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NPR Labs is Working on Emergency Alerts for the Deaf (Video)

Roblimo posted about 6 months ago | from the extending-emergency-broadcasts-to-people-who-can't-hear-them dept.

Communications 89

When we think about NPR (National Public Radio) most of us think of A Prairie Home Companion or another favorite radio show. But NPR also has a research component, NPR Labs, that they say "is the nation's only not-for-profit broadcast technology research and development center." The video (below) is an interview with NPR person Maryfran Tyler about their pilot program designed "to demonstrate the delivery of emergency alerts to people who are deaf or hard-of-hearing in the Gulf Coast states through local public radio stations and the Public Radio Satellite System (PRSS®)." NPR also says, "This is the first effort to deliver real-time accessibility-targeted emergency messages, such as weather alerts, via radio broadcast texts."

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Eh? (-1, Troll)

TechyImmigrant (175943) | about 6 months ago | (#46144777)

Pardon?

Re:Eh? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46144857)

Let me get my translator for the hearing impaired, Garret Morris:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=butZyxI-PRs

Re:Eh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145173)

goddamnit, a video without a transcript link?!!
What about those of us where it's higher bandwith to read a story rather that watch some damn idiot blather on about it?
And why are DEAF people listening(?) to National Public RADIO ?!!!

seizures (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46144805)

Does it cause seizures? It should cause seizures.

Prairie home companion. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46144809)

Maybe it's meant for the over-70 set, but I just don't get it. In fact I hate NPR weekend programming.

And I don't hate NPR - I love their general weekday programming, science friday, market talk, Dianne Rehm, Tell me more (though that show seems...odd now), etc.. It's just that I don't understand how anyone under 70 can listen to PHC and not want to drive into oncoming traffic.

Re:Prairie home companion. (2)

jandrese (485) | about 6 months ago | (#46144853)

I can understand how you might not like Garrison Keillor, he has a very Midwestern sensibility that doesn't try to appeal to everybody. It's harder for me to understand how you can hate Wait Wait Don't Tell Me though. That show is a gem.

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

wile_e_wonka (934864) | about 6 months ago | (#46144985)

Wait Wait Don't Tell me is absolutely in the same terrible category as Prairie Home Companion. But This American Life, Radiolab, CarTalk, Planet Money, Marketplace, SciFri, The Moth, Backstory, etc... are excellent. They've got a ton of excellent stuff on NPR.

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

fiannaFailMan (702447) | about 6 months ago | (#46145119)

Car Talk? Are you f***ing kidding me?! Two assholes with abrasive Boston accents sit there laughing like hyenas at everything the other one says? How anyone listens to that garbage I do not know. Every time it's about to come on I have to dive for the radio and switch it off because I can't even stand the sound of "Suppoht foh cah tawk ..." intro, to say nothing of the fingernails-on-a-blackboard country music that follows.

Click: "You know what?"

Clack: "What?"

Click: "I got up early this mohning! Hwahwahwaaaa!"

Clack: "Hwahwahwa! Really?!"

Click: "Yeah! Hwa hwa hwa!!!"

Click and Clack in unison: "Hwa hwa hwa!"

Makes me want to punt the radio into next week.

RadioLab's okay, but the annoying editing is just...uh oh, here it comes ... annoying, like when you're tuning into what someone's saying and his voice starts fading out yadda yadda yadda ... narrator cuts in across the front of him to comment on who he is or what he's talking about. It'd be much easier to listen to without the gimmicky editing.

This American Life is okay, but I find Ira Glass' creaky voice a little hard to listen to sometimes. Sounds like he's constantly nervous.

As for the local announcers here on KQED, some are better than others. There's one guy who shall remain nameless who I have yet to hear complete a sentence without stumbling over himself, and there's a female announcer who's not much better. People like that wouldn't last long on the BBC. Maybe they're dyslexic or something and have a hard time reading what's in front of them, and I have nothing but sympathy, but they shouldn't be on the air.

But in general I find the quality of NPR's production values a lot higher than PBS. I guess it's a lot easier to do a good job on radio than on TV, so you don't need the BBC's massive budget to nail it.

Re:Prairie home companion. (2, Informative)

geekoid (135745) | about 6 months ago | (#46145167)

Many people like Car Talk, about 1.4% of the US listen to them.
Would it kill you not to be an ass? I mean, it's fine you don't like them, but man you sound like an asshole. Frankly, the Internet has enough of those already.

