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How Do You Move a City?

samzenpus posted about 7 months ago | from the pick-up-and-go dept.

Technology 172

Zothecula writes "The town of Kiruna in Lapland, Sweden, is known for its Jukkasjårvi Ice Hotel and for hosting the recent Arctic Council summit. It also sits within the Arctic Circle, on one of the world's richest deposits of iron ore. Now in danger of collapse due to extensive deep mining, the city center is to be relocated."

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SubjectsInCommentsAreStupid (1, Funny)

lesincompetent (2836253) | about 7 months ago | (#45912683)

Earthquake.

Re:SubjectsInCommentsAreStupid (5, Funny)

xevioso (598654) | about 7 months ago | (#45912861)

Especially if they Built This City on Rock and Roll

Re:SubjectsInCommentsAreStupid (4, Funny)

Gareth Iwan Fairclough (2831535) | about 7 months ago | (#45913603)

Especially if they Built This City on Rock and Roll

Surely one would require a starship for that?

Re:SubjectsInCommentsAreStupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913301)

it's climate change

Re:SubjectsInCommentsAreStupid (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 7 months ago | (#45913767)

is it really that much worse living at the bottom of a deep hole?

How Do You Move a City? (2)

SternisheFan (2529412) | about 7 months ago | (#45912691)

Slowly and carefully.

Re:How Do You Move a City? (4, Funny)

lgw (121541) | about 7 months ago | (#45912741)

The same way you move a file across filesystems: copy and delete.

Re:How Do You Move a City? (2)

icebike (68054) | about 7 months ago | (#45913327)

Exactly.

Its not like there is any rush. This has been done many times, for other mines. Some cities in Northern Minnesota have been moved for open pit mines. You simply forbid building where the danger zone.

Just put up a couple big malls in the desired spot and the downtown will more or less move itself.

Re:How Do You Move a City? (2)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 7 months ago | (#45914451)

The same way you move a file across filesystems: copy and delete.

"Don't copy that city!" -- the architects' trade union.

Re:How Do You Move a City? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45912761)

How Do You Move a City?

With a very moving song?

Re:How Do You Move a City? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45912943)

I got out the old ouija board and asked Johnny Cash how he would do it:

I'd do it one piece at a time
And it wouldn't cost me a dime

Simple. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45912717)

Attach a stardrive to it, after getting a few Zero Point Modules.

Re:Simple. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913535)

Or, if you only have one zpm, build a geothermal energy rig in the nearest ocean, and use it to boost the initial launch..

Chinese (4, Interesting)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 7 months ago | (#45912719)

Ask the Chinese. They moved 1.3 million people, including several cities, to make way for the Three Gorges Dam.

Re:Chinese (5, Informative)

Jonathunder (105885) | about 7 months ago | (#45912781)

Or ask Hibbing, Minnesota [wikipedia.org] . From 1919 to 1921, the entire city moved about two miles to make way for what became the largest open-pit iron mine in the world.

Re:Chinese (2)

Austrian Anarchy (3010653) | about 7 months ago | (#45912911)

Or ask Hibbing, Minnesota [wikipedia.org] . From 1919 to 1921, the entire city moved about two miles to make way for what became the largest open-pit iron mine in the world.

Home of Robert Zimmerman, aka Bob Dylan [youtube.com] . Also, that baseball home run champ, Roger Maris.

Re:Chinese (4, Interesting)

sixsixtysix (1110135) | about 7 months ago | (#45913321)

Said mining company also built the high school ($4million), which I didn't appreciate during time I was there, but after seeing other shitty, cookie-cutter public schools around the country, I take great pride of having attended. I do believe it had the first (or one of; definitely before the white house) indoor swimming pools. Sample of documentary about it. [youtube.com]

Re:Chinese (3, Informative)

Karl Cocknozzle (514413) | about 7 months ago | (#45913829)

Or ask Hibbing, Minnesota [wikipedia.org] . From 1919 to 1921, the entire city moved about two miles to make way for what became the largest open-pit iron mine in the world.

I'm pretty sure the Simpsons did it, too...

Ahh yes, here we are: Trash of the Titans, S9 E22 [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Chinese (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45912785)

Ask the Chinese. They moved 1.3 million people, including several cities, to make way for the Three Gorges Dam.
 
Flood the area and the people move themselves?

