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Rome Police Use Twitter To Battle Illegal Parking

samzenpus posted about a year ago | from the shame-your-neighbor dept.

Twitter 157

cartechboy writes "Illegal parking has always been a major problem in Rome. More than half of Rome's 2.7 million residents use private vehicles, and the ancient city has a staggering ratio of 70 cars per 100 residents. So many residents park, uh, creatively. But now authorities think they've found a way to fight bad parking using social media. Basically, they've asked residents to post photos of bad parking jobs to Twitter. In December, the Italian cops began encouraging smart phone users to snap pics of illegally parked cars and tweet those photos to the department's Twitter account. The new system, which was created by Raffaele Clemente, Rome's chief of traffic police, seems to be working. In the first 30 days, police received more than 1,000 complaints tweeted to their account; (one example is here). Officials were able to respond to around 740 and hand out citations."

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Yea... Good Luck With That. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134113)

Hey, 'your car is being towed' is trending!

#StupidShitPeopleThinkIsSmart #FAIL

Re:Yea... Good Luck With That. (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about a year ago | (#46134767)

#StupidShitPeopleThinkIsSmart #FAIL

Indeed. Classic case of treating the symptom rather than the cause.

Re:Yea... Good Luck With That. (2)

davester666 (731373) | about a year ago | (#46134861)

now it will be a competition. get a picture of your car posted, parked in the most outrageous position possible.

Privacy Risks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134131)

Basically, they've asked residents to post photos of bad parking jobs to Twitter.

Why not just use the non-emergency number that most police agencies have to report a parking infraction? This just puts millions of license plates at risk of being put online for the purpose of reporting a person's supposedly bad parking.

Better education, less regulation and all that...

Re:Privacy Risks (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134171)

Since when is a license plate private? It's as public as the number on your house, and Google Street already put those online.

Re:Privacy Risks (1)

ganjadude (952775) | about a year ago | (#46134465)

i dont know if its law or not in america, but more often than not you will see the plate blured out for privacy reasons on TV shows for instance

Re:Privacy Risks (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134627)

America is litigation land, and they just don't want the hassle of any frivolous lawsuits.

Re:Privacy Risks (1)

Stan92057 (737634) | about a year ago | (#46135649)

Its the fantasy of innocent until proven guilty theory. Sounds nice but not very pratical lol

Re:Privacy Risks (4, Insightful)

megabeck42 (45659) | about a year ago | (#46134175)

At risk of being put online? Don't people risk exposing their license plates every time they back out of the garage?

I think the real concern is, "This just puts millions of illegally parking individuals at risk of being publicly shamed."

The best protection for any one concerned their license plate may end up online seems pretty simple and obvious: think ahead, be considerate, and don't park like an asshole.

Re:Privacy Risks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134201)

don't be an asshole.

I was born this way, you insensitive asshole!

Re:Privacy Risks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134469)

Have you tried... not being an asshole?

Re:Privacy Risks (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | about a year ago | (#46134649)

(one of) the other concerns is Police Work as Social Media Gamification.

It's like Ender's Game - They can turn it into some kind of dehumanized gamification contest, whereas until now people had a bit of slack leeway.

Re:Privacy Risks (4, Informative)

rollingcalf (605357) | about a year ago | (#46134205)

A picture is often more useful than a verbal complaint when the police are evaluating whether a given parking situation actually is a violation, and the exact location where it occurred.

And for citizens armed with a cellphone camera and Twitter, it's faster for them to post a pic than to sit on the non-emergency line for several minutes, first on hold for 5 minutes, then some more minutes to describe the vehicle and the location.

Re:Privacy Risks (3, Insightful)

CohibaVancouver (864662) | about a year ago | (#46134539)

Why not just use the non-emergency number that most police agencies have to report a parking infraction?

Because this provides photographic proof of the bad parking before they send out a meter maid.

This just puts millions of license plates at risk of being put online for the purpose of reporting a person's supposedly bad parking.

Never quite understood this whole 'privacy of license plates' thing. If I look out the window right now I can see a dozen+ license plates. If I went for a walk I'd see hundreds. How is it private if there are two of them on every car for everyone to see?

