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US Coast Guard Ship To Attempt Rescue of 2 Icebreakers In Antarctica

samzenpus posted about 4 months ago | from the I-save-you-then-you-save-me dept.

Transportation 382

PolygamousRanchKid writes "A U.S. Coast Guard heavy icebreaker left Australia for Antarctica on Sunday to rescue more than 120 crew members aboard two icebreakers trapped in pack ice near the frozen continent's eastern edge, officials said. The 399-foot cutter, the Polar Star, is responding to a Jan. 3 request from Australia, Russia and China to assist the Russian and Chinese ships because 'there is sufficient concern that the vessels may not be able to free themselves from the ice,' the Coast Guard said in a statement. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority's Rescue Coordination Centre, which oversaw the rescue, said the Polar Star, the Coast Guard's only active heavy polar icebreaker, would take about seven days to reach Commonwealth Bay, depending on weather. Under international conventions observed by most countries, ships' crews are obliged to take part in such rescues and the owners carry the costs."

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382 comments

In the middle of summer (-1, Troll)

MacDork (560499) | about 4 months ago | (#45870605)

How's that global warming thing working out for you?

Re: In the middle of summer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870671)

It's funny that the linked story is from fox news lol

Re:In the middle of summer (5, Insightful)

DexterIsADog (2954149) | about 4 months ago | (#45870681)

How's that global warming thing working out for you?

You mean, for us? Not so well. Chaotic weather, not even, gradual warming over the entire globe, is what we can expect for quite a number of years.

Don't say that like you're not in the same boat as the rest of us.

Re:In the middle of summer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870767)

Oh go suck a cock, faggot. And lay off the Kool Aid.

Re: In the middle of summer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870901)

I'd suck your dad's but I don't have the microscope I'd need to find it

Re: In the middle of summer (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870787)

There has been NO measurable warming in the last 15 years.

Re: In the middle of summer (4, Interesting)

bunratty (545641) | about 4 months ago | (#45870917)

Here's a graph [skepticalscience.com] that shows how you're looking at things. It's called cherry picking your data.

Where's the 1998 spike? (1, Informative)

MacDork (560499) | about 4 months ago | (#45871115)

Everybody know's there's a 1998 spike. [wikipedia.org] Who's cherry picking now?

Re:Where's the 1998 spike? (3, Informative)

bunratty (545641) | about 4 months ago | (#45871317)

The two graphs use different sets of data. One shows BEST land-only surface temperature measurements, and ther other uses satellite data for land and ocean measurements. In both graphs, you can easily see the warming trend. The one you linked to [wikipedia.org] even has trend lines that show the warming. Don't you see them? It seems that it is you that is still cherry picking data, by ignoring data from before the 1998 temperature spike caused by that year's El Nino.

Re: In the middle of summer (4, Insightful)

Egdiroh (1086111) | about 4 months ago | (#45871229)

But if you zoom that graph way out you'll see that we're cooling. It's called cherry picking your data. Looking at the data in 5-year increments tells a different story then looking at it in 50 year increments tells a different story then looking at it in 500 year increments, tells a different story then looking at it in 5000 year increments and on and on and on.

We are too dumb to understand climate. Any one who calls themselves a climate expert is a huge liar, unless they put it in the context of being relative to the rest of mankind. That lack of relativity has lead to arrogance and away from science. We've seen that the climate scientists are afraid of being wrong. This is an area where our system of academia is a weakness not a strength. People are too invested in not being wrong and finding new truths. In the climate sciences it should be about being wrong and being able to better understand that. Bad predictions should be more celebrated then correct ones, because it's easier to learn from something that went wrong.

skeptics and supporters are opposite sides of the same coin of wrong headedness. There is learning to be done, and a future that is uncertain. Those are things we should be concentrating on.

MOD PARENT UP!!! (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870951)

Yeah, no measurable warming unless you COOK THE BOOKS which they are STILL DOING.
 
But be expected to be modded down. Slashdot has been overrun by the "diggers" since they destroyed their site. You know, the HuffPost type. They like to have their set like a fake coffee shop, three "reporters" or "anchors" with their iFruit slave labor built trashtops all facing the camera DIRECTLY. Not at a 10 degree angle, but DIRECTLY at the camera to show off the Apple logo and hide their wiry bodies just enough to show off their short, spiked hair, nose rings, and peeved (for no apparent reason) and smug visages.
 