Re:Chinese (3, Informative)

SJHillman (1966756) | about 7 months ago | (#45913367)

Nope, they built entire new cities for the people to move into and relocated shrines brick by brick. Netflix has a documentary on it... really quite impressive.

Re:Chinese (1)

fatphil (181876) | about 7 months ago | (#45912871)

Pripyat probably did it quicker - 45000 in a matter of days.
However, they left all the buildings behind. And most stuff they owned.

Re:Chinese (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913385)

Zzzzzzzzzzz...

Why not just fill the mine? (1)

scorp1us (235526) | about 7 months ago | (#45912725)

It seems to me if you approach it section by section, you can just pour concrete or other filler back in to the section. Using offset parallel channels, you can brace your mine the same time you dig out adjacent channels.

Re:Why not just fill the mine? (1)

tomhath (637240) | about 7 months ago | (#45912783)

You could back fill with rock from the surface. But it's cheaper to move the city and let the land subside.

Re:Why not just fill the mine? (2)

MiskatonicAcademic (2620997) | about 7 months ago | (#45912875)

It's still an active mine with a huge body of ore beneath the city. The problem is not mainly that the rock is like swiss cheese under Kiruna, but that further mining risk destroying the city. Filling it up would require new tunnels to be built anyway in order to get the ore up, hence the need for unorthodox moves.

Re:Why not just fill the mine? (2)

Austrian Anarchy (3010653) | about 7 months ago | (#45912923)

Or you could have the people who want the iron ore to buy what is above it.

Re:Why not just fill the mine? (1)

mysidia (191772) | about 7 months ago | (#45914051)

Or you could have the people who want the iron ore to buy what is above it.

That might work for gold, but the iron ore isn't valuable enough.

They would rather instead force people to move, and offer them subsidized loans to build the replacement structure outside the area where there is iron ore to be mined.

Re:Why not just fill the mine? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45914561)

It is in Sweden.

The *goverment* wants to mine more ore. Hence you will move, without appeal.

How Do You Move a City? (1)

aardvarkjoe (156801) | about 7 months ago | (#45912727)

Here I was thinking that this would be an advertisement for some bigass truck.

(Which most of their customer base will buy to tool around the suburbs in.)

What the? (4, Informative)

TubeSteak (669689) | about 7 months ago | (#45912749)

The iron mine is owned by the Swedish government, and it is the mining company who will be paying for the townâ(TM)s re-location. It might seem there is a pretty strong case for shutting down the mines and opting for the preservation of natural environment, and of the longstanding community. But this iron mine is far too important to Swedenâ(TM)s economy, accounting for just under one percent of the countryâ(TM)s overall GNP and a significant portion of the world's iron supply.

Well that answers all my questions right there.

AND THE POPULATION OF 17 !! WHAT OF THEM !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45912757)

You cannot just up and move 17 eskimos from the only home they have ever known !! These people have dozens of words for snow, but have no concept of U-Haul !!

Re:AND THE POPULATION OF 17 !! WHAT OF THEM !! (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about 7 months ago | (#45912989)

They're not Eskimos. They're Sami. And they have 180 words for snow.

Re:AND THE POPULATION OF 17 !! WHAT OF THEM !! (1)

MiskatonicAcademic (2620997) | about 7 months ago | (#45913063)

Most of them are neither. And they have even more words for tobacco.

Keep digging (2)

oldhack (1037484) | about 7 months ago | (#45912779)

keep digging and it will move vertically (generally, on the whole).

Ask the EPA (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45912813)

I think the government tells you what your property is worth, gives the $ to you, and then kicks you off the land. The US gov EPA has done it a few times after areas become contaminated or unlivable from natural disasters or decades of some company or the EPA contaminating the area in one way or another.

Tar Creek in Oklahoma comes to mind...

Re:Ask the EPA (2)

MiskatonicAcademic (2620997) | about 7 months ago | (#45912909)

Correct. Expropriation is done on the basis on market value in Sweden. Guess what the market value is when there's a mine about to devour the house? Exactly the same issue with the town of Malmberget, located 100 km or so south of Kiruna, where the mine has created several holes mid-town that has grown and engulfed numerous buildings over the last few decades.