Re:Prairie home companion. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145549)

Would it kill you not to be an ass? I mean, it's fine you don't like them, but man you sound like an asshole. Frankly, the Internet has enough of those already.

Most of us prefer assholes like the guy you are attempting to censor, because
often assholes will have something interesting to offer to a conversation, whereas
idiots like you just say stupid obnoxious things which are utterly worthless in
the context of a meaningful discussion.

Have you considered suicide ? It could very well be the most useful thing
you ever do with your life, you silly little bag of shit.

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | about 6 months ago | (#46145801)

> because often assholes will have something interesting to offer to a conversation

Yes, his complaints about the voices of the various hosts was fascinating and illuminating. Really opened my eyes to the situation.

Re:Prairie home companion. (0)

fiannaFailMan (702447) | about 6 months ago | (#46145981)

Many people like Car Talk, about 1.4% of the US listen to them.
Would it kill you not to be an ass? I mean, it's fine you don't like them, but man you sound like an asshole. Frankly, the Internet has enough of those already.

Thank you for that little pearl of wisdom. Nothing like a bit of blatant ad hominem, with no attempt whatsoever to deal with the point, to break up the day.

Anything else you'd like to say about the completely irrelevant topic of your perception of my personality, you amusingly stupid mucksavage?

Re:Prairie home companion. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46152863)

mucksavage

What the fuck is a mucksavage?

Re:Prairie home companion. (0)

TWX (665546) | about 6 months ago | (#46145325)

Car Talk? Are you f***ing kidding me?! Two assholes with abrasive Boston accents sit there laughing like hyenas at everything the other one says? How anyone listens to that garbage I do not know. Every time it's about to come on I have to dive for the radio and switch it off because I can't even stand the sound of "Suppoht foh cah tawk ..." intro, to say nothing of the fingernails-on-a-blackboard country music that follows.

Click: "You know what?"

Clack: "What?"

Click: "I got up early this mohning! Hwahwahwaaaa!"

Clack: "Hwahwahwa! Really?!"

Click: "Yeah! Hwa hwa hwa!!!"

Click and Clack in unison: "Hwa hwa hwa!"

Makes me want to punt the radio into next week.

RadioLab's okay, but the annoying editing is just...uh oh, here it comes ... annoying, like when you're tuning into what someone's saying and his voice starts fading out yadda yadda yadda ... narrator cuts in across the front of him to comment on who he is or what he's talking about. It'd be much easier to listen to without the gimmicky editing.

This American Life is okay, but I find Ira Glass' creaky voice a little hard to listen to sometimes. Sounds like he's constantly nervous.

As for the local announcers here on KQED, some are better than others. There's one guy who shall remain nameless who I have yet to hear complete a sentence without stumbling over himself, and there's a female announcer who's not much better. People like that wouldn't last long on the BBC. Maybe they're dyslexic or something and have a hard time reading what's in front of them, and I have nothing but sympathy, but they shouldn't be on the air.

But in general I find the quality of NPR's production values a lot higher than PBS. I guess it's a lot easier to do a good job on radio than on TV, so you don't need the BBC's massive budget to nail it.

Garrison Keillor, get to the f'ing point! This ain't Lake Woebegon!

You will soon recieve a stern letter (1)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | about 6 months ago | (#46145671)

from the law offices of Dewey, Cheatem & Howe.

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

necro81 (917438) | about 6 months ago | (#46146621)

This American Life ... is okay, but ... I find Ira Glass' creaky voice ... a little hard to listen to sometimes. Sounds like ... he's constantly nervous.

Fixed that for you. I believe they call it the Woody Allen school of acting.

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

slick7 (1703596) | about 6 months ago | (#46146523)

Wait Wait Don't Tell me is absolutely in the same terrible category as Prairie Home Companion. But This American Life, Radiolab, CarTalk, Planet Money, Marketplace, SciFri, The Moth, Backstory, etc... are excellent. They've got a ton of excellent stuff on NPR.

Please stop, I'm bored.