You disagree with our status quo "we're the victim minority" environmentalist idea, and you're an outcast. And an IDIOT.
 
So yeah, mod parent up.

Re:In the middle of summer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870797)

It's interesting that you say "gradual warming over the entire globe" when global average temperatures are falling.

That suggests rather also that they chaotic weather is not caused by that, but instead by placebo, and that weather has always had extremes.

This is an ice age. Is that good or bad? (5, Interesting)

Toe, The (545098) | about 4 months ago | (#45870927)

There are some complex facts that usually don't get dragged into this discussion because they make it so much larger. But some interesting facts to color the warming issue are:

1. We are currently in an ice age. The current Quaternary glaciation [wikipedia.org] (i.e., the current ice age) started 2.5 million years ago.

2. Within that ice age, we are in an interglacial: a period of temporary(?) warming within the ice age. Our current interglacial is the Holocene epoch [wikipedia.org] , which started 11,700 years ago.

But as long as we still have ice caps, we are still in an ice age. If the ice caps melt, we'll know the ice age is over and we're back to what is in fact more normal temperatures for Earth.

However, it can't be said that Earth's normal warm is necessarily good for humanity. After all,

3. Humans, as in the genus Homo, evolved around 2.5 million years ago [wikipedia.org] . The same time as the the beginning of the current ice age. In other words, the adversity of the Earth's freezing put heavy evolutionary pressure on our ape ancestors.

So, cold = good? Well, remember the current interglacial started 11,700 years ago. Now that's interesting. The Old Stone Age [wikipedia.org] begins with the first humans, that ~2.5 million years ago. But...

4. The Middle Stone Age [wikipedia.org] started right around when the interglacial started. That's when humans first began to make more advanced tools, create advanced art, develop spirituality, etc. In other words, when things warmed up a bit, humanity began to flourish.

So what's good? Warm, cold, in-between? What's "natural?" 'Cause that seems to be extremely warm... unless you're talking about humans, then it's extremely cold. Or moderate.

Complex, eh?

Now, apart from global warming, the related issue that always gets short shrift is ocean acidification [wikipedia.org] , which is also caused by an abundance of CO2 in the atmosphere, and which appears to be a huge threat to life on Earth. But it's harder to understand than warming, so let's not talk about it.

Re:This is an ice age. Is that good or bad? (3, Interesting)

bunratty (545641) | about 4 months ago | (#45871059)

Not to mention that no matter what, we'll have to stop using fossil fuels one day because they'll simply run out. We have to develop alternative energy sources if we want to continue our current lifestyle with billions of humans on the planet.

Re:This is an ice age. Is that good or bad? (1)

Cinder6 (894572) | about 4 months ago | (#45871133)

Now, apart from global warming, the related issue that always gets short shrift is ocean acidification [wikipedia.org] , which is also caused by an abundance of CO2 in the atmosphere, and which appears to be a huge threat to life on Earth. But it's harder to understand than warming, so let's not talk about it.

Actually, I think that ocean acidification is easier to understand. People can handle a wide range of temperatures, such that many will scoff at the notion that a difference of a couple of degrees is problematic for the planet. But acid? People understand that acid can be dangerous. Tell them the ocean is becoming acidified, and it will make sense to them that that's probably not good for the things that live there. (Even though the most pH change, according to Wikipedia, also looks like a tiny number at -0.12).

Re:In the middle of summer (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870895)

So weather wasn't chaotic before global warming?

Re:In the middle of summer (3, Interesting)

cold fjord (826450) | about 4 months ago | (#45870903)

It will be interesting to see what happens next year.

Tornado activity hits 60-year low [usatoday.com]
2013 Atlantic hurricane season wrap-up: least active in 30 years [washingtonpost.com]

Re:In the middle of summer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870955)

People are also saying the maximum speed of cars have increased since early 20th century. Yet, when I look outside, I see plenty of cars standing still. Are we supposed to believe cars in 1901 had a negative speed?

Re:In the middle of summer (1)

DexterIsADog (2954149) | about 4 months ago | (#45871193)

It will be interesting to see what happens next year.

