young and old. No, the primary reason age discrimination focuses on the old is the same reason we discriminate against high-priced apps: when the cost is nominal we'll take a chance on a potentially outsize return but when the cost is high we're afraid we might not even recoup our investment let alone make a proportional profit.

It sucks :-(

Re: Nepotism (1)

Sporkinum (655143) | about 10 months ago | (#45317449)

And if they don't use those social connectivity tools, what do you do?

Re: Nepotism (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317849)

And if they don't use those social connectivity tools, what do you do?

Don't hire those poindexters, brah!

Re:Nepotism (1)

slick7 (1703596) | about 10 months ago | (#45317199)

No kidding. The worst performers in our company are those that are friends of the executives.

This is stage two, the first stage got all manufacturing overseas, this stage will cement the incompetence into a hardened ball of shit.
When the smart guys in business realize the best place for business is in America and start to bring back quality manufacturing, there will be no quality leadership. Just look at the politicians, whores to the highest bidder's interests and screw the American people that elected them.

Re:Nepotism (1)

rasmusbr (2186518) | about 10 months ago | (#45317191)

It's not completely unreasonable if it's done on a per-time basis...

Suppose that A is known to be a highly skilled and productive employee and A spends a lot of time talking, texting etc with B, who works for the same company. It seems to me that there are a few likely possibilities:

1) A is B's boss
2) B is A's boss
3) A and B are friends
4) A and B are having sex
5) A is working with B because A thinks B is a skilled or productive person

It should be fairly easy to rule out (1) and (2) using publicly available data. (3) and (4) are harder to rule out, but it might be possible to make a guess based on what time of day the interaction takes place. That then leaves (5) as the most likely explanation for the interaction.

Another way to do this would be to ask A what he thinks of B, but let's not get crazy!

ah hiring people like me (1)

mjwalshe (1680392) | about 10 months ago | (#45316913)

I would have hoped that a HR vp (FFS) would have realized the horrible issues that this system will cause

Re:ah hiring people like me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316943)

Not even close dude You'll find people in power will stock a Sinking ship with their best buddys on the bridge.

So it's not what you know... (1)

Maritz (1829006) | about 10 months ago | (#45316921)

It's who you know?

Re:So it's not what you know... (1)

eneville (745111) | about 10 months ago | (#45316931)

No, it's who allows you to add them to your circles. If I change my name/picture to appear to be a higher up, and then circle lots of skillful people, late changing my photo/name back may allow for some statistic skewing.

Re:So it's not what you know... (5, Interesting)

Seumas (6865) | about 10 months ago | (#45316949)

Not really. Google Plus isn't like Facebook. Anyone can put you in your circle, even if you don't have a clue who they are and don't have them in one of your circles. Also, just because I have someone in a circle or I'm in theirs doesn't mean I am an associate or that I know them or have worked with them or in any way identify with them whatsoever.

Anyway, this only seems relevant to web designers, photographers, and "internet personalities" which is already a pretty incestuous mutual-masturbation club as it is. Everyone else seems to approach G+ with a strong "eh... I don't get it" attitude.

Re:So it's not what you know... (1)

mjwalshe (1680392) | about 10 months ago | (#45317037)

And how do you work out if some ones a high performer from G+ or Linkedin - thinks better drop all those recruitment types from my linked in profile and only keep the good ones like the ex CTO's

Re:So it's not what you know... (2)

transporter_ii (986545) | about 10 months ago | (#45316963)

No. It's who you know...on the ***Internet***. So now you need Facebook to get credit, and Google+ to get hired. Don't use these services because of privacy issues. That's fine, you just won't get credit or a job.

It's like when I used to have to run credit checks on people, and they didn't want to give me their social security number. That's fine, I don't care. You just will not get this product you are wanting without forking it over. Now keep in mind that I totally agreed with the people, but like a good Nazi, I was just doing my job.

Re:So it's not what you know... (1)

mjwalshe (1680392) | about 10 months ago | (#45317045)

So is have the scoblizer in your circles a good idea or not :-)

Re:So it's not what you know... (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#45316969)

well, that's the word on the street.
if you're a marketer for google+ anyways.

Color me unemployed then. (5, Informative)

bigtallmofo (695287) | about 10 months ago | (#45316927)

I deleted my Google+ profile a couple months ago when I posted (what I thought was) a private video to YouTube. It was a demonstration of a new feature I created in a website for a side-job of mine. Suddenly all my Google+ knucklehead friends started posting, "I don't get it - why is this funny?" and other stupid things.