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 6 months ago | (#46150287)

There is a good subset of NPR listeners who seem to dislike anything that is suppose to be entertaining. They are often political junkies, who are under the impression that politics is very important, and their political opponents must be absolutely evil, or stupid. They complain when ever NPR brings up anything slightly entertaining or presented in a funny way. With perhaps Harry Shearer as the exception because his humor is about pointing out the flaws of his political opponents who he portraits as absolutely evil or stupid.

I personally don't like Harry Shearer because other then the random music which is clever, his stuff is monotonous.
Nuclear Power - Bad
Olympics - Bad
Catholics - Bad
News Corp - Bad
The Army Core of Engineers - Really Really Really BAD!
Lets poke some fun of bad grammar from some people adhoc interviews.
And if someone of influence gets in trouble lets get their apology, and make it seem insincere.

However I am under the notion that information can be educational and entertaining at the same time. Wait Wait Don't Tell Me, is fairly good at that. It can poke fun at stuff without being all negative and mean about it. Prairie Home Companion, is mostly just for entertainment, and doesn't mean to hurt people.

The Political Junkies, think in order to be intelligent you need to be negative about it. So shows that don't do that, they get angry at and claim that it is too soft for them.
   

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 6 months ago | (#46145051)

PHC always makes me thing of this quote:
"You've got to remember that these are just simple farmers. These are people of the land. The common clay of the new West. You know... morons." Jim - Blazing Saddles

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

hey! (33014) | about 6 months ago | (#46145065)

Speaking of which, I went to a concert by a Grammy award winning concert pianist playing works Beethoven, Schubert, Griffes and Chopin. The average age was, no exaggeration, well north of 70. I think I was the only person there under 60, except for one ten year-old boy there with his grandma.

This suggests an explanation for why us old folks think Prairie Home Companion is a hoot, but *you* don't get it. We're smarter than you.

Don't feel bad, though; think of growing sophistication as something you can look forward to.

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

betterprimate (2679747) | about 6 months ago | (#46145611)

I enjoy Beethoven and Chopin (not Schubert and Griffes), but I cringe when I listen to Prairie Home Companion. Prairie Home Companion relies heavily upon a broad nostalgia in its storytelling. Younger generations won't have the same appreciation for it.

Re:Prairie home companion. (2)

Roblimo (357) | about 6 months ago | (#46146003)

My first wife was a Minnesota farmgirl who said, "Prairie Home Companion? If I wanted to hear people like that I would have stayed on the farm instead of leaving."

Re:Prairie home companion. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145637)

This suggests an explanation for why us old folks think Prairie Home Companion is a hoot, but *you* don't get it. We're smarter than you.

Prarie Home Companion has a "schtick" which is extremely repetitive and while it was amusing
for a while, it is just the same old thing over and over and that gets old. If you think that your enjoyment of
the same old shit over and over means you are somehow superior, you have an interesting
method of determining superiority which is unlikely to meet with acceptance by any member of the
academic community.

So why don't you just cut the bullshit and say you are a smug holier than thou prick. At least you could get points
for honesty saying that.

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

hondo77 (324058) | about 6 months ago | (#46145651)

Speaking of which, I went to a concert by a Grammy award winning concert pianist... We're smarter than you.

I also has been at concerts by Grammy [wikipedia.org] Award [wikipedia.org] -winning [wikipedia.org] artists [wikipedia.org] so I must be teh smarterer, too.

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

billstewart (78916) | about 6 months ago | (#46146559)

I'm under 60, and I've been listening to PHC for almost 30 years. And yeah, it's not for everybody, and it takes some attention span and some familiarity with the culture that it's coming from. I'm originally an Easterner, and my family was from the Midwest rather than the North Central area, and none of them were still farmers by the time I was around.

The church I went to in Berkeley in the 70s was about half grad students and about half old-time Swedish immigrant families; Pastor Anderson was from Minnesota, and his accent was about like a typical Lake Wobegone resident, and the potluck dinners would have lots of baked goods and casseroles and the occasional lutefisk. They weren't Lutherans, but you could recognize a lot of Keillor's memes, though of course these were the folks who, after moving South from Sweden to Minnesota, decided that that was enough of that moved somewhere warm.

Maybe it's meant for the over-70 set (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145081)

The people that still remember when APHC had Chet Atkins and Peter Ostroushko on and it was edgy and funny instead of just ironic.