Easy (5, Funny)

allcoolnameswheretak (1102727) | about 7 months ago | (#45912815)

1. Build settlers until the population is reduced to one.
2. Build one final settler.
3. Confirm that you want to disband the city.
4. Settle somewhere else.

Re:Easy (2)

Culture20 (968837) | about 7 months ago | (#45913031)

I prefer the MOM method: allow raiders to conquer a city, reconquer it, and raze it. Costs some fame, but that's easily regained defending the new city.

Re:Easy (0)

allcoolnameswheretak (1102727) | about 7 months ago | (#45913065)

Ah, you beat me to it. :)

Faster Method (1, Redundant)

allcoolnameswheretak (1102727) | about 7 months ago | (#45913061)

Actually, if you are in a hurry, you can gift the city to an unfriendly neighbor, like Norway, and then attack it relentlessly until it is conquered, and then raze it to the ground. Move all the corpses to the sweet spot and cast a high-level necromancy spell.

Re:Faster Method (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913121)

What, what? This happened?

Re:Faster Method (1)

narcc (412956) | about 7 months ago | (#45913727)

Not even close -- low-level at best.

In this town a certain man, very wealthy, but, as it afterwards appeared, a great rogue, having been buried, after his death sallied forth (by the contrivance, as it is believed, of Satan) out of his grave by night, and was borne hither and thither, pursued by a pack of dogs with loud barkings; thus striking great terror into the neighbors, and returning to his tomb before daylight. After this had continued for several days, and no one dared to be found out of doors after dus, -- for each dreaded an encounter with this deadly monster, -- the higher and middle classes of the people held a necessary investigation into what was requisite to be done; the more simple among them fearing, in the event of negligence, to be soundly beaten by this prodigy of teh grave; but the wiser shrewedly concluding that were a remedy further delayed, the atmosphere, infected and corrupted by the constant whirlings through it of teh pestiferous corpse, would engender disease and death to a great extent; the necessity of providing against which was shown by frequent examples in similar cases. ...

It would not be easy to believe that the corpses of the deat should sally (I know not by what agency) from their graves, and should wander about to the terror or destruction of the living, and again return to the tomb, which of its own accord spontaneously opened to receive them, did not frequent examples, occurring in our own times, suffice to establish this fact, to the truth of which there is abundant testimony. ...

Moreover, were I to write down all the instances of this kind which I have ascertained to have befallen in our times, the undertaking would be beyond measure laborious and troublesome

-- William of Newburgh in The history of William of Newburgh: The Chronicles of Robert de Monte [google.com]

Katrina - perfect time to move a city (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45912839)

When hurricane Katrina trashed New Orleans, it was the perfect time to relocate to a more sensible place. But everyone had the "we're tough and we'll rebuild" attitude, instead of the "this is a great opportunity to build in a better spot". So they rebuild in the same place so it can happen all over again.

Re:Katrina - perfect time to move a city (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45912933)

In my uncles case he didn't have a choice - the insurance would cover cleaning and rebuilding his property, nothing else was covered.

Re:Katrina - perfect time to move a city (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913131)

On an individual level, probably 99.9% didn't have a choice, like your uncle.
It's a shame that on a higher level everyone could have gotten together and moved the whole place.
I wouldn't be surprised if many of the places will be full of mold and whatnot, since insurance would not give them the money to do it right.

Re:Katrina - perfect time to move a city (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 7 months ago | (#45914553)

It's a port city at the mouth of a huge river with vast amounts of trade along it's length.
There is no better spot

Put Detroit Politicians In Charge Of The City (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45912859)

They moved 1.3M people out of the city! 18k should be a snap for them.

+1 funny (1)

raymorris (2726007) | about 7 months ago | (#45914237)

That's funny.

our 2010 stay in the Ice Hotel (1)

turkeydance (1266624) | about 7 months ago | (#45912867)

they were already moving things then. normally, Slashdot is only 2 years behind.

Just leave (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about 7 months ago | (#45912889)

To borrow from a children's rhyme:
Here are the streets
Here is the steeple
Look in the houses
The city's the people!

At last the question make sense (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45912891)

I mean the question you get when applying for a job at Microsoft or Google and they ask you how you'd move mount Fuji.

Re:At last the question make sense (1)

istartedi (132515) | about 7 months ago | (#45913667)

I mean the question you get when applying for a job at Microsoft or Google and they ask you how you'd move mount Fuji.