I don't want one company getting all of my data sharing it in ways they want to.

Re:Color me unemployed then. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317003)

I too deleted my Google+ account, but not for as good a reason. I simply never, ever, ever used it. Ever. Seemed pointless to have 'just another' stale account out there. What's interesting is I had amassed a decent number of folks in my circles. In looking at my feed (or whatever it's called) everyone I know except for a couple of people quit using it as well. That horse died before it made a full lap.

is Google turning evil? (5, Insightful)

bzipitidoo (647217) | about 10 months ago | (#45317057)

A week ago, I was logged into Gmail and looking at Youtube when this window popped up asking which name I wanted to use. I didn't look that closely at it, as I was busy. Just quickly clicked on what I thought would maintain the status quo. Now my Youtube handle has replaced my name in Gmail. I didn't want my Youtube and Gmail accounts linked. It seems the actions that one time popup started can't be undone. Attempting to delete the Google+ profile that was automatically created somehow isn't working.

How did you delete Google+ without losing Gmail? Or did you delete everything?

Google made a mess, and I'm not happy about it. Keep hearing all these stories about Google doing questionable things, even slightly evil things, but until this happened to me, I didn't pay much attention. And now they're rolling out this tool that could unfairly affect employment prospects. What are they thinking these days?

Re:is Google turning evil? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317157)

I don't care to look up how at the moment, but I believe that you have two weeks to change it back if you want....

Re:is Google turning evil? (2)

odie5533 (989896) | about 10 months ago | (#45317217)

Google wants you to use your real name everywhere. And you have little to no say in the matter.

Re:is Google turning evil? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317385)

The only way is to kill yourself

Re:is Google turning evil? (1)

mosb1000 (710161) | about 10 months ago | (#45317391)

What you do is you delete both and switch to an email provider who is less insane and has a better idea what you want.

Re: Color me unemployed then. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317273)

Same here. But I can't completely delete it, because I will forfeit all my google play purchases.

Google plus isn't doing anything for me. They keep doing unpleasant things to me. They have merged accounts without my knowledge or consent. They constantly harrass me to by telling who I should and shouldn't be friends with. They keep nudging me to add people to my circles or to maintain contact in inappropriate ways.

Hey remember that guy who succumbed to addiction and tried to knife you for 20$ who are you are avoiding? We are going to keep sending updates to him every week and suggest you add him to your profile because you e-mailed each other once 7 years ago. How about your ex-gf from 10 years ago? A guy you went to school with 17 years ago who is now a violent offender? Why aren't you guys talking on our service?

No? Okay, we'll keep asking until we eventually find a way to do it anyways. To hell the consequnces to your real life.

Hey why haven't filled out all these nosy questions? Nevermind. We'll find out anyways by looking through everryone else's data.

patented..? (3, Insightful)

gbjbaanb (229885) | about 10 months ago | (#45316939)

thank you Google, once you have that patent other companies won't be able to use this stupid concept for hiring without breaking the law - and I guess every failed candidate will be first up to call in the lawyers if if becomes apparent this bullshit was used against them.

Well, I can dream that a the patent system has some valid use, can't I?

Only a 23 year old would think this is a good idea (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316945)

....especially if they are from a hip, young person oriented city and live their lives through social media where they express all their zany stories through photo sharing and short status blurbs. It just so happens that Google is based in (or very near) such a place.

Real nerds don't have friends! (2)

eatvegetables (914186) | about 10 months ago | (#45316961)

A fundamental flaw in Google's logic!

Re:Real nerds don't have friends! (2)

c0lo (1497653) | about 10 months ago | (#45317059)

A fundamental flaw in Google's logic!

Real nerds make very good friends with other nerds, especially if they share the interest.
The "species" that doesn't trully have friends is the dolts.

Re:Real nerds don't have friends! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317285)

Seeing as how they are hiring users of Google+, I'd say they are spot on.

Prior art (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45316973)

It called the 'Yes men' syndrome.

Let's just patent breathing and be done (3, Interesting)

Bucc5062 (856482) | about 10 months ago | (#45316987)

How is this even a patent? Okay, besides the obvious "well they filed it". IT is describing the general practice of investigation for hiring that HR departments do across the country. So now what, when some checks out a person in google+ they have to pay for the license to do so?