Re:Privacy Risks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134829)

Never quite understood this whole 'privacy of license plates' thing. If I look out the window right now I can see a dozen+ license plates. If I went for a walk I'd see hundreds. How is it private if there are two of them on every car for everyone to see?

It's not about making license plates more private, it's about limiting the places one can find instances of the plate. I wouldn't want someone to know that I was located somewhere at a certain time for whatever reason. What if I park somewhere and the guy that parks in the spot next to me does something stupid that warrants one of these images to be sent to the police department and my car happens to be visible in the picture?

I just dislike databases upon databases of our information that we can't control.

Re:Privacy Risks (1)

Nyder (754090) | about a year ago | (#46135599)

Never quite understood this whole 'privacy of license plates' thing. If I look out the window right now I can see a dozen+ license plates. If I went for a walk I'd see hundreds. How is it private if there are two of them on every car for everyone to see?

It's not about making license plates more private, it's about limiting the places one can find instances of the plate. I wouldn't want someone to know that I was located somewhere at a certain time for whatever reason. What if I park somewhere and the guy that parks in the spot next to me does something stupid that warrants one of these images to be sent to the police department and my car happens to be visible in the picture?

I just dislike databases upon databases of our information that we can't control.

The only way to solve your paranoia is to take public transportation. The chances that someone might take a picture that has your car in it is very good these days. Probably still slim it will happen, but since most everyone has a camera on their cell phone, yes, the chances are greater.

But lets be real. No one gives a fuck about you, no one cares where you are at, and if they did, they wouldn't need random strangers to post pics of your car online, they'd just have someone following you.

Re:Privacy Risks (2)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about a year ago | (#46134981)

Never quite understood this whole 'privacy of license plates' thing. If I look out the window right now I can see a dozen+ license plates. If I went for a walk I'd see hundreds. How is it private if there are two of them on every car for everyone to see?

The word privacy has multiple definitions. In this case, the apropriate definition is ephemeral. You looking at a license plate informs one person, you, about the time and location of that plate. You posting a picture of that online creates a perment record that potentially millions of people can access.

It is the same thing as using a debit card and the clerk looking at the card number versus the POS computer making a permanent record of the card number. The first is a very small risk, the second is essentially an unbounded risk as customers of Target, Neiman-Marcus and Michaels have come to find out.

Re:Privacy Risks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46135613)

it is kind of different from purchasing records at a store, as the store itself has incentive to not just post people's credit card numbers online, as it could impact their sales. Additionally, it is a lot harder to get a person's credit card number normally, as you either have to be watching really close when they use it, physically get a hold of it without the person knowing, or hope that the store screws up their security.

A license plate number on the other hand can be written down by anyone with little to no effort. If you had time to waste, nothing is stopping you from keeping a record of all the license plates that go past a particular street, or into a particular parking lot. It is a lot harder to do that with credit card numbers, but there is also more damage you can do with the credit card number than a license plate number in general. There are examples of people recording license plates and images of the person visiting places like pornography stores or abortion clinics, and posting those things online. At some point you have to accept that by going outside, you will be seen, and you don't have any control over how and what form of memory that will end up.

nada says (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134139)

mama don't like tattletales

Re:nada says (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134381)

mama don't like disrespectful assholes who think they don't have to follow the rules.

Re:nada says (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134565)

Nada had two things to say about following the rules:
"I follow the rules. Everybody's got their own hard times these days."
Later on he just said, "Fuck it."

Town planning - lack of. (5, Insightful)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#46134157)

What irks me is the lack of town planning for cars in European cities then the incompetent authorities act like it is all the citizens fault. I get that they have ancient medieval town centers that are almost impossible to modify - but that is no excuse for not providing adequate amounts of free to almost free just out-of-town parking and efficient cheap public transport into the centers (efficient does not mean it has to be profitable in the direct sense).

Singapore for example with so little space has pioneered high rise cheap parking for all out in the suburbs and electronic pay to enter town centers that really increased the quality of life in the inner city, or so I hear.

Don't get me started on the last century traffic lights on timers and no trigger sensors of any kind in sight even at the pedestrian crossings. Christmas lights I like to call them. The amount of petrol they must waste stopping scores of cars for no reason must be mind-boggling.

