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How Online Clues Located North Korea's Missile-Launcher Factories

timothy posted about 10 months ago | from the follow-the-contrails-backwards dept.

The Military 71

itwbennett writes "It all started with a parade through Pyongyang on April 15, 2012, held to commemorate the birthday of the country's founder, Kim Il Sung. At this parade, one thing had analysts buzzing: six mobile launchers carrying KN-08 intercontinental ballistic missiles. Bloggers in China quickly noted the similarities between the trucks and those used by the Chinese military, right down to the shape of the windows and the grille pattern. It's the stuff of spy thrillers. A few seconds of video, literature, a couple of memoirs and Google Earth helped locate a secret North Korean military plant — and using none of the classified tools of the intelligence trade."

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Open Source Intelligence (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46219025)

"This is the world of open-source intelligence."

Remind me again as to how reddit foiled the Boston Marathon Bombing plot?

Re:Open Source Intelligence (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46219125)

"This is the world of open-source intelligence."

Remind me again as to how reddit foiled the Boston Marathon Bombing plot?

Remind _me_ again as to when the WMDs turned up in Iraq...

Re:Open Source Intelligence (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46219175)

"This is the world of open-source intelligence."

Remind me again as to how reddit foiled the Boston Marathon Bombing plot?

Remind _me_ again as to when the WMDs turned up in Iraq...

And tell _us_ how this prevented the Germans from bombing Pearl Harbor.

Re:Open Source Intelligence (0)

JustOK (667959) | about 10 months ago | (#46219711)

The Americans bombed Pearl Harbour because they were trying to get protect Austria

Re:Open Source Intelligence (2)

davester666 (731373) | about 10 months ago | (#46219739)

What do you mean? We TOTALLY FOILED Germany's surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.

Unfortunately, we were looking West for the next attack, when we should have had at least a ship or two with radar pointed eastward.

Re:Open Source Intelligence (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 10 months ago | (#46221019)

What do you mean? We TOTALLY FOILED Germany's surprise attack on Pearl Harbor.

Unfortunately, we were looking West for the next attack, when we should have had at least a ship or two with radar pointed eastward.

Japan is to the west of Hawaii.

Re:Open Source Intelligence (1)

SuperSlacker64 (1918650) | about 10 months ago | (#46221103)

If you go far enough, it is also to the east.

Re:Open Source Intelligence (1)

CheezburgerBrown . (3417019) | about 10 months ago | (#46222189)

Japan is in the Far East. Just like Guam and all those other islands. Did you even high school?

Re:Open Source Intelligence (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 10 months ago | (#46228675)

Japan is in the Far East. Just like Guam and all those other islands. Did you even high school?

Sure, but if you are standing in Hawaii and getting attacked by Japan, it is probably coming from the west.

Re:Open Source Intelligence (1)

bhcompy (1877290) | about 10 months ago | (#46219655)

Well, they turned up in the 80s when the Kurds were gassed. Consider yourself reminded

Re:Open Source Intelligence (1)

slapout (93640) | about 10 months ago | (#46220181)

According to Wired: [wired.com] 2004.

Re:Open Source Intelligence (4, Informative)

Technician (215283) | about 10 months ago | (#46219198)

This is called Overt Intelligence. Covert is spying on the hidden. Overt is gathering public info.

Re:Open Source Intelligence (4, Insightful)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 10 months ago | (#46221003)

reddit.... intelligence...

I see the problem with this logic.

Re:Open Source Intelligence (1)

Nyder (754090) | about 10 months ago | (#46224385)

"This is the world of open-source intelligence."

Remind me again as to how reddit foiled the Boston Marathon Bombing plot?

Remind me how the NSA foiled the Boston Marathon Bombing plot?

Can They Locate Slashdot Users?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46219035)

Where are they this week? I noticed the comments are really sparse on all the stories.

Re:Can They Locate Slashdot Users?? (4, Funny)

Calydor (739835) | about 10 months ago | (#46219155)

There's a comment boycott going on to protest the Beta. It's a step up from the flood of Fuck Beta comments.