Easy. They didn't give me a deadline or a destination, so all I have to do is wait and let continental drift take it wherever it's going.

If they clarify and specify something like, "10 meters east by next Tuesday", then the next best solution is to just hack all the mapping software.

If they start getting snippy and say, "really physically move it 10 meters east by next Tuesday", then at some point you just have to start giving them basic lessons in volcanology. You could also ask the Google guys why their search-engine suggestions know "volcanology", but Chrome spell-check doesn't. Then when they verify that and see that the interviewee has pointed out the possibility for smarter integration, they may just forget the whole stupid thing.

Re:At last the question make sense (2)

myowntrueself (607117) | about 7 months ago | (#45914031)

From the daily WTF:

Not too long ago, I applied for systems administrator job. The interviews were going very well, and I had to return twice because they flew people in to meet me. One of them was a guy who, God love him, seemed like a great person but his interview skills were a little hackneyed. He asked a lot of Job Interview 2.0 questions, which, up until this point, I had never heard of.

"If you had to move Mount Fuji," he asked, "how would you do it?" I recall thinking, "why is he asking this? What does he mean by Mount Fuji?"

"You mean, Mount Fuji, the volcano in Japan?"

He looked confused I asked. "Er, yes. How would you move it?"

What he didn't know was I was a science fiction author as well. I spent a lot of time asking odd questions like these. "Why kind of life form might evolve on Mars?" and so on. But like a writer, I had to have a principal motive of the protagonist.

"Why?" I asked.

The man chuckled as if he had never thought about that before. "Just how would you move it?"

I felt I didn't explain my question. "I mean, who is my customer? Why does he or she wish to move Mount Fuji? I mean, to move Mount Fuji seems like the middle of a plan; it's a verb that has an end mean. Like, does my client want the rubble? Do they want to move it 10 meters to the left? What drives such a vast plan?"

"Yes, say you want to move it... a mile to the left. How would you do it?"

I rolled my eyes in thought. "Wow, um. First, we'd have to get the permission of the Japanese government. I would imagine my client would have to be pretty persuasive to get past that hurdle; Mount Fuji is a national treasure of Japan. Whole economies are connected to it. It would vastly interrupt tourist industry and all surrounding towns connected to the mountain."

The man looked at me, completely dumbstruck.

"The environment impact would also have to be addressed. One does not simply move a volcano. I would imagine I'd study the geological hot spot in detail because once an exposed magma chamber were released, I could only imagine the risk of millions of people with hot lava, volcanic gasses, and the pyroclastic flow and eruption potential. Then you'd have to explain to all the environmentalists and convince the scientific world that this sort of project was necessary. And who is funding such a project?"

"You're over-thinking this," he said, "I just want to know how you would technically."

"Again, for what end result? I can't answer that without knowing what the client wishes."

"He just wants to move it."

"But why? I could imagine a lot cheaper and less destructive ways to get what someone might want. And frankly, what would be different than taking a kilometer of rock from one side and slapping it on the other? Is that considered moving it?"

He paused for a bit. "How man piano tuners are there in the United States?"

I paused. "This... is for the systems administration job, right?"

I didn't get the job. Not because I didn't understand his project prospective, but the following Monday, they had huge layoffs and a hiring freeze.

Re:At last the question make sense (1)

istartedi (132515) | about 7 months ago | (#45914349)

LOL, as far as I can recollect I've never heard this. Swear on a stack of Bibles. The 10 meters is a pure coincidence. Of course, questions like that have become cliches and I'm sure there are plenty of other stories like that. My favorite is always, "If you could be any animal, what would you be?" with a response of "What kind of animals are you hiring?" and the interviewee gets the job.

Re:At last the question make sense (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 7 months ago | (#45914559)

I love that example. It points out so many of the stupid aspects of the "move Mt Fuji" question.

Been there done that in MN (1, Informative)

thejuggler (610249) | about 7 months ago | (#45912931)

Ask Hibbing, MN how they moved their city when it was found to be sitting on a huge Iron Ore deposit. They did it.

Soldiers Grove, WI relocated and solarized in 1979 (3, Informative)

An dochasac (591582) | about 7 months ago | (#45912949)

This has been done before. Soldgier's Grove Wisconsin [wikipedia.org] was moved due to flooding by the Kickapoo river. One interesting outcome is that this happened in 1979 during a time of rapidly ising energy prices so the new business district was designed to be heated by solar energy. Several million residents who lived in towns near China's 3-gorges dam were also relocated.