/rant off.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134183)

Quality of life and a "socialist" public transport system are not in vogue in "Austerity for no good reason" [ragingbullshit.com] Europe.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134255)

You do realize that this has been a problem for at least 20 if not 30+ years. The Italian government is a best incompetent......

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134319)

The Italian government is a best incompetent......

It could be worse. At least they don't make the trains run on time anymore.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134215)

London copied Singapore's electronic pay as you enter "congestion charge" town centers. It is more or less a positive outcome [streetsblog.org] but it could be improved.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134221)

Congestion pricing [wikipedia.org] . From the other link: "As for London, ten years on, no one is proposing scrapping or diluting the congestion charge. Motorists pay to drive in that city’s congested center, the sky hasn’t fallen, and life on the ground is demonstrably safer, healthier, and better."

Re:Town planning - lack of. (-1)

0123456 (636235) | about a year ago | (#46134871)

Yeah, it's a great idea. First the government screw up the cities so there's congestion, then they get to charge everyone who enters because it's 'congested'.

Clearly they have no vested interest in creating congestion so they can rake in more tax. Why, the very idea would never even have considered crossing their mind.

As for London being healthier, don't make me laugh. Most of the air pollution comes from diesel vehicles, and those are precisely the ones (e.g. taxis, buses and lorries) which continue to drive in the city. If there's been any reduction, it's due to better engines, not 'we made congestion' tax.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (3, Insightful)

Captain Splendid (673276) | about a year ago | (#46135101)

First the government screw up the cities

Well, seeing as this is London, and was "planned" over hundreds of years, I don't think that criticism works as well as you think.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (1)

HiThere (15173) | about a year ago | (#46135029)

Did you notice that "congestion pricing" was only a part of the solution. Another part was providing places to park away from the center, with good transit connections to good transit. There are other parts to making it a good solution, which basicly come under the ruberic of "pedestrian amenities", though you could include bicycles, too. Do note, however, that bicycle amenities are often very different from pedestrian amenities.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134327)

That's because most town planning like this is run by civil engineers. And not just any civil engineer... civil engineers that couldn't find jobs in the private sector and work for the government. The gutter trash of the engineering world.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134333)

Indeed! Ask any city level civil engineer if they've read Christopher Alexander or even heard of him.... usually you'll get a confused look in response.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (5, Insightful)

Sique (173459) | about a year ago | (#46134357)

What irks me is the lack of town planning for cars in European cities then the incompetent authorities act like it is all the citizens fault.

First, those towns were planned when there were no cars at all. Second, some towns tried to restructure itself into a more car friendly town, and the result was a less human friendly town. For some reasons, the most searched for towns are those with a horrible parking situation. So blame who you want, towns with a not adequate parking situation fare better in general, because they seem to get the general idea how to operate a town, and one aspect seems to not concentrate on cars too much.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0, Flamebait)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#46134397)

You did not read past the first sentence of my post, obviously. Here is the second sentence for your convenience: "I get that they have ancient medieval town centers that are almost impossible to modify - but that is no excuse for not providing adequate amounts of free to almost free just out-of-town parking and efficient cheap public transport into the centers.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (1, Insightful)

Richard_at_work (517087) | about a year ago | (#46134431)

But the issue with Rome is the people that live there and the cars they drive - I highly doubt they would be interested in out of town park and rides.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134771)

But the issue with Rome is the people that live there

So very true of every city.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (1)

HiThere (15173) | about a year ago | (#46135049)

If there were good public transit, and secure long-term storage places (wherre, e.g., the battery could be kept charged) then they might be interested. Particularly if sensible parking regulations were enforced. This, however, looks like putting enforcement before the alternative. OTOH, it's a Slashdot summary, so who knows what's really going on.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (1)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#46135237)

I highly doubt they would be interested in out of town park and rides.