The system was broken...now it is defiled.

bullcrap (1)

Mr_Nitro (1174707) | about 10 months ago | (#45317017)

worst way possible, I would hire based on montecarlo sampling in a strongly willed pool of applicants, I am sure it will lead to better results and everyone will have their chance after a uniform time t.

Re:bullcrap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317067)

worst way possible, I would hire based on montecarlo sampling in a strongly willied pool of applicants, I am sure it will lead to better results and everyone will have their chance after a uniform time t.

FTFY - now your statement starts making some sence.

Re:bullcrap (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317081)

FTFY - now your statement starts making some sence

Yet your statement makes no sense at all!

Google Mindset (5, Insightful)

Goody (23843) | about 10 months ago | (#45317029)

Google considers Google Apps a viable replacement for Microsoft Office, so I can see where they would think Googe+ circles are a replacement for real interviewing and hiring skills.

Re:Google Mindset (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 10 months ago | (#45317061)

well they already figured out at google that their multi-layer interview/games/"scientific hiring" wasn't working out like they wanted(there's few stories about it.. very few people actually have time and money to sit around waiting for it to finish once you're in the flow)...

so something else, anything, is a way to go. if it happens to be a marketing tool for their benchmark product then all the better to put some publication out about it.

dunno what's their plan to justify this in places where equal oppurtunity etc laws are in place though.

Re:Google Mindset (2)

Goody (23843) | about 10 months ago | (#45317259)

Good point about equal opportunity laws. I can see lawsuits coming a mile away from this hiring method. In the US, or at least the state I'm in, you can't ask things like marital status, what kind of music they like, etc. Not that those kinds of things are relevant to the hiring process, but you just can't even ask them on the side, otherwise you open yourself up to lawsuits. I can see where someone could easily threaten a lawsuit if they weren't hired, claiming they had G+ friends who are minorities, homosexuals, motorcycle gang members, or whatever you can think of, and this information was used to eliminate them from being hired. I'm not saying they'll be successful with such lawsuits, but no company wants to deal with the time and cost that comes with these.

Re:Google Mindset (1)

minstrelmike (1602771) | about 10 months ago | (#45317825)

Google considers Google Apps a viable replacement for Microsoft Office, so I can see where they would think Googe+ circles are a replacement for real interviewing and hiring skills.

That is really funny.
However, examine assumptions and you end up with a sclerotic defense of Google.
Good interviewing and hiring skills _are_ extremely rare. There are thousands of articles about trying to fix the process.

Sorry ... (1)

kjell79 (215108) | about 10 months ago | (#45317121)

I don't want to work for a company that filters their candidates that way. I wouldn't want to work with someone whose only skill is hanging out with the right people. That is, I don't want to work with a John Spano.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Spano

They aut(istic) not to do this. (1)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about 10 months ago | (#45317221)

Aren't they gonna miss a hell of a lot of loners this way?

If you wanna have a second-rate tech force, go ahead, Google. Make sure all your elites have lead water pipes like ancient Rome did.

Re:They aut(istic) not to do this. (1)

minstrelmike (1602771) | about 10 months ago | (#45317853)

Aren't they gonna miss a hell of a lot of loners this way?

If you wanna have a second-rate tech force, go ahead, Google. Make sure all your elites have lead water pipes like ancient Rome did.

Google has an edge over the competition because they hire people two different ways.
One is with interviews, job fairs, big data searches (which are a good option. Joel Spolsky has noted that the very best workers are rarely looking for a job).

The other way to 'hire' people is just to buy their damn company. This is how Google gets many of the hotshot loner types.
Other companies cannot do that.

A truely sad day (1)

LostMonk (1839248) | about 10 months ago | (#45317249)

It's a sad day indeed when you're judged by you're social skills when applying to a tech job.
I know, companies love their own creation and think it's the most awesome tool and anyone who is worth anything at all must be using it already or he/she were worthless in the first place. Anyone who doesn't think like they do simply hasn't seen the light yet or is beneath their notice.
When I want to get in touch with friends I pick up the phone and/or go out with them for a beer.

Fuck all this networking shit.

Re:A truely sad day (1)

minstrelmike (1602771) | about 10 months ago | (#45317869)

It's a sad day indeed when you're judged by you're social skills when applying to a tech job.

Unlike a job interview? (sarcasm). Seems to me most of the questions asked face-to-face are about social skills.
I'm not saying that's good or bad; I'm simply observing that it _is_ that way already.
Searching your fBook and g+ profiles is just another way of putting lipstick on that process.