Re:Can They Locate Slashdot Users?? (2)

Talderas (1212466) | about 10 months ago | (#46219553)

Risking getting downmodded by lurking boycotters....

Filtering out the "fuck beta" comments. I found the comments on slashdot to be saner and more useful on the whole. I'm questioning what loss slashdot might suffer from losing those user because to me it seems like a lot of the acerbic toxicity has gone and disappeared.

Re:Can They Locate Slashdot Users?? (1)

Qzukk (229616) | about 10 months ago | (#46220249)

I was interested to see what they'd do [slashdot.org] and sadly it turns out the pessimism was warranted, they're running phpBB right now.

I think we have legitimate gripes [slashdot.org] . Not the least of which is that if you're using the new site, clicking these links takes you nowhere.

running the new site now (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46227347)

I'm in the "beta" right now, and clicking those links "works for me"

Re:running the new site now (1)

Qzukk (229616) | about 10 months ago | (#46227995)

"works for me"

Love them air quotes. Did it switch you back to Classic view to show you the comment? Because this [imgur.com] is what the beta gives me when I go to http://beta.slashdot.org/comme... [slashdot.org]

8/10 made me reply, troll. Next time try faking up a screenshot so you can pretend beta actually works.

Re:running the new site now (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46232201)

different AC, and the links work for me, though they do revert me to "classic" slashdot, automagically, on their own

Wow ... (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 10 months ago | (#46219105)

Tom Clancy would be proud of that one.

Open Sources to find state secrets is somewhat impressive.

Maybe the NSA just needs to learn how to use Google a little better instead of just spying on all of us.

Re:Wow ... (1)

gtall (79522) | about 10 months ago | (#46219334)

Yep, all the U.S. needs to do is rely on its enemies being stupid enough to leak the information to the interwebs in videos. All secret information is known to be kept in video format for use by academics interested in non-proliferation.

Re:Wow ... (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#46221053)

You leap to the assumption that this place isn't known to the US military, or isn't already on someone's target list. People who know what they are looking for probably have have traffic analysis on this place better than the two different photo dates that Google Earth has.

The utter lack of activity near the site, the lack of raw materials stacked up near by, the poor conditions of the roads (especially near the second plant), lack of a rail spur, all suggest this place is in very limited production, or entirely mothballed.
There does seem to be a lot of what look like grave yards near by, and seemingly empty barracks.

Very few people, and no vehicles are seen near the second plant. Even the first discovered plant has less activity than the nearby farms.
The second looks abandoned even in 2004 using Google Earth's time slider.

You can deduce a lot about any area using google earth, but when some place has such a different culture as North Korea, you end up guessing a lot.

Re:Wow ... (1)

chriscappuccio (80696) | about 10 months ago | (#46219541)

Open source intelligence is big in the NSA world. Just see http://das.doit.wisc.edu/

Oh, really? (5, Informative)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | about 10 months ago | (#46219183)

carrying KN-08 intercontinental ballistic missiles

Last I checked, those KN-08 ICBM's were mock-ups, not real missiles.

Note that apparently the KN-08 is a liquid-fueled ICBM, which means it is completely useless for defensive purposes (you don't store liquid fueled missiles fueled-up, you fuel them just before launch - which would take too long to allow them to be used to react to an attack), and only really useful for a first strike.

Re:Oh, really? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46219809)

Like the directly-stated stance of NATO on the response to a hypothetical Soviet invasion of Europe, though, I imagine such weapons are rather more useful than "completely useless" in defense (including deterrence) against conventional-weapons aggression.

Re:Oh, really? (2)

Richard_at_work (517087) | about 10 months ago | (#46220031)

The KN-08 missiles on show were training rounds - you don't want live ordnance, even made safe, in a parade.

And there are many liquid fuelled missiles which dont need fuelling at the last moment.

Re:Oh, really? (5, Interesting)

erice (13380) | about 10 months ago | (#46220061)

Note that apparently the KN-08 is a liquid-fueled ICBM, which means it is completely useless for defensive purposes (you don't store liquid fueled missiles fueled-up, you fuel them just before launch - which would take too long to allow them to be used to react to an attack), and only really useful for a first strike.