When there is no longer the option of "creative parking" - then all that is left would be interest in parking somewhere convenient. Living in European cities I have had to park suburbs away from the apartment, and even then it was a hit and miss affair due to lack of town planning.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (4, Informative)

cheesybagel (670288) | about a year ago | (#46134869)

You keep thinking like this is the US where literally no one lives in the center which is composed of office spaces. This is not the case in European cities. Many people live in the center and quite often their building has no parking space at all. Because it was built in the XIXth century or whatever when people did not need such things. And the streets are often narrow because horses needed less space to move around.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (3, Interesting)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#46135145)

No I have lived in the center of my fare share of European cities. All your points are correct and also the reason why you can't park there. My point is: Not only is there nowhere to park in the center, there is nowhere to park out of the center, either. i.e. lack of town planning.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (2)

Trepidity (597) | about a year ago | (#46135463)

One solution, which Copenhagen has adopted, is to reduce how necessary it is to park anywhere at all. If you live in the center, of course you have no need for a car: you can bike, bus, walk, or metro anywhere you need to go. If you live out of the center, you also have no need for a car, because you can bike, bus, or walk to the nearest S-train stop, which by design [wikipedia.org] will not be far away, and take that right into the city.

As a result of that, plus high taxes on car ownership to further disincentivize it, Copenhagen has 20 cars per 100 residents, less than 1/3 the ratio that Rome suffers.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (4, Insightful)

godrik (1287354) | about a year ago | (#46134391)

Whie I entirely aggree with you that the main problem comes from the city lacking the proper parking spaces, that makes it no excuse to park like a complete douche.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134441)

Actuelly, you can blame people for buying a car (or two) when they don't have anywhere to put it. Authorities can do the planning, or they can leave it to private initiative. I.e. you buy land for a garage, then buy a car.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (5, Interesting)

jwdb (526327) | about a year ago | (#46134467)

What irks me is the lack of town planning for cars in European cities then the incompetent authorities act like it is all the citizens fault. I get that they have ancient medieval town centers that are almost impossible to modify - but that is no excuse for not providing adequate amounts of free to almost free just out-of-town parking and efficient cheap public transport into the centers (efficient does not mean it has to be profitable in the direct sense).

You're not looking hard enough. Most of the major cities I've driven to in the EU (Belgium and the Netherlands, primarily, over five years) had significant parking on the outskirts of town (never free, land costs money) near the end of the city metro lines. Drop the car there, take the tram, and enjoy a city built at a human scale. Or even better, take the train right into downtown.

I've moved back to the US recently, and I dearly miss those compact cities. I'm in a small city in Georgia now and it's disgusting how much prime downtown space is wasted on empty parking lots. I'd much rather have no parking at all rather than too much, as then you can at least walk or bike.

Don't get me started on the last century traffic lights on timers and no trigger sensors of any kind in sight even at the pedestrian crossings.

Traffic lights is a different matter, and apparently depends on your driving style. I never had a problem flowing through light after light back home, but here I'm constantly being stopped. I'm sure I'll eventually get used to the timing here, as you would over there.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134657)

Traffic lights is a different matter, and apparently depends on your driving style. I never had a problem flowing through light after light back home, but here I'm constantly being stopped. I'm sure I'll eventually get used to the timing here, as you would over there.

Triggered lights done right should still allow flow along the major route short of some messed up traffic pattern situations. You still have the lights timed to allow flow, just don't change if there is not some one actually there, or have the option for a shorter change if there are not many people there. I've seen bad designed traffic signals in about every country and US state I've traveled too, but I've also seen plenty of well designed ones. It isn't about getting used to one style or another, but about some amount of luck that went into whoever constructed the system and if the municipality ever bothers to do studies and improvements to places after they have been constructed.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (2)

HiThere (15173) | about a year ago | (#46135083)

??? If you don't have the lights timed, then you can't design to allow flow. It just doesn't work. Even with timed lights it's quite difficult to have good flow in two different directions. (You *can* do it if you'ver very careful about the timing...or if you allow the flow to be broken around every 10 blocks...and only have about one street out of 10 timed for flow.) Note that even so if you want flow in two orthogonal directions, you may need to be very careful with the speeds that you allow to flow.