Re:Prairie home companion. (1)

Cornwallis (1188489) | about 6 months ago | (#46145667)

Prairie Home Companion comes from American Public Media, not NPR.

Re:Prairie home companion. (3, Funny)

Ksevio (865461) | about 6 months ago | (#46145681)

It's just that I don't understand how anyone under 70 can listen to PHC and not want to drive into oncoming traffic.

It sounds like you aren't getting enough Catchup. Catchup contains natural mellowing agents that keep you from making irrational driving decisions and enjoy the small things in life.

Panic Sign (1)

sycodon (149926) | about 6 months ago | (#46144829)

Does it look like this? [youtube.com]

FEMA (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46144843)

Obama does not care about deaf people.

SHORE PLAYZ A MEAN PINBALL !! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46144855)

Tommy can you hear me !!
Tommy ??
Tommy ??

And then it gets defunded (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46144859)

Sweet! Now the Republicans have another thing about NPR at they can point and derp on about how much precious, taxpayer-funded taxpayer money from job creators is being "wasted"! Sounds like another week worth of material for the Daily Show and another eight or so years of talking points for slack-jawed yokels to parrot!

Re:And then it gets defunded (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145195)

Sweet, now you assholes have something to act like a bigoted bitch about. Now you won't have to think and see people as people instead of political parties.

Re:And then it gets defunded (0, Flamebait)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about 6 months ago | (#46145199)

Actually, I'm not sure how successful this kind of thing really is.

How about an Obama Phone and using TXT messaging for the deaf? Or a Smart Phone. Or, we could develop a TXT only device for EBS.

There are a dozen other ways, off the top of my head, that they could accomplish the goals without spending a dime of tax payer money to solve the problem. ALL cheaper than whatever they are spending on re-inventing the wheel.

Only Democrats look at a problem and think it is a problem that Tax dollars need to solve, when there are already very good, or even marginal alternatives available. Because that is the first AND ONLY thought a stupid liberal has "Government needs to fund this, because otherwise it won't happen, and it makes us feel all warm and fuzzy inside when we spend other peoples money on things only we see as problems."

Re:And then it gets defunded (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about 6 months ago | (#46145623)

Because SMS texts and email don't have guarantees for delivery time. We get used to fast network speeds, but I've still occasionally gotten texts and emails a day or more after they were sent.

Re:And then it gets defunded (2)

sjames (1099) | about 6 months ago | (#46145989)

Probably because the cell networks fall over the instant an emergency comes up so they want something a bit more professionally maintained with better range like a radio station to relay the signal.

It's probably fairly cheap compared to getting the telcos to cooperate.

Re:And then it gets defunded (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46155921)

Especially in Gulf states, where a hurricane can knock over all of the telecom's pretty little infrastructure while everyone's sheltered in place and no one can run out to fix it, but the radio towers stay up.

Re:And then it gets defunded (1)

icebike (68054) | about 6 months ago | (#46145469)

precious, taxpayer-funded taxpayer money from job creators is being "wasted"!

Radio research for the Deaf is pretty much the poster child of wasted money. Sort of like braille highway signs for blind drivers.

Nearly all deaf [americanownews.com] people carry smartphones. The ones that don't, certainly don't carry radios, or any other device capable of receiving radio texts.

There are scads of Apps in the Google market for the deaf. Most free. Deaf people can negotiate plans [att.com] with zero minutes [verizonwireless.com] from almost all the carriers.

NPR is looking at every problem as if it were a nail, because the only tool they have is a hammer.
So, yeah. Pretty much a waste of money.

Re:And then it gets defunded (1)

ScottCooperDotNet (929575) | about 6 months ago | (#46145927)

If NPR sounded less like MSNBC, I doubt the Republicans would bother with their pittance of the federal budget. NPR is so left wing that commercial talk radio is almost exclusively right wing.

In any case, this program doesn't sound as likely to produce future advances as the space program could.

Re:And then it gets defunded (1)

Goody (23843) | about 6 months ago | (#46146043)

The only reason it often sounds left wing to non-listeners is because conservative media won't spend 20 minutes exhaustively covering a subject like a frog species in South America or the history of the AK-47 (and not once mention school shootings or gun control). To compare it to MSNBC is laughable. MSNBC is just an inept left wing copy of Fox News. You clearly haven't listened to NPR to any extent if you think it sounds like MSNBC.