Not necessarily. Titan II used liquid fuel and could be kept fully fueled in the silo indefinitely.

Atlas could be fueled in 15 minutes. Late variants reduced this further but loading the kerosene in times of high tension, which could remain in the rocket for long periods, and only waiting to the last minute to load the liquid oxygen. These versions were also kept in silos so they were only vulnerable during the time needed to load the oxidizer.

Re:Oh, really? (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 10 months ago | (#46221079)

I suggest you look at storable liquid fueled rockets. The Titan II and SS-18 are two examples of liquid fueled rockets that could be stored fueled.

Or, "How North Korea's incompetence... (1)

coldsalmon (946941) | about 10 months ago | (#46219298)

... revealed the location of its missile-launcher factories." The real story is not how clever the researchers were (though they were clever), but how stupid North Korea's government is.

Re:Or, "How North Korea's incompetence... (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#46221309)

Why would you say this was stupid?
They were clearly making a propaganda video, in 2012.

The plants (both of them) were there as early as 2004. In fact the first plant already looked abandoned in 2004.
So as far as is publicly known, these plants remained hidden for in excess of 15 or perhaps 20 years. Probable long after the missiles became obsolete, even by Nork standards.

The construction of these plants use was probably already know by the the US military when they went up. After all, they are the largest structures around, and
their construction was probably more than a little obvious.

Only a casual reference in a North Korean defector memoirs pointed to military factories centered around Kanggye.
That location suggestion is the ONLY thing that let these non-military investigators pinpoint that town. The defector could probably have told them much more.

Open Source? (4, Interesting)

bobbied (2522392) | about 10 months ago | (#46219300)

Ah, come on. Open source intelligence? What's unusual about this?

I remember from Tom Clancy's "Clear and Present Danger" where the CIA was watching Cable News, getting lots of information from what was freely available from the likes of CNN and Fox. I also remember watching CNN reporting from Down Town Baghdad while the US was dropping bombs at the start of desert storm. Can you say instant BDA on the raid? "Yes, our power just went out! Good thing we have battery powered equipment so we can show you what's happening next to ground zero. Oh wow, Baghdad TV just went off the air too!" You know that this often happens in real life.

What's important about this story is that the North Koreans messed up, assuming they intended to keep this development a secret. Somehow, I doubt they made a mistake, but this release was calculated, knowing that the west would figure out what's going on. They are simply too controlling.

Re:Open Source? (2)

Havokmon (89874) | about 10 months ago | (#46219699)

Ah, come on. Open source intelligence? What's unusual about this?

I remember from Tom Clancy's "Clear and Present Danger" where the CIA was watching Cable News, getting lots of information from what was freely available from the likes of CNN and Fox. I also remember watching CNN reporting from Down Town Baghdad while the US was dropping bombs at the start of desert storm. Can you say instant BDA on the raid? "Yes, our power just went out! Good thing we have battery powered equipment so we can show you what's happening next to ground zero. Oh wow, Baghdad TV just went off the air too!" You know that this often happens in real life.

What's important about this story is that the North Koreans messed up, assuming they intended to keep this development a secret. Somehow, I doubt they made a mistake, but this release was calculated, knowing that the west would figure out what's going on. They are simply too controlling.

The assumption is that the west didn't know anything about it. I bet the CIA has rooms full of people going over satellite images of North Korea that would make Google Maps look like something Magellan used.

I would be surprised if the west didn't know about it.

Now, that's totally different from discovering the Icelandic military (is there one?) has ICBMs. I would assume that's not a place we're actively looking to protect ourselves from.

Re:Open Source? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46219891)

Now, that's totally different from discovering the Icelandic military (is there one?) has ICBMs. I would assume that's not a place we're actively looking to protect ourselves from.

Clearly you've not heard of the deadly-accurate Lutefisk 1B gut bomb.

Re:Open Source? (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | about 10 months ago | (#46221299)

That building is not a missile factory, it is a maintenance and check out building. North Korea has bad weather so using a building for check out would make a lot of sense.

Re:Open Source? (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#46221501)

Exactly.