But you can't allow lights to change at other than the specified times. I suppose you could decide to skip an entire cycle, but that usually wouldn't speed up the traffic flow. Somewhere along the route someone would be on a cross street, and their light would change...which would mean that the street that they crossed would change out of sequence with the other lights, and .... it's just a bad idea.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46135653)

I suppose you could decide to skip an entire cycle, but that usually wouldn't speed up the traffic flow.

Looks like the very post you replied to beat you to it:

You still have the lights timed to allow flow, just don't change if there is not some one actually there, or have the option for a shorter change if there are not many people there.

And if both directions at an intersection are major enough such that any break from the pattern causes backed up traffic, then it doesn't need to be triggered because then it is a major intersection that always has traffic waiting for either direction.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (1)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#46135193)

Your right I painted with a broad brush by saying "European cities". All the ones I have lived in (Italy, Spain, France...) but not including Belgium or the Netherlands have the problem I describe. Not all in Italy are so bad either, I hear Milan at least have some inner city congestion control and planning than most.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (2, Insightful)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | about a year ago | (#46134541)

You do realize that most European cities existed for hundreds or even thousands of years before cars were invented?

Re:Town planning - lack of. (2)

FriendlyLurker (50431) | about a year ago | (#46135201)

Yes, I know. Read my second sentence.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134731)

I get that they have ancient medieval town centers that are almost impossible to modify

Just FYI, Rome isn't medieval. The middle ages started around the fifth century. The city of Rome was over a thousand years old at that point.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (1)

cheesybagel (670288) | about a year ago | (#46134891)

Yeah and even back then Nero wanted to burn it down and rebuild it because he thought the city design was too old.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46135241)

It must have been medieval at some point or it wouldn't still be around.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (2)

ciotog (1098035) | about a year ago | (#46134769)

Don't get me started on the last century traffic lights on timers and no trigger sensors of any kind in sight even at the pedestrian crossings. Christmas lights I like to call them. The amount of petrol they must waste stopping scores of cars for no reason must be mind-boggling.

If they make driving too convenient, then people will drive more often and farther away, which would consume even more petrol than idling at a traffic light occasionally.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (1)

0123456 (636235) | about a year ago | (#46134895)

Last time I drove in London, I took about an hour to cover one mile. Solely because, when my light went green, the light ahead was still red, so there was only space for one or two cars to move forward during the green part of the cycle. As soon as we got past the last traffic light and onto the main road, we were doing 40mph within seconds.

Fortunately, 'congestion charging' will clearly solve that.

Re:Town planning - lack of. (1)

Barsteward (969998) | about a year ago | (#46135265)

The traffic lights in London can be controlled centrally for 24/7. If there is a problem somewhere they can change timings on lights etc. watch this if you can get access to it from where you are.. http://www.bbc.co.uk/britainfr... [bbc.co.uk] or read this http://www.london.gov.uk/prior... [london.gov.uk]

Busy, Busy World (1, Funny)

retroworks (652802) | about a year ago | (#46134167)

So when I park my Fiat in a parking fountain, should I send a dozen tweets sending the cops to the opposite side of the city? "The solution is dilution".

Re:Busy, Busy World (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134293)

should I send a dozen tweets sending the cops to the opposite side of the city?

Yes don't worry for your car, the folks from opposite corners of the city will take care of sending its pics.

Staggering 70 per 100 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134177)

Indianapolis has a staggering ratio of probably 150 cars per 100 residents.

Re:Staggering 70 per 100 (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about a year ago | (#46135205)

And your point? Its called freedom. Now, you can get back on the bus.

Number of citations (3, Interesting)

worf_mo (193770) | about a year ago | (#46134179)

To put those numbers into perspective: In 2011, 2.5 million traffic citations were filed in Rome, about 45% of those have been paid. In 2012 the number of citations dropped to 2.2 million of which 39% have been paid. (source [ilmessaggero.it] )

Re:Number of citations (1)

fph il quozientatore (971015) | about a year ago | (#46134743)

Now, a very good question for a non-Italian to ask would be "why on hell do more than half of the tickets go unpaid?"

I've got a fix for that (0)

pdwalker (113292) | about a year ago | (#46134219)

One word.

Photoshop.

Re:I've got a fix for that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134279)

Photoshop is not a concern. Cops don't issue tickets based on tweets. They respond. I.e. they go there and issue the ticket - if the car is still parked wrongly.