Tornado activity hits 60-year low [usatoday.com] 2013 Atlantic hurricane season wrap-up: least active in 30 years [washingtonpost.com]

Yes it will. Or next week. That's kind of the point.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/unseasonable-tornadoes-in-midwest-damage-illinois-towns-killing-6/2013/11/18/36c26332-5064-11e3-9e2c-e1d01116fd98_story.html

Re:In the middle of summer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45871057)

here's what i want to know about the "chaotic weather" claim.

let's just stipulate for the sake of argument that awg is real and the cause of
climate change.

what has that got to do with weather being "more chaotic". was there something magic about the way things were? or is this just nostalgia?

Re:In the middle of summer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870863)

What is wrong with you people? Seriously. Why does this even qualify as a decent troll argument? Winter is colder than summer, and summer is warmer than winter in the northern hemisphere, and it's the other way around in the southern. They're called seasons. The temperatures go up and down. They have nothing to do with longer-term climate change, which takes place over decades, centuries, and longer. Do you not understand the concept of averages? It's not like Antarctic ice is going to melt away in a century or something anyway. Annual ice melt is accelerating, but there's vast amounts left.

In this case it was wind, not temperatures, that has pushed the ice tightly together in the area where these ships are stuck.

Wind. Riiiiight... (1, Interesting)

MacDork (560499) | about 4 months ago | (#45871065)

In this case it was wind, not temperatures, that has pushed the ice tightly together in the area where these ships are stuck.

Remember, the original stuck Russian vessel was retracing the steps of a century old expedition. Funny how Sir Douglas Mawson's Antarctic expedition [wikipedia.org] didn't have this problem back in 1911 despite the fact that

Cape Denison proved to be unrelentingly windy; the average wind speed for the entire year was about 50 mph (80 km/h), with some winds approaching 200 mph.

America, FUCK YEAH! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870611)

Coming again, to save the mother fucking day yeah!

Re:America, FUCK YEAH! (0)

ganjadude (952775) | about 4 months ago | (#45870759)

not sure how quoting a movie is flamebait mods

Re:America, FUCK YEAH! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45871209)

> not sure how quoting a movie is flamebait mods

Agreed. Me and my colleagues find this phenomena confusing.

After much roundtable discussion with some of the finest minds of our Mathematics, Physics and Philosophy departments, we are leaning towards a theory that the moderator in question was perhaps unaware that the aforementioned prose was in fact a reference to the lyrics to a musical work featured in a motion picture.

Of course, our discussions are at a very primary stage. With further brainstorming and research (which we intend to complete with publication and peer review), we intend to get to the bottom of this admittedly confusing occurrence.

HTH.

One blue ship stuck upon the ice. (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870625)

Along came an icebreaker and there were...

Two blue ships, stuck upon the ice. Two blue ships, stuck upon the ice, along came an icebreaker and there were...

Three blue ships, stuck upon the ice...

Re:One blue ship stuck upon the ice. (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870747)

From http://www.uscg.mil/pacarea/cgcpolarstar/PolarStarNews.asp:

"The Polar Star is the U.S. Coast Guard’s only active heavy polar ice breaker. The ship is 399 feet in length, its maximum speed is 18 knots, it is able to continuously break six feet of ice at three knots, and able to break 21 feet of ice backing and ramming. The Polar Star is specifically designed for open-water icebreaking with a reinforced hull and special icebreaking bow."

Re:One blue ship stuck upon the ice. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870805)

So... only a tiny bit more powerful than the Aurora Australis, which is already stuck?

Re:One blue ship stuck upon the ice. (3, Informative)

cyclohazard (677922) | about 4 months ago | (#45870845)

According to the article, the Aurora Australis has continued on its planned course (with the rescued passengers from the Russian ship). The stuck ships are a Chinese icebreaker and the original Russian ship. However, the Russian ship is not an icebreaker, and so the sensationalist headline is a bit wrong.

I don't get it. (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870847)

Along came an icebreaker and there were...

Two blue ships, stuck upon the ice. Two blue ships, stuck upon the ice, along came an icebreaker and there were...

Three blue ships, stuck upon the ice...

I don't get it.