Nothing in this story or the linked TFA, or links in the TFA to other TFAs suggests this is unknown to the military.
And it wouldn't take CIA to find it, regular military are doing a lot of photo analysis, both in computers and with eyeballs.

Further, the suggestion that the Norks "messed up". If they "messed up" it was letting the defector live to mention this town in his memoirs.

For example, Ko Chong Song, a North Korean defector, published a book in Japan describing the locations of defense enterprises, stating Pyongyang produces “missile launchers” at the No. 81 Factory located in the “Chungsonggan workers’ district, Songgan County, Chagang Province, about 2.5 to 3 kilometers from Songgan-up".

Another account, posted online by an anti-DPRK dissident group, describes a gruesome incident of cannibalism at the “No.11 munitions factory (Hakmu worker’s district 6 km northwest of Jonchon, Jagang) where missile launchers are manufactured”

(Starvation might explain what looks like graves on the grounds of the first discovered plant located at 40.64565, 126.43338 ).

So the plants were probably well known to the military. Once the Norks realize the US already knows about them, there is little point in pretending they don't exist.

Re:Open Source? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46223603)

it is not unusual for high explosives to be stored in dirt mounds laid out in a grid, it prevents one small accident from becoming a much larger one

Re:Open Source? (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#46223721)

True, but these dirt mounds are very small, and they weren't there in 2004, but were there in 2011 imagery.
Also this place assembles trucks and launchers. I don't believe anyone has said that munitions or war heads are stored there.

Re:Open Source? (1)

Rich0 (548339) | about 10 months ago | (#46231439)

I would be surprised if the west didn't know about it.

Yup, unless there was something to be gained by letting them know this would fall into the category of "keeping them guessing." If you announce that you know about 47 important targets, then you are potentially divulging that you don't know about the other 13 targets that you didn't mention, and of course you invite the other side to move those 47 things to a place where you won't find it.

No doubt many (but not all) things of importance that NK possesses are on US target lists, and there are plans so that in the event of a war you could probably predict which sortie will end up bombing it.

Re:Open Source? (2)

X0563511 (793323) | about 10 months ago | (#46219721)

You do realize that Tom Clancy's fiction novels are, well, fiction?

Re:Open Source? (2)

bobbied (2522392) | about 10 months ago | (#46220043)

Yes, but I've had more than one person who was "in the know" about specific classified things tell me that Tom Clancy had an uncanny ability to somehow come up with fiction that matched reality too close and too often to be just a coincidence. I think he did a lot of careful research but he was also given information about some things he shouldn't have known as well.

But that begs the question why would he be given such information? I think the answer is more complex than it looks at first blush. I actually think that he was given real and exaggerated information on purpose in an effort to make the US sound more capable than we actually where at the time, while having the aura of being valid by providing known classified information along side the fiction. It was partially fact, partially propaganda.

But, even if he wasn't feed information on purpose, I'm sure he ferreted out a number of things that where classified by his careful investigation and observation of the things he wrote about. Some where lucky guesses, but NOBODY is that lucky.... (Even card counters in Vegas)....

So if his story says field CIA offices in foreign countries watch cable news, I'm going to bet they likely do. In fact, I'll bet they have folks assigned to this 24/7/365 for every major news service in every language they can to raise warnings of world events.

Re:Open Source? (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#46221569)

Yes, but I've had more than one person who was "in the know" about specific classified things tell me that Tom Clancy had an uncanny ability to somehow come up with fiction that matched reality too close and too often to be just a coincidence.

I suggest your "someone in the know" actually knows less then you think.

Clancy was investigated by military intelligence, and they couldn't find anything but a diligent researcher who could spin publicly known facts into excellent stories. He probably had more info from the writings of Russian defectors than from American sources.

Re:Open Source? (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 10 months ago | (#46221819)

It's just a theory of mine. Yea it's *possible* he just came up with all this stuff, he's a bright guy and all, but he is frighteningly close in some cases where I have first hand knowledge. Personally, and in the opinion of some folks that I've talked to, there is a bit more than clever observation going on.

At the very least, he's had detailed conversations with people who should have been a bit more careful. They may not have found a specific instance of leaking information to him, but in total he's been able to put enough puzzle pieces together to glean some pretty sensitive details. Proving he received classified information directly well enough to charge folks is one thing, having it actually happen in a thousand minor ways is quite another.