Re:Soldiers Grove, WI relocated and solarized in 1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913153)

This has been done before. Soldgier's Grove Wisconsin [wikipedia.org] was moved due to flooding by the Kickapoo river. One interesting outcome is that this happened in 1979 during a time of rapidly ising energy prices so the new business district was designed to be heated by solar energy. Several million residents who lived in towns near China's 3-gorges dam were also relocated.

They moved several million Chinese residents in 1979 due to flooding of the Kickapoo river? That seems odd.

Is this an "Ask Slashdot"-question or something? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45912999)

No! We will not do your job for you.

Very carefully (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913001)

Very carefully...

Betteridge's law of headlines says... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913015)

No!

Dillon, CO has moved several times (1)

rwyoder (759998) | about 7 months ago | (#45913079)

Re:Dillon, CO has moved several times (1)

pspahn (1175617) | about 7 months ago | (#45914003)

They flooded it once, so how did it move several times? Or are you simply referring to the sprawl known as Dilverthorne?

Placate the balrog (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913099)

'nuff said...

Isn't it obvious? (1)

GeNmA (3492665) | about 7 months ago | (#45913183)

You move it SpongeBob Style

They Dug Too Greedy, They Dug Too Deep (2)

l0ungeb0y (442022) | about 7 months ago | (#45913237)

Maybe they can open a Petting Zoo featuring that Balrog of Morgoth they have unleashed.

Ask Superman (1)

HalAtWork (926717) | about 7 months ago | (#45913293)

Or copy the city like Springfield. See? Cartoons have all the answers.

Do nothing (1)

Chemisor (97276) | about 7 months ago | (#45913323)

Easy. Just do nothing and the city will move itself. Down.

No wonder my compass is off (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913347)

They keep digging up all that iron ore, so close to the north pole, who knows where my compass will point next.

Jukkasjärvi (4, Informative)

hsa (598343) | about 7 months ago | (#45913379)

Even TFA got it wrong. It is Jukkasjärvi, not Jukkasjårvi.

Direct translation is "The Lake of Jukkas". And "The Loke of Jukkas" sounds funny (å is pronounced that way) in native Finnish tongue.

Yeah, it is so close to Finland, the name is in Finnish, even though it is a part of Sweden.

Valmeyer, IL (1)

edbob (960004) | about 7 months ago | (#45913423)

Valmeyer, Illinois was moved after the flood of 1993. I think that a lot of these communities that are mentioned are somewhat smaller than Kiruna. The linked article seems to say that they intend to move the town center farther west, but it is the west end of the town that is in danger of collapse. I would think moving the center farther east would make more sense in this case.

Leigh Creek (1)

Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) | about 7 months ago | (#45913447)

Peter Militch was born in Leigh Creek, a town of 900 people that was about 200 miles from the next town and 400 miles from the nearest real city. Leigh Creek was a government owned town - the government owned all the houses, "even the pub," said Peter. "There was no television, no radio, and only a couple of phones in the town. A couple of years ago the government figured out that the town lay right over the biggest seam of coal in Australia and bulldozed the town and built a new town for the inhabitants [researchandideas.com] ," Peter added. "So the town where I grew up is now a hole in the ground, 3 miles long and half a mile wide."

Bitter Local (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913465)

Nice to see my hometown on Slashdot!

Personally, I view the move as a necessary evil.
I prefer the old Town Hall to the plans for the new one, the relocation plans are realistic but will locate the town in a valley, (we're currently on an mountain) and I doubt the competency of the municipal politicians who are supposed to represent the citizens side in the negotiations with the (in my oppinion) much more powerful and skilled mining company.
We will get a cool cable railway though town, though. Unless it gets scrapped due to budget concerns. (Hint: it will.)

There are also worries that Kiruna will become a new Malmberget, a neighbouring community that has been split up by mining activities by the very same company.
Houses might lose their value [google.se] (Googletranslated) and risk standing alone next to the ravine in the years between ones and ones neighbours relocations.
Not moving isn't really an option, as the mines employ a huge share of the towns population, either directly or via subcontractors.