Conservative Media Coverage (2)

billstewart (78916) | about 6 months ago | (#46146471)

Oh, Right-WIng Media will happily spend 20 minutes of in-depth coverage on the Left's War On Christmas, or how clean Clean Coal is.

I did once fill out a survey on "where do you get your news" - I checked the "Conservative talk radio" box, and filled in the "Station" box with KQED, which is my local public radio station. It's Establishment Media, which is conservative, as opposed to crazy right-wing media.

NPR is Establishment Media, not left-wing at all (1)

billstewart (78916) | about 6 months ago | (#46146427)

If I want to listen to left-wing media, I'll turn to KPFA (here in the San Francisco area, or other Pacifica stations elsewhere, like WBAI in NYC or KPFK in LA), for a mixture of news, culture, interesting music, etc.

NPR isn't left-wing at all. It's Establishment Media, putting out the government's news as well as cultural programming. Think about any time they've talked about the war - how long was it before you heard anybody on public radio use the term "torture", except for Terry Gross interviewing book authors who use the word? For me it was about 10 years of hearing them say "Enhanced interrogation" or "Harsh interrogation techniques", because that was the language the government wants used. For that matter, how much analysis was there about whether the war was a good idea, as opposed to government-friendly discussions about whether it's going well or not.

Yes, most of the journalists on public radio are probably Democrats, but even so, it's still typically one pro-government talking head vs. another slightly different pro-government talking head.

Now, there were politicians who really hated NPR, and they tended to be Republicans, but it was as much because of NPR's elitist positions on the arts as anything else; Jesse Helms was more a "black velvet paintings of Elvis" kind of guy than a "controversial cutting-edge art" NPR fan.

Re:And then it gets defunded (1)

Phroggy (441) | about 6 months ago | (#46147885)

If NPR sounded less like MSNBC, I doubt the Republicans would bother with their pittance of the federal budget. NPR is so left wing that commercial talk radio is almost exclusively right wing.

I'm not sure if you never listen to NPR, or never watch MSNBC...

High Frequency Sound and Receiver Which Vibrates? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46144879)

Might work, but how would you know if you can't hear it - needs a visual "proof of on".

NPR association fail (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about 6 months ago | (#46144889)

As the wikipedia link in the summary points out, Prairie Home Companion is not an NPR production. While it is mostly broadcast on NPR stations (at least, in the US) it is not actually done by NPR.

Re:NPR association fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145021)

The summary doesn't say it's made by NPR, it says most people think of shows like that when they think of NPR. If you're going to try to get modded up by being pedantic, at least have the decency to do it well.

Re:NPR association fail (3, Interesting)

alexander_686 (957440) | about 6 months ago | (#46145151)

This is a very fine distinction.

Public radio are a bunch of independent radio stations. They order programing from a variety of sources. The big one is NPR. Minnesota Public Radio set up American Public Radio as an alternative source of programming the public stations could buy. One could argue it was to get a bigger cut of the fees for PHC.

But the point is that you have 2 different corporations producing content for public radio. They are not that different.

Re:NPR association fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145595)

Yea, I more quickly associate NPR with bleeding heart liberals, whining hippies, and left-wing-granola-crunching nutters, than anything else. Though there is the occasional gem.

It's not a favorable association, let's say that.

Television (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46144905)

There is this thing called television. The deaf can readily get emergency information from it today.

Try a little harder next time. (3, Insightful)

westlake (615356) | about 6 months ago | (#46145069)

There is this thing called television. The deaf can readily get emergency information from it today.

Works only when your TV set is on.

Weather radios have a stand-by mode and battery back-up power.

Re:Try a little harder next time. (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about 6 months ago | (#46145225)

Or TXT messages.

And radio only works if the radio tower wasn't hit by the hurricane or tornado.

Re:Try a little harder next time. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145307)

I used to work for an NPR station, and as wonderful as the NPR network is, this is a 20 year old idea, trying to be current.

Are you seriously telling me that asking deaf people to buy a special radio with limited market (read: therefore expensive) is going to be all that successful.

I think it would be cheaper to use the cell phone network (text system) and have a special app that would listen for the "alert" message. I am sure you could give away smart phones (to the deaf) for cheaper than NPR distributing it via their Satellite system, and each of their member stations upgrading their system to transmit the message, and of course the final end single purpose receive at the deaf person's location.