Re:I've got a fix for that (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134281)

Have fun in traffic court. Guilty of being able to afford to pay the fine!

Failure (1)

jamesl (106902) | about a year ago | (#46134245)

2.7 million residents, 1.9 million private vehicles and they got about 30 complaints per day? In the world of social media, that's a pretty big failure.

Wrong ration (1)

mbone (558574) | about a year ago | (#46134271)

ancient city has a staggering ratio of 70 cars per 100 residents

I don't find that staggering. What I do find staggering is that the seems to be a ratio of about 70 cars per every parking space. Rome is a place where triple parking is pretty much routine.

Re:Wrong ration (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134345)

ancient city has a staggering ratio of 70 cars per 100 residents

I don't find that staggering. What I do find staggering is that the seems to be a ratio of about 70 cars per every parking space. Rome is a place where triple parking is pretty much routine.

Rome has enormous public transportation problems for 2 main reasons :

- one is that its surface public bus fleet is seriously small for a city that in extension is second to London.
- building a subway network is very difficult not for engineering problems but for historical problems. The Law makes it impossible to continue an engineering project should you end up coming into contact with ancient Roman ruins. And digging in Rome is a guarantee that you'll end up upon some ancient Roman ruins. So each time you want to build a garage, a new subway station it is a roll of dice. And when the works stops you can't destroy the ruins to continue the engineering project, you are not allow to move the ruins etc... So it all ends un in a standstill for years or decades to come. This is one aspect where fanatical respect for historical ruins is seriously harming any evolution of Rome as a city. Sometimes you need to let go of ancient things to build for the present. And that's not the case in Italy. The past takes precedence over the present. And so you end up in these absurd situations where Roman ruins end up having more "rights" than modern roman citizens do. With the consequence that living in Rome is hell. I can guarentee that no Roman likes living in Rome. Tourists yeah but they only stay 1-2 weeks. Day to day life in Rome is hell. Think Atlanta snow congested caos every single day of the year. It would drive crazy anybody.

Re:Wrong ration (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134407)

The obvious solution is to launch space habitats and never come back. Then the ancient Earth ruins can be left behind for posterity.

Captcha: mental. Thanks!

Re:Wrong ration (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134725)

So don't dig in Rome. Or dig so deep that you won't hit anything, make the subway network nothing but deep tunnels, and site the station access very very carefully.

Sorry, the history of world civilization IS more important than a new subway station in the present. The past NEEDS to take precedence over the present there. Don't like it? Move to someplace less historically significant.

Re:Wrong ration (2)

HiThere (15173) | about a year ago | (#46135155)

How do you get from those deep subway tunnels to the surface? Also, since Rome is fairly near sea level, and near the sea, those deep subway tunnels are also going to be underwater. This makes things much more expensive.

The solution in Roman times was, IIRC, to ban vehicles on the streets during daylight hours. I don't really think you need to ban bicycles, but Rome *is* the city on seven hills, so I doubt that bicycle use will be a popular as in flatter cities.

Perhaps an elevated railway could be made to work. You would need to design it with light vehicles, so that you would have considerable latitude as to where you placed the support pylons.

Re:Wrong ration (3, Insightful)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | about a year ago | (#46134551)

Rome existed for thousands of years before the car was invented. Sorry that they didn't think of savings space for car parks during the bronze age.

Re:Wrong ration (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134907)

It's been razed to the ground loads of times since then.

Re:Wrong ration (1)

Trepidity (597) | about a year ago | (#46135491)

The city center yes, but large parts of Rome are early-to-mid-20th-century monstrosities that suffer for the opposite reason: they were built with the expectation of people driving everywhere, and have poor transit or walkability. Big roads that endanger pedestrians and bicyclists, and encourage people to drive into the city rather than taking another option. The EUR area [wikipedia.org] is particularly bad.

Or, according to spooner... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134289)

Pome Rolice Use Bitter To Twattle Illegal Parking

It's EVERYWHERE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134303)

I see them on the sidewalks everywhere in Italy. And not just one. It's as if the sidewalk and cars were a jigsaw puzzle, and however a car can fit, it goes in. Thank god for twitter in Italy. If only twits where around when I was there: 1945. Or maybe later. I forget now.