There's more information about the competition at the Swedish Association of Architects website:
Town Hall competition, Googletranslated [google.se]
City Center competition, Googletranslated [google.se] , PDFs in english to the right.
(Note that the winning team are cited as sources in TFA.)

Posting as AC as I didn't get an account ten years ago and missed out on those lovely low number IDs.
And the neighbouring villages name is Jukkasjärvi. It is a Finnish/meänkieli name, and they don't even use "å"! (Except in Swedish loanwords.)

Re:Bitter Local (1)

Antonovich (1354565) | about 7 months ago | (#45914429)

Posting as AC as I didn't get an account ten years ago and missed out on those lovely low number IDs.

What, exactly, does that have to do with the price of fish? I don't exactly have a low ID either but I rarely see this mentioned unless you are talking absolute rubbish, which you are not... Or maybe you are? Posting as AC is somehow less suspicious than having a high ID? Is this some Swedish thing I'm missing?

Not hard (1)

samsonaod (1794936) | about 7 months ago | (#45913469)

Ask the people of Detroit!

We move this city... (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about 7 months ago | (#45913475)

... the same way we built it - on rock and roll

And now the song is stuck in your head, too. You're welcome.

Just wait (0)

ATestR (1060586) | about 7 months ago | (#45913479)

Sooner or later, the City Center will move all by itself... vertically.

How to move a city (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913485)

Spindizzies!

James Blish (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 7 months ago | (#45913843)

Mod parent up

Spindizzies were invented before thte Stargate people came up with Atlantis

Simple, really (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913615)

A REALLY big 3D scanner and a REALLY big 3D printer. It's the future, folks.

Well Duh. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913627)

Use it's Stardrive and fly it to the new location...

several options (1)

tyme (6621) | about 7 months ago | (#45913655)

You could use a spindizzy [wikipedia.org] , you could use volucite [wikipedia.org] , or you could just have it roll [thenightland.co.uk] on a road [thenightland.co.uk] (though that appears to be more realistic [techyum.com] than it might seem).

The usual way (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913657)

with a fuckton of money.

500 MT (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913749)

A 500 Mega Tonne thermonuclear detonation at 1 km above ground!

According to the UN agencies, Global Warming aka Climate Change is caused by Humans.

To end Global Warming aka Climate Change, kill Humans.

Simple arithmetic.

Ha ha

Re:500 MT (1)

rossdee (243626) | about 7 months ago | (#45913853)

You put the bomb under the city (Orion style)
Ever read Footfall (Niven/Pournelle)

Alternatively you could put it on rails (inverted world by Christopher Priest)

Give me 275 tons of wood, 100 tons of stone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45913917)

and I'll show you how to move a Town Center.

Re:Give me 275 tons of wood, 100 tons of stone (1)

crutchy (1949900) | about 7 months ago | (#45914337)

"you require more vespian gas"

Osborn, Ohio did it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45914065)

In 1918.

In this area, we don't mess around: we have a big flood, we build a SERIOUS flood control system to avoid having it happen again.

That's the Dayton Way.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osborn,_Ohio

Hide a cloaked ship with a holodeck in the ocean (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45914187)

Data: I seem to be missing several memory engrams.
[Geordi shows him several microchips he is holding in his hand]
Data: There they are.

Be careful of overly curious androids.

Re:Hide a cloaked ship with a holodeck in the ocea (2)

crutchy (1949900) | about 7 months ago | (#45914333)

sudo mv /big_hole/a_city /away_from_big_hole/a_city

PoisonThe Water (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45914269)

Cholera, diarrhea, dysentery are very known and in sufficient 'dosage' very lethal.

To combat Global Warming, Humans must die. Humans and Al Gore much die equally quickly.

That is the way to Christian salvation.

Humanity wants a fight, Give them a fight, Death to the Enemy, Death to the Humans and Al Gore. Fight my brothers fight.

Re:PoisonThe Water (1)

crutchy (1949900) | about 7 months ago | (#45914335)

Humans and Al Gore much die equally quickly

i knew al gore wasn't human!

Easy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45914297)

Just ask Patrick.

I know! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#45914317)

David Copperfield!

Don't know why it hasn't been posted yet. (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 7 months ago | (#45914569)

Huge empty space underneath?
Don't move it. Just built all the new buildings so that they retract into the geofront :)
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