They got to start thinking out of the box.

Re:Try a little harder next time. (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | about 6 months ago | (#46145399)

I made that exact point in another post on this same article. The comment was in response to some AC troll trying to be funny and making a joke about Republicans and how they hate "deaf people" or some such thing. Because only Liberals think the Government should fix a problem that isn't really a problem.

Re:Try a little harder next time. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145451)

They got to start thinking out of the box.]

Or inside another, slightly different box. (Albeit a box that includes a subsystem almost perfect for this exact use.)

Re:Try a little harder next time. (1)

sjames (1099) | about 6 months ago | (#46146019)

When is the last time you saw a cellphone with a bed shaker?

Cellphones also only work if the tower isn't hit by a tornado or hurricane

Re:Try a little harder next time. (2)

AK Marc (707885) | about 6 months ago | (#46145247)

So we need weather TVs that work on battery power or have those cool cranks.

Re:Try a little harder next time. (1)

PPH (736903) | about 6 months ago | (#46145313)

But this is National Public Radio. Radio. So you'd expect them to formulate some solution that keeps them, or radio in general, in the loop.

So its an FM receiver with an EAS [wikipedia.org] decoder and it uses an Android device as a display. Why not just send EAS text out via SMS/Twitter broadcasts?* Because this isn't National Public Interwebs, that's why.

*Actually, this is done already. But the radio folks were feeling a bit left out.

Re:Television (1)

Velox_SwiftFox (57902) | about 6 months ago | (#46145305)

Yep, what was wrong with the crawling message at the bottom of the screen telling the deaf that if this had been a real emergency, they would have been instructed to tune their AM radio to 640 or 1240KHz for the details?

My first thought was... (2)

roc97007 (608802) | about 6 months ago | (#46145023)

...Garrett Morris repeating the alert, only louder.

But this generation wouldn't get it.

Re:My first thought was... (0)

geekoid (135745) | about 6 months ago | (#46145281)

WTF is 'this generation'? Why would it apply to /.?
you don't think the only person from that generation on /. is you, do you?

um no (2, Insightful)

Charliemopps (1157495) | about 6 months ago | (#46145077)

First off, "A Prairie Home Companion" isn't anyones favorite show... it's a leftist talk show with skits featuring horrible acting, which I wouldn't mind as I do like SNL but I give SNL a pass because it's funny, where as, Prairie Home Companion is about as un-funny as anything I've ever heard. Sadly, most of the shows surrounding it on Sundays are awesome and some of my favorite radio... so I have to spend part of the day enjoying the radio, then screech in horror as I race to turn it off as soon as I hear Garrison Keillors voice, then wait for the show to go off before I switch back.

Secondly, Deaf people don't listen to the radio you morons. I've had several deaf friends over the years and none of them owned a radio that I knew of. They watch TV with subtitles and TV solved the whole "Deaf people alerts" problem long ago by putting the alerts in TEXT on the TV. I believe they even have a little flashy light thing that you can hook up via SAP to alert them should they be in another room.

Re:um no (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145271)

First off, "A Prairie Home Companion" isn't anyones favorite show... it's a leftist talk show with skits featuring horrible acting, ...

What's it like being brainwashed?

I have listened to NPR and PBS and well, as an educated skeptical person, I listen and check the facts the best I can. That is something that should be done with ALL media outlets - whether it's on purpose or not, ALL media outlets have a bias and we should be skeptical and on guard.

Regardless, NPR has been shown to be the most neutral outlet in the US. We, the US, have gone so far to the right, that when we hear something in the center, it sounds leftist to us - it's pretty sad when you think of it.

One last thing, you need some Rhubarb Pie! [youtube.com]

Re:um no (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145465)

We, the US, have gone so far to the right, that when we hear something in the center, it sounds leftist to us - it's pretty sad when you think of it.

What "center"? Compared to the left and right halves of the Communist party in China? Perhaps compared to the politics of Zimbabwe? Ah, you mean compared to Europe.

As an American living in Europe, I've heard this line so many times -- but I don't think that it's really so true. Is the left in the US not as far left as the left in Europe? Probably. But the right is not really as far right as Europe either. The crackpots of the far right in the US could be actual head of a party here. That said, it would be a minor third or fourth party, but still.