Another vicious circle (1)

ebno-10db (1459097) | about 10 months ago | (#45317315)

It's the invention of three Googlers, including an HR VP who was quoted recently in an article that questioned the wisdom of certain Google hiring practices said to encourage 'echo chamber' hiring.

Oh the irony. First he says it's bullshit, and then he goes in on a patent for it. I'll give the guy some respect if the only reason he did it is for whatever reward Google gives for patents. As my old mentor used to say, it's ok to be a whore, just don't be a cheap whore.

Seriously, the worst thing about this type of approach is that it's bias is self-reinforcing. Hire people on this basis, and surprise, surprise, surprise, your top performers will be people that passed this test. It'll also be gamed to hell. I might be able to see something like this for LinkedIn, so long as it's only used as a small part of evaluation, but social media? As has been pointed out, most of the best people I know don't use social media. Of those that do, they're more likely to use it for family and friends than colleagues. Heck, I'd be tempted to consider an absence of social media presence as a positive thing. At a place like Google, at least that would give you insight into why so many smart people avoid social media.

Diversity be damned - we're so narcissistic that we want an army of clones. "Good fit in corporate culture" is often a euphemism for groupthink.

How is that supposed to work? (1)

mosb1000 (710161) | about 10 months ago | (#45317375)

Wouldn't someone have to use Google Plus for this to work? So this is never going to be a real thing then.

Arrogant Assumption (3, Insightful)

onyxruby (118189) | about 10 months ago | (#45317473)

It's a pretty arrogant assumption to assume that the best are where you think they are because that's where you think the best are. I'll go back in time to make my point to a chap named Charles Lindbergh who you might recall was the first to cross the Atlantic Ocean. When he accomplished his feat it surprised many, many people because he was a former pilot for the US Post Office and not a traditional glamorous background. It turned out that flying for the Post Office back then was just about the most dangerous job you could have a pilot [google.com] with 31 out of the original 40 pilots killed.

The presumption that the only people capable of doing a given thing well work at certain places is called arrogance, and that arrogance has cost entire countries their industry. History abounds with examples from the downfall of the American Auto industry to the rise of giants like Capital Group or Wal-Mart. You can't assume that just because someone didn't learn to do a given thing in a given circle of people that they can't do it. The arrogance of the circles also fails to understand that many people don't live in certain places (Silicon Valley etc) because they don't want to or because they can't. The entire concept of the social circle as being a decider for talent fails the tests of history with outsider after outsider unsurping the arrogant time and again in industry after industry.

Patenting discrimination against introverts (3, Informative)

msk (6205) | about 10 months ago | (#45317603)

Subject says it all.

And I hate that G+ tries to make a mess of my Youtube profile. It won't stop asking.

More Scare Tactics (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#45317793)

Fact is, no one is not going to hire you because you don't have social media profiles. I don't and I've never had an issue. Employers with actual things for their employees to do would rather you focus on what you were hired to do than trawl some stupid series of social media sites for tripe like animal photos, narcissistic postings and other garbage. Social media belongs outside the workplace. Full stop. Unless you are a marketing or sales droid, social media for people at work is a waste of time. If I ran a business, I would block that crap at the router.

This explains why... (1)

Arkaic (784460) | about 10 months ago | (#45317863)

... when I thought I thoughy about applying for a job listed on their site, I was prompted on whether or not I wanted the employment information pulled from my Google+ profile. I declined.

So Google Will Have NO Employees? (1)

Greyfox (87712) | about 10 months ago | (#45317947)

Bam! Google+ slam!

From what I've seen of hiring practices in general, you could pretty much replace any hiring practice with a coin flip and do no worse than these companies do. Often, probably better. They do make a pretty good indicator to a potential employee -- I won't work for any company that requires a personality test. I might still take it in order to provide the most alarming possible answers, though. I suspect a few of them out there would be far more interested in hiring me after I did that.

It seems like the best possible thing IT companies could do is get their HR department completely out of the business of candidate selection. On the outside there are a lot of fantastic programmers out there which these companies are not finding. On the inside, there are a lot more mediocre programmers and H1Bs these companies are finding. It's like their HR is trolling the wrong side of the bell curve. And when your company is incapable of growth because the in-house software is so inefficient, that's a problem.

Job Application (3, Funny)

PPH (736903) | about 10 months ago | (#45317975)

Reason for leaving last job: Fired for spending all my time updating Google+. And posting on Slashdot.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>