I was thinking the ice breaker was along the lines of ... "So, come to Antarctica often?"

send a nuclear sub....... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870629)

....to vaporize some of that ice with a couple of thermonuclear missiles

"near the frozen continent's eastern edge" (5, Insightful)

tsqr (808554) | about 4 months ago | (#45870637)

I could have sworn Antarctica only has a northern edge.

Re:"near the frozen continent's eastern edge" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870875)

Antarctica is not a perfect circle with the south pole smack-dab in the middle. So some parts are bound to not face north. Heck, some may even face south.

(It's not a whoosh if I'm attempting to expand upon the humor. Even if I end up failing at it.)

Re:"near the frozen continent's eastern edge" (2)

Iniamyen (2440798) | about 4 months ago | (#45871309)

I think if you were referring to a smaller eastward-facing edge of a feature of Antarctica, you should refer to it as that feature's edge (e.g. the "eastern edge of some Antarctic peninsula.") Referring to the eastern edge as belonging to Antarctica itself is misleading, for reasons already stated.

In one week... (5, Insightful)

mbone (558574) | about 4 months ago | (#45870649)

In one week will we be reading about how country X is sending an icebreaker to free the three stuck icebreakers?

Good thing it's summer down there. Wouldn't want to be stuck all winter [amazon.com] . That would be a pain.

Re:In one week... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870683)

Might as well reschedule the International Icebreakers Convention to the Arctic right now, everyone can have a jolly good bash at it!

Or, for the more paranoid among us, its a ruse by Icebreaker crews to have a excuse to finally organize the International Icebreaker Olympics!

Re:In one week... (2)

mcgrew (92797) | about 4 months ago | (#45870757)

It's early summer, it will get warmer. It's supposed to be colder here in Illinois tonight than it is in Antarctica right now.

Who pays? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870665)

Given that the Chinese icebreaker got stuck as a direct result of attempting to rescue (successfully in conjunction with an Australian icebreaker) the passengers off the Russian icebreaker, who pays the US icebreaker for the rescue of the Chinese icebreaker?

Re:Who pays? (2)

hawguy (1600213) | about 4 months ago | (#45870775)

Given that the Chinese icebreaker got stuck as a direct result of attempting to rescue (successfully in conjunction with an Australian icebreaker) the passengers off the Russian icebreaker, who pays the US icebreaker for the rescue of the Chinese icebreaker?

RTFS

Under international conventions observed by most countries, ships' crews are obliged to take part in such rescues and the owners carry the costs.

Re:Who pays? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45871261)

Which owner? The owner of the rescuing ship or the owner of the ship needing to be rescued?

This whole incident... (-1, Troll)

felrom (2923513) | about 4 months ago | (#45870701)

of people setting out to the pole at summer, to highlight the damage wrought by global warming, and then getting stuck in the ice, and then their rescuers getting stuck in the ice... it really feels as if over-the-top global warming alarmism has jumped the shark. Right here. And all excuses about how the ice is always still thick this time of year, or it's really just unlucky winds that blew it around the ship, those don't matter. People see global warming fear mongers, trapped in ice, in the summer, in the Antarctic, and their rescuers threatened by the same ice.

We'll look back in 20 years and say, "Remember when that ship got stuck in the ice on their journey to drum up fear about receding ice?"

Hell, I remember when I was in grade school in the '90s, and we were constantly told of the horrors of the hole on the ozone layer that was going to burn us to death, and the rain forests that would be 100% destroyed by 1995, suffocating all the aerobic life of the earth due to lack of oxygen. There's something in the human brain very susceptible to environmental alarmism, and it takes a really magnificent demonstration of stupidity every generation or so to snap people out of it. This is it!

Re:This whole incident... (0)

codepigeon (1202896) | about 4 months ago | (#45870739)

I don't know about you, but when it comes to the only livable planet we know of, and my current home, I would prefer we err on the side of caution.

Re:This whole incident... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870771)

The Ozone hole really was a problem in nz and australia, with skin cancer levels increasing, and people having campaigns like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tGgn5nwYtj0 . Good thing CFC levels in the atmosphere have since dropped due to extensive regulation, and the ozone hole has started closing.