So if you really believe this, okay, but on what issues are you talking about?

Re:um no (2)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46145521)

...as an educated skeptical person...

NPR has been shown to be the most neutral outlet in the US.

I don't listen to NPR or have a dog in this fight at all. But how on earth can you call yourself an "educated skeptical person" and write drivel like "shown to be the most neutral"? Who compiled the metric? Is this on the same Left--Right axis as the one you agree with? For that matter, how can you rank a series of sentences as "Left" or "Right" in any kind of objective fashion at all? I can assure you that for any sentence and any position on a leftist-rightist ranking you choose, I can find somebody who disagrees with the ranking.

Re:um no (0)

geekoid (135745) | about 6 months ago | (#46145273)

".. it's a leftist talk show with skits featuring horrible acting,.."
are you.. feverish? stupid? just don't know what leftist means? I don't like it, but to call it a leftist talk show is pretty ignorant, at best.

"Deaf people don't listen to the radio.."
So that mean they won't be interested in reading the shows?
http://www.sense.org.uk/conten... [sense.org.uk]

Well what do you know, it's about taking radio shows and translating them to text.

It appears sir, YOU are the moron in this conversation.

Re:um no (1)

afidel (530433) | about 6 months ago | (#46145291)

Meh, the problem is also solved via the EWS warnings going out via cellular towers, most folks today carry a cellphone and all new ones have to have EWS alerts available. (though I do have a problem with the EWS targeting, they know which tower and concentrator you are talking to, why do they give tornado warnings for the other side of the state?). In an emergency it's a lot more likely your cellphone will work than your tv (and solar chargers that will power your cellphone are small and inexpensive, though the fuel for the tower probably becomes a problem first).

Re:um no (2)

Roblimo (357) | about 6 months ago | (#46146099)

A lot of people don't seem to have picked up on the fact that the NPR Labs emergency device picks up both radio broadcasts and satellite transmissions. That means it will work even when the power is out and the cellular towers stop working.

After Hurricane Charlie in Florida my wife and I drove from Orlando to Bradenton via side roads, and there was no cellular service and half the radio stations were off the air. And even if the cell towers work, the systems get overloaded during emergencies because everybody's Aunt Mabel calls to check on Barnaby, Suzanne, and Little Emil, so you're better off with an emergency radio than a cell phone.

Old Sailor's Motto: "Prepare for the worst days and the good days will take care of themselves."
       

Re:um no (1)

afidel (530433) | about 6 months ago | (#46146167)

I'm not seeing anything about the alerts being via satellite other than the fact that CAP alerts go out to the stations via PRSS, the end devices only receive the alert from the digital subchannel from the participating stations. As to the cell network being overloaded, EWS messages go out as broadcast SMS messages which means if your cellphone is on it will receive the message, data and voice channels being overloaded won't stop your phone from receiving SMS.

Re:um no (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 6 months ago | (#46145409)

Deaf people don't listen to the radio you morons.

Well, I wouldn't call it "listening," but I have a cousin who likes to crank the bass and 'feel' what's on the radio.

He's also a pretty damn phenomenal guitarist, considering he has no idea what it sounds like.

So, you know... generalizations and all...

Re:um no (0)

radarskiy (2874255) | about 6 months ago | (#46145509)

"Deaf people don't listen to the radio you morons"

No one listens to the radio, since it is comprised of electromagnetic radiation.

Re:um no (1)

neminem (561346) | about 6 months ago | (#46145523)

Actually, I'd say they're mostly comprised of plastic and metal, if you want to really get nitpicky.

Next time, submit this in ALL CAPS (2)

sandbagger (654585) | about 6 months ago | (#46145103)

You guys are slipping.

Seriously, the work on broadcasting done by some of the national broadcasters has been amazing. If you are ever bored, go dig through the R&D archives of the Radiophonic workshop of the BBC. Fascinating stuff. In particular, the British Sound with lots of PRAT.

Maybe something more obvious (2)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 6 months ago | (#46145157)

Like something small, personal, visual, that can provide vibrations and video that is always on....Like a Smartphone.

Re:Maybe something more obvious (1)

Livius (318358) | about 6 months ago | (#46146095)

It sounds like they are doing a rather minor variation of exactly that.