Re:It's EVERYWHERE (0)

AuMatar (183847) | about a year ago | (#46134313)

Not just Italy- Greece, Turkey, Croatia, Austria, Hungary, Czech Republic. I can't vouch for anything west of Italy, but insane parking and driving is all over Europe to the east.

Re:It's EVERYWHERE (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134419)

I was thinking it sounded a lot like the last time I went to Michigan

Twitter needs to help the people not the cops (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134361)

And come to Tel Aviv. It's even more 3rd world here in regards to parking. Yet the cops are on top of it. But they wont touch luxury cars. Only average cars. How's that for a caste system /embarrassed

I'm Wondering (0)

crunchy_one (1047426) | about a year ago | (#46134365)

Did this program improve the parking situation in Rome? Doubt it. I'll go out on a limb and guess that it has yielding a tiny bit of revenue that disappears into the noise of what they already collect. But this is Rome, so why not a bit of tech circus for the masses?

Re: (1)

drgs (3521903) | about a year ago | (#46134495)

The future of politics will rely on this kind of "user-generated content", like wikipedia, only in real life and everywhere

Hahaha! Fining Italians? (0)

stevegee58 (1179505) | about a year ago | (#46134497)

Italy is notorious for its culture of tax evasion and insane driving.
In a country where almost no one pays their taxes (rendering it unenforceable) why pay fines too?

The solution is obvious (2)

xenobyte (446878) | about a year ago | (#46134505)

Just open up for private companies to tow illegally parked cars and make money (huge fees) from the towing and storage of the vehicles. With hundreds of such companies hunting for illegally parked cars and thus money, the streets will be clear in no time, and all the parking assholes will have learned an expensive lesson. To prevent abuse all towing must be documented using photos showing the parking offense, a copy of which are sent to the offender.

Re:The solution is obvious (1)

volmtech (769154) | about a year ago | (#46134661)

Guaranteed money maker. I had two children graduate from FSU in Tallahassee, Fl. My daughter also got her masters and PhD so I got to experience this four times. The ceremonies are held downtown. This is the state capital so lots of government buildings. On Saturdays the offices are closed but their parking lots are still for government employees only. You have to park a half a mile away and walk by hundreds of empty parking spaces. Paying a fine would be no problem for many but your vehicle is towed so few even try.

Re:The solution is obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134697)

Or you can accept that people need to park, and set up your laws so that any company doing this finds both their tow truck drivers and corporate officers in prison for car theft.

Seems like a more civilized solution to me.

Re:The solution is obvious (0)

drgs (3521903) | about a year ago | (#46134789)

In a country already known for corruption, they will tow all cars, parked legally or illegally

Government getting money != working (3, Insightful)

arvindsg (1757328) | about a year ago | (#46134559)

The new system, which was created by Raffaele Clemente, Rome's chief of traffic police, seems to be working.

I would argue if it were working then they wouldn't be getting many such tweets. Perfaps you forget aim is not to give more itations but fewer illegal parkings. All we can say is it might work.

crowd-sourcing of traffic enforcement (1)

mspring (126862) | about a year ago | (#46134699)

...is the future.
It's more just: No observers of an infraction, no problem, regardless of the letter of the law.
I'd just add a reputation based moderation system to supress malice.

And Italy has never had a history of... (-1)

anlprb (130123) | about a year ago | (#46134705)

Snitches. Hahaha. I wonder who vists @TrafficNaRcAntony when someone, umm, _Influential_ gets a parking ticket for a tweet sent by someone obviously standing in front of the "questionably" parked car long enough to send a good, focused picture.

We all know where snitches end up...

On a side note, wow, gotta love socialism. The state is more important than the individual to the point that the state out-sources their enforcement to the citizens. And the citizens do it! Gotta love the collectivism mindset. Tattle to mother government when they see something wrong, then codify the process through twitter.

Re:And Italy has never had a history of... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46134867)

First of all, I don't think Italy have anyone seeking asylum in Russia at the moment, to avoid "enhanced interrogation" and potentially the death penalty. So much for the scary socialist state, eh?