It would be nice if global climate change went the same way. Average sea levels are still rising, which is a bit of a problem in a place defended by sea walls and/or river walls. (like where I live. ;-)

Re:This whole incident... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870871)

Average sea levels are rising, but temperatures are falling, doesn't that rather suggest to you that (at very least) our models of what causes the sea level to rise, and at what rate, suck, and can't be used to reliably predict anything?

Re:This whole incident... (2)

mjm1231 (751545) | about 4 months ago | (#45870993)

Your facts don't suggest anything because they are in fact false. http://www.skepticalscience.com/going-down-the-up-escalator-part-1.html [skepticalscience.com]

Re:This whole incident... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45871185)

Oh lookie, he put up a link to climate scientists denying what is actually happening. Lets take a look at the record book of what they predicted vs what is actually happening. I'll even spot you their ability to change their prdedictions over the years as they get more time with their models and more data.

Graph [blogspot.com]

Right there, anyone with any sense knows not to trust the IPCC models, period. If you are still quoting them after seeing the above you are intellecutally dishonest by choice.

Don't debate AGW supporters anymore, they know they lie.

Re:This whole incident... (1)

plover (150551) | about 4 months ago | (#45870919)

Do we know skin cancer is on the rise due to the ozone hole? There are many plausible explanations, so a simple rise in numbers won't cut it.

Re:This whole incident... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870957)

No, it is dropping due to A: People taking better measures. B: the ozone hole closing. Regulation is fixing it.

Re:This whole incident... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870975)

Do we know lung cancer is on the rise due to cigarettes? There are many plausible explanations, so a simple rise in numbers won't cut it.

Re:This whole incident... (2)

sjbe (173966) | about 4 months ago | (#45871257)

Do we know skin cancer is on the rise due to the ozone hole? There are many plausible explanations, so a simple rise in numbers won't cut it.

I don't mean to seem snide but do you really think that same thought hasn't occurred to anyone else? There are ways of testing and controlling for possible causes. Proving causation in cases like this is challenging but not impossible. It's sort of like proving that smoking causes an increase in lung cancer. It's difficult to prove in individual cases but actually much easier in populations. You check a lot of correlations, you test for overlapping, you slowly control for specific alternatives and over time you get a pretty good picture of how much of the problem is causes by the suspect phenomena.

My wife is a skin doctor and her take on the matter is that yes there appears to be some credible evidence that the ozone hole is responsible for at least some of the increase in skin cancer. The exact amount is unknown and realistically unimportant. What is important is that there appears to be a real and measurable (if imprecise) effect on the population.

Epic fail (5, Insightful)

dbIII (701233) | about 4 months ago | (#45870801)

The pack ice is trapped because a huge iceberg melted off, not because it's colder than normal.

and it takes a really magnificent demonstration of stupidity

Thank you for yours.

Re:This whole incident... (2, Insightful)

Known Nutter (988758) | about 4 months ago | (#45870811)

of people setting out to the pole at summer, to highlight the damage wrought by global warming, and then getting stuck in the ice, and then their rescuers getting stuck in the ice... it really feels as if over-the-top global warming alarmism has jumped the shark.

This bit here is pretty popular on the internet these days. Taking a single incident of global warming researchers stuck in ice and using the (rather remarkable) irony of that to debunk global warming as a whole.

My reply to that thus far has been something along the lines of me, using that same logic, being able to prove global warming is occurring by pointing out the 19% of normal snow pack in the California Sierra right now.

I am no environmental scientist, but I do know it's going to take just a bit more critical thinking than either of these two thought processes to figure the thing out.

Re:This whole incident... (0, Troll)

Rockoon (1252108) | about 4 months ago | (#45871117)

This bit here is pretty popular on the internet these days. Taking a single incident of global warming researchers stuck in ice and using the (rather remarkable) irony of that to debunk global warming as a whole.

So long as you repeatedly and disingenuously take each instance as a single instance, you make sense. The problem is that there are quite a bit of instances, most poignant of which is that southern ice has been increasing for decades, even while the alarmists were pointing at single instances of the southern ice shelf breaking off as evidence of global warming.

....meanwhile the complete lack of any recent compelling evidence of atmospheric warming is explained away by claiming that the oceans are absorbing all of it in ways and with an efficiency that we do not understand.