Still, I applaud any effort to leverage new technology to constructively engage the disabled. Most "accommodation" I've seen is stuff which goes out of its way to humiliate the disabled, inconvenience the able-bodied, and provide no value to its target demographic.

For example, my city has pedestrian walk signals that put out an extremely obnoxious continual beeping. The noise is perfectly constant and provides no information to the visually impaired or anyone else, it's just offensive noise pollution that lets politicians pretend they are doing something.

Radio broadcast texts? (1)

Lanforod (1344011) | about 6 months ago | (#46145197)

I don't know anyone who even has one of these emergency radios. Being HOH myself, I'd never get one, rarely ever even try to listen to standard FM/AM radio broadcasts, and would never try to listen to an emergency broadcast. Be prepared for weather. Know what is expected before the normal comm channels go down. If something is unexpected, most people aren't going to find out via emergency radios, but by word of mouth.

Re:Radio broadcast texts? (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 6 months ago | (#46145423)

I don't know anyone who even has one of these emergency radios.

I presume you don't live in Tornado Alley.

They practically hand those things out at birth around here.

You know what would've been nice... (4, Insightful)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 6 months ago | (#46145249)

Just as a one-off, you might have subtitled the video.

Just sayin'.

Re:You know what would've been nice... (1)

Ksevio (865461) | about 6 months ago | (#46146023)

Well there is the transcript below it...

Re:You know what would've been nice... (1)

Roblimo (357) | about 6 months ago | (#46146117)

Our transcriptionist was running late today, but the transcription is now posted. Thanks for noticing.

"Radio Broadcast Data System" anyone? (1)

davidwr (791652) | about 6 months ago | (#46145459)

Oh wait, I just read the freaking article, and that's exactly what they are using.

The only question I have is "Why is the industry just now getting around to this? With respect to broadcast-FM non-satellite radio, wasn't this technology available in 1997 when the Emergency Alert System replaced the Emergency Broadcast System?"

Not hard to do, they already exist... (4, Interesting)

Lumpy (12016) | about 6 months ago | (#46145577)

My grandmother had a Weather radio that when it went off it would flash a red strobe so that she could see that there was an alert. she then could call the operator with her TTD and ask them what the alert was. Newer ones should be able to decode the data stream burst that has the same voice alert as text and display it on a scrolling screen.

Everything is already in place for it, The problem is no manufacturers care at all about the Deaf so they dont make an EAS radio for them.

Re:Not hard to do, they already exist... (1)

antdude (79039) | about 6 months ago | (#46148579)

TTD is so old school. I wished there was a way to do it over the Internet. It didn't work over dial-up modems when I tried to figure how to do it. I don't want to use the hardware devices.

Wait, wait! Don't tell me (1)

jfdavis668 (1414919) | about 6 months ago | (#46145655)

that NPR has labs?

Re: Wait, wait! Don't tell me (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46147751)

That! I didn't know there was a lab either. As far as bashing the NPR shows, I can jump on that bandwagon with Human Kind, From Scratch (most times), and On Being (I think that was finally sac'd)... But, WWDTM, APHC (PRI), Car Talk, Diane Rhem, Forum (listening now on Sat feed from KQED), Market Place (APM), Fresh Air, TAL, Splendid Table. et.al inform and sometimes entertain commercial free (underwritting and begging for $$s sure, but that's not as annoying as BUY, BUY, BUY sales ads).

I did some work on this a while back. (2)

gfm (79509) | about 6 months ago | (#46148059)

A couple years ago when I was working at chumby I worked with Rich Rarey at NPR Labs and wrote the code to get the braille device talking to the display device you see at 6:35 (which is an Insignia Infocast, Best Buy's OEM version of the Chumby 8) and also wrote an ActionScript extension module in C++ to allow them to write to the braille printing device and get input from it (via a custom USB protocol) within a Flash/ActionScript3 app, which is what their closed caption software was written in.

Pretty cool project -- glad to see they are still working on this and extending it.

What are the Job Qualificatiions? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46149447)

What are the job qualifications to be an NPR person?

Re:What are the Job Qualificatiions? (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 6 months ago | (#46150307)

Being able to talk clearly and directly, without the need to shout or use the special effects button all the time.

Why? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 6 months ago | (#46150871)

What did the Deaf ever do to them?

It's bad enough the hearing have to put up with this irrelevant crap.

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