Secondly, the point of law enforcement is to enforce the law. If citizens are informing the law enforcement officers when the law is broken, what makes that inherently socialist? Do you come from one of those neighborhoods where you don't talk to the "pigs" because they represent "the man"?

Re:And Italy has never had a history of... (1)

anlprb (130123) | about a year ago | (#46134979)

I think you just proved my point with Snowden. Governments have too much control over people as it is; we don't need to give them more. I think we agree on that. Governments only have control when we want them to. My ancestors and state fought long and hard to throw off an oppressive government and take up the mantle of sovereignty ourselves.

I come from a neighborhood where people mind their own business, because it is their own. I like my privacy and to be left alone. My neighbors like the same thing. We all agree on that. I don't stick my nose in someone else's affairs because I don't want them sticking their nose in mine.

Tattling to the police is like running and crying to Mom. The last bastion of those who can't handle that other people do things they don't like and want to punish them with the highest power they can.

Just because you don't like stereotypes doesn't mean they aren't true and the little old Italian wash woman sticking her nose in other people's business is very well known around me. Italians, on a whole, like to butt into other people's business. It is their entertainment. I know, I have four, off the boat, still Italian citizen, resident aliens in my family. They are great people, but they love gossip and getting into other people's affairs.

Re:And Italy has never had a history of... (2)

radish (98371) | about a year ago | (#46135243)

So wait - you think reporting a crime to the police so they can investigate it is "tattling"? What are you? 8 years old?

You see some thugs mugging an old woman - move along, none of your business. You see someone breaking into your neighbor's house - leave it alone, I'm sure they value their privacy.

I simply can't understand the mentality that says if you see someone doing something wrong you just let them carry on. Baffling.

Re:And Italy has never had a history of... (0)

anlprb (130123) | about a year ago | (#46135303)

HAHAHA. You don't understand the difference between statutory regulations and criminal law. Go look up the difference between the two and come back and have an informed discussion. What are you 7 years old? -- insults are not necessary. Just become informed of how law works and then we can talk. Here is a hint. Who is the plaintiff in both, what is the burden of proof in both. Who is the injured party in both? How and why? Who brings action against the accused? I never said that when someone is being mugged, you should look away. This is about statutory infractions, not about crime. Understand the difference and we can talk.

Re:And Italy has never had a history of... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46135819)

Tattling to the police is like running and crying to Mom.

So some douchebag parks your car in, locks up and goes to the opera. No big deal, right? Don't go crying to mama ... be a man! Break a window and push the car down the hill. Works great until someone unilaterally decides you're the douchbag.

Re:And Italy has never had a history of... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46135343)

They just made it more convenient for people to report cars that violate traffic laws and presumably annoy them.

shees.

mussolini's opinion (0)

ceCA (675081) | about a year ago | (#46134845)

“It is not impossible to govern Italians, merely useless.” -Mussolini Italy is a fuckn zoo

That worked well in nazi germany (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about a year ago | (#46135183)

Where nearly everyone spied on everyone else. You never knew who was watching and reporting, so you assumed everyone was.

Photoshop (0)

nurb432 (527695) | about a year ago | (#46135189)

For the the modern joe-job.

Unless its an actual officer with an issued camera, the picture means nothing.

1984 all over again (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46135289)

Am I the only one chilled by the rising use of technology combined with citizens to create a self-police state? What next? Jay walking? Dogs with no leash? Spitting in public?

Will we not be satisfied until everyone has a camera, and they're pointed at everyone else, and every single infraction we all do daily is continually reported until we are all in jail? That's where it ends up, in my purposely exaggerated to prove a point scenario.

And sorry for posting as AC, but you know...tin foil hat and all that.

The Good Ol days (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year ago | (#46135695)

Oh I love this story because it reminds me of growing up in Germany in the good 'ol days. Every morning my friend Klaus and I would put on our nicely pressed brwon shirts ( danke mutter!) and go out and report crimes for heir Hitler. Oh we would turn in our friends, neighbors, even our relatives if we had to. Man what we couldn't have accomplished if we could have just done our enforcement via Twitter.

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