If it is not important that Antarctic ice melt is this year the lowest ever recorded, then what are we to make of "warmest year", "most hurricanes" and other assorted alarmisms?

The thing about science is that its supposed to be falsifiable. Why is it then that real data is completely ignored in favor of proxy data that doesnt even correlate with the real data?

Re:This whole incident... (1)

Known Nutter (988758) | about 4 months ago | (#45871183)

So long as you repeatedly and disingenuously take each instance as a single instance, you make sense.

Way to miss my point. As I said...

... I do know it's going to take just a bit more critical thinking than either of these two thought processes to figure the thing out.

My point was that many, many people on comment threads seem to be disingenuously taking the single instance of the global warming researchers' ships stuck in ice as de facto proof that global warming is bunk. My point was not to debate the merits of either position.

Re:This whole incident... (2)

angel'o'sphere (80593) | about 4 months ago | (#45871299)

South of Australia some ice breakers a stuck in pack ice.
In Australia we have a heat wave unheard of, and the summer has just started 2 weeks ago.
In Finnland we have the "hottest" winter since recorded history. At the northern polar circle, mind that, we still have + temperatures. In a real winter it would be -30 degrees there.

Re:This whole incident... (3, Insightful)

beelsebob (529313) | about 4 months ago | (#45870831)

To be fair, the hole in the ozone layer only stopped growing because we actually succeeded in not pumping out CFCs.

Re:This whole incident... (5, Insightful)

mcgrew (92797) | about 4 months ago | (#45870855)

Hell, I remember when I was in grade school in the '90s, and we were constantly told of the horrors of the hole on the ozone layer that was going to burn us to death, and the rain forests that would be 100% destroyed by 1995

They didn't happen because people took measures to mitigate them. The ozone layer was disappearing because of CFCs. Now that we don't use them in spray cans and air conditioners any more the hole is shrinking and should be gone in another 100 years.

You're like the people who scoff at the Y2K Armageddon that didn't happen. It didn't happen because a lot of folks did a lot of hard work to keep it from happening.

Had everyone shrugged and done nothing like you propose with global warming the ozone would still be disappearing and the Y2K meltdown would have been serious.

Re:This whole incident... (2)

mbone (558574) | about 4 months ago | (#45870873)

I think that right wing talking points jumped the shark years ago.

By the way, the Ozone hole was saved by concerted international effort [wikipedia.org] . Too bad that was prevented this time around by a small band of billionaires and their useful idiots.

Funny but not evidence of anything (2)

sjbe (173966) | about 4 months ago | (#45870979)

it really feels as if over-the-top global warming alarmism has jumped the shark.

It's GLOBAL warming. Not local warming. The fact that some random ship go caught in sea ice carries precisely zero relevance, nor does the fact that they happened to be studying global warming. While amusing and a bit ironic this ship getting stuck doesn't remotely constitute evidence against temperatures rising globally. Last time I checked the Antarctic hasn't thawed and thus it is a very dangerous place to sail regardless of time of year. There always is danger from ice in that part of the world.

We'll look back in 20 years and say, "Remember when that ship got stuck in the ice on their journey to drum up fear about receding ice?"

People who do that will basically be publicly acknowledging their ignorance of science. While it may turn out that fears of global warming end up being overstated to some degree, this incident is not going to be relevant in proving that fact one way or the other. Furthermore a cavalier attitude about something like global warming is incredibly dangerous. We only have the one planet to live on and if we want to keep living on it as a species we would to well to tread carefully.

Re:This whole incident... (4, Interesting)

idji (984038) | about 4 months ago | (#45870987)

go and look at Ozone depletion [wikipedia.org] and see that the alarmism was worth it because the world did ban CFCs and the charts show the improvement since. What we need is global coordinated action on the issues of today
Icebreakers being stuck in ice doesn't say much about climate change - incidents of such icebreakers stuck in ice over many decades may say something. Don't confuse an incident with a trend
I am sure there are many stupid Americans in New England seeing how amazingly cold it is this week and mocking Climate Change. (I live in Central Europe and we have at the moment one of the hottest Januaries on record). Climate Change predicts weather extremes because there is more energy available in weather systems to push to hotter and colder extremes.
That thick ice in Antarctica could be an example of climate change if, for example, more ice is rolling off the land faster, or climate change has changed currents to push more ice into that bay. Only objective longterm observations can help here.
There are problems with Alarmism, but it was right with Acid Rain in the 1970s, leaded petrol and Ozone in the 80's - those problems were reversed - and the scientific community is in consensus that CO2 today is a far more serious issue and we need alarmism before we reach tipping points.
I would rather take action with alarmism, then do nothing out of cynicism while species go extinct and Africans and Bangladeshis try to emigrate in their millions.

Re:This whole incident... (1)

mjm1231 (751545) | about 4 months ago | (#45871013)

Those are interesting examples. In each of those cases, the problem was solved by actually doing something (for example, greatly reducing CFC emissions). So, if by "snap people out of it" you mean they should take active steps to reverse or prevent a problem, your examples lend good support to that claim.

Re:This whole incident... (2)

gnasher719 (869701) | about 4 months ago | (#45871017)

of people setting out to the pole at summer, to highlight the damage wrought by global warming, and then getting stuck in the ice, and then their rescuers getting stuck in the ice... it really feels as if over-the-top global warming alarmism has jumped the shark. Right here

It would depend on these people's IQ. If you start with for example 20 feet of ice, then no ship is going to get stuck in there because they can't get in. If it melts to 10 feet of ice and breaks up because of global warming, then they get stuck.

Re:This whole incident... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45871169)

People will use any story to advance their ideas, goals. Never let a good tragedy go to waste. Make a possible plausible outcome with some unprovable scientific rhetoric, repeat it as often as you can - BAM: call to action. People fall for it because it makes the news, whose reporters couldn't spell objectivity with a dictionary and coincidentally have their own bias in their reporting.We are having record cold (East coast), I could use a little global warming about now.

Re:This whole incident... (2)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 4 months ago | (#45871217)

Congratulations for what will no doubt be the most idiotic comment attached to this story. Something we've come to expect from right wing science deniers.

1. The Akademik Shokalskiy was retracing the Douglas Mawson expedition conducted a century ago. The glacier in their vicinity was named after Xaviar Metz who died on the expedition. It's notable this original expedition was not by ship. It is the subject of David Roberts's book "Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story in the History of Exploration"

2. The ozone layer hole issue has been ameliorated because the nations of the world got together and banned the CFCs that were causing it. Amazing how science works, eh?

3. You must have a really bad memory. Or maybe you are just a liar. Nobody was predicting loss of rain forests by 1995. Brazil has 5.4 km sq of rain forest, since 1970 they have lost about 10%. Long term it's an issue, which is being addressed by legislation.

Re:This whole incident... (2)

gtall (79522) | about 4 months ago | (#45871283)

Yes, and the chlorofluorocarbons, you do remember those don't you, were and still are one of the major contributors to the ozone holes. The Montreal Protocol which started in the late 1980's, got a head of steam in the 1990's, and continues to this day pretty much banished chlorofluorocarbons from production. The expectation is the ozone holes will get back to normal around 2050 when chlorofluorocarbon have left the atmosphere.

And as someone below mentioned, there's been quite a large increase in skin cancer in the S. latitudes as a result of the ozone holes. There's something very susceptible to environmental blinkers, and it takes a really magnificent demonstration of intelligence every generation to snap people out of their blindness towards environmental dangers. This is it!

Similar story (2)

PsyMan (2702529) | about 4 months ago | (#45870703)

I once got a chainsaw stuck in a tree trunk, 3 borrowed chainsaws later I got them all out. Thought I was going to end up with an expensive redneck garden art feature though.

nuke the ice........ (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870707)

and nuke it NOW

send in the navy to NUKE THE ICE

The situation as described in BASIC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870733)

10 STUCKSHIP=1
20 PRINT "Oh No!!! we have ";STUCKSHIP ; " ships trapped in the ice!"
30 LET STUCKSHIP=STUCKSHIP+1
40 GOTO 20
50 END

nuke nuke nuke nuke nuke nuke nuke that ice..... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870743)

nuke it 'til it's STEAM

then nuke nuke nuke nuke nuke nuke
nuke it AGAIN

and watch them fires GLEAM!!!!

International Cooperation and a Happy New Year. (5, Insightful)

wjcofkc (964165) | about 4 months ago | (#45870751)

An Western European led research vessel gets stuck in the ice. A Chinese ice breaker comes to the rescue. The Chinese ice breaker gets stuck in the ice. A Russian ice breaker with an international crew comes to the rescue. The Russian ice breaker gets stuck in the Ice. Now we have a US Coast Guard ice breaker on the way to save the day. The moral of the story? When you subtract nasty international politics from the equation, we really can get along.

Re:International Cooperation and a Happy New Year. (5, Funny)

DarkOx (621550) | about 4 months ago | (#45870791)

Or at least get collectively owned by mother nature.

Re:International Cooperation and a Happy New Year. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870931)

Yeah, it shows what we can do when we all work together.

Serially fuck up big-time.

Re:International Cooperation and a Happy New Year. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870949)

For a second there, it sounded like you were about to tell a variant on the "Walks into a bar" joke.

Re:International Cooperation and a Happy New Year. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870961)

Or "use the right tool for the job". Don't send an icebreaker that can break up to 2 meters into an ice field that's already near that.

And there's no russian ship sitting in the ice by now. It's just the initial australian with the scientists/tourists and the chinese one. The one the US is sending now can break up to 6 m ice, that should be sufficient here...

A US Coast Guard Icebreaker? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870795)

Why would the US Coast Guard own any icebreakers? We don't have any deep ice around our coastlines.

Re:A US Coast Guard Icebreaker? (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870885)

Umm, yes we do.

Lake Superior, for example, sometimes has 6 to 12 feet of ice, and the Coast Guard opens channels in the spring for shipping to proceed as early in the season as possible.

There can be ice around Alaska coastline as well, and Coast Guard resources are used to free stuck ships.

Re:A US Coast Guard Icebreaker? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870905)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaska

Re:A US Coast Guard Icebreaker? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870969)

Why would the US Coast Guard own any icebreakers? We don't have any deep ice around our coastlines.

Forgetting about something, are we?

You must be related to the tourist that gets off the cruise ship in Juneau and asks where they can exchange dollars for Alaskan money.

Isn't it ironic? (0)

billcarson (2438218) | about 4 months ago | (#45870799)

A expedition trying to prove global warming gets stuck in the ice?

Re:Isn't it ironic? (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45871289)

Yes, it is, two-point-four million boy.

Now STFU and allow the grown-ups their time to themselves.

international convention (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870851)

didn't *require* the u.s. ship to travel all the way down there to perform the rescue. summary is fucked, as usual.

the u.s. is doing the rescue mission because it was asked to and because the u.s. government is in desperate need of good publicity for a change.

Cost/Price/Payment (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870913)

Love how, as soon as the USians got involved, the subject of payment came up.

For The Love Of God! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45870933)

For the love of God, Slashdot. Please stop forcing this beta.slashdot.org pile of horseshit on me! Please!

  Your Web 3.5 blog is abhorrent.

Glad to help you commies (0)

amightywind (691887) | about 4 months ago | (#45871001)

Now, lets talk about cost. China, we'll take the South China Sea, and assume you will stop harassing Japan over the Senkacu Islands. Ruskies, hand over Snowden for, er, questioning.

It could still be political... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45871075)

in 100 years time when everyone is clamoring for the last planetary resources in Antarctica, it certainly wouldn't hurt the US claim that they were the only country 100 years ago who were operating a reasonable maritime presence in the area, everyone else kept getting stuck. Therefore oil belong to us bitches.

I suggest a new strategy: (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45871093)

Let the ice win.

Here we come (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45871251)

Here comes USA to save the day..

Regardless of your opinions on global politics, budgets, or political party, you must admit our armed forced almost always prove to be totally bad ass.

but do they really need *rescue* (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45871279)

This was a polar ship, presumably able to be iced in, carrying months worth of supplies. Heck, polar explorers used to deliberately let their ships be iced in over winter to provide a secure base of operations.

Oh, it was also carrying "tourists" in addition to the crew and scientists. I guess the tour must go on

while you still "down" there (1, Funny)

fredan (54788) | about 4 months ago | (#45871311)

you going to see that the japs doesn't kill any whales, right?
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