Re:Open Source? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46222229)

It's just a theory of mine. Yea it's *possible* he just came up with all this stuff, he's a bright guy and all, but he is frighteningly close in some cases where I have first hand knowledge. Personally, and in the opinion of some folks that I've talked to, there is a bit more than clever observation going on.

At the very least, he's had detailed conversations with people who should have been a bit more careful. They may not have found a specific instance of leaking information to him, but in total he's been able to put enough puzzle pieces together to glean some pretty sensitive details. Proving he received classified information directly well enough to charge folks is one thing, having it actually happen in a thousand minor ways is quite another.

More likely you just didn't realize how much information was publicly available, or what can be trivially extrapolated form publicly available information.

Most people are pretty unobservant and lazy, paying attention and doing research can get you a lot more info than most people realize.

Re:Open Source? (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 10 months ago | (#46222619)

Yes, but I've had more than one person who was "in the know" about specific classified things tell me that Tom Clancy had an uncanny ability to somehow come up with fiction that matched reality too close and too often to be just a coincidence. I think he did a lot of careful research but he was also given information about some things he shouldn't have known as well.

A few facts, some intelligent guesses, and extrapolation from that can sometimes take you a long way.

Inside the Making of 'Dr. Strangelove' @2 [youtube.com]

Re:Open Source? (1)

AK Marc (707885) | about 10 months ago | (#46220097)

Tom Clancy didn't think so.

And you realize that your argument is essentially stating that cars aren't real if someone talks about the cars from Fast and Furious.

The flipper cars from Fast and Furious 6 were real. They built one and intended to use stunt ramps and such to augment the flipping qualities. But the thing actually worked, and worked so well, they re-wrote the script to get more flipping in, because it was such a cool effect, and without any props or CGI.

Yes, the plot was fiction, but the cars in the movie were 100% real. The fact they were demonstrated in a work of fiction doesn't mean it wouldn't work in real life. It did. Just like the intelligence agencies do collect information from the media. That's real. Just because the most popular example is from a work of fiction doesn't make the practice fiction. It's very real.

Re:Open Source? (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | about 10 months ago | (#46226011)

What's important about this story is that the North Koreans messed up, assuming they intended to keep this development a secret. Somehow, I doubt they made a mistake, but this release was calculated, knowing that the west would figure out what's going on. They are simply too controlling.

They obviously did not intend to keep the existence of these rockets, nor the use of Chinese trucks as launch base, a secret. Those were on full display on the military parade.

They may not be so happy though to have the exact location out in the open. Here is where they messed up. While it's no surprise to be in their main military production area (a city that's not in official maps - but likely well marked on US military maps), the exact location of the actual buildings is another matter. Too eager to show their great leader overseeing production of the latest and greatest military development, not looking carefully enough at the background (major info came from views through windows in the background), and poof, your cover is blown.

Secret location? (1)

tomhath (637240) | about 10 months ago | (#46219336)

A few seconds of video, literature, a couple of memoirs and Google Earth helped locate a secret North Korean military plant

More like "helped a couple of bloggers locate...". There's no reason to doubt that the US and China already knew about it. Still says a lot about how much information is online these days.

Re:Secret location? (1)

plover (150551) | about 10 months ago | (#46228673)

A few seconds of video, literature, a couple of memoirs and Google Earth helped locate a secret North Korean military plant

More like "helped a couple of bloggers locate...". There's no reason to doubt that the US and China already knew about it. Still says a lot about how much information is online these days.

The thing I wonder about is if making this information public did much damage to Western military plans. Assuming the West knew about it, they already had it loaded into their targeting systems. If the DPRK believed this factory was secret, they would be unaware that the hammer was poised to smash it. Now they may rebuild it in a new secret location, and until it's rediscovered by the intelligence agencies, it may not be properly targeted.

Re:Secret location? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46231097)

Nobody compotent who deals in secret things builds plans based around their potential opponents not knowing the secret. NK knows if things get all loud and bright on the peninsula that every inhabited and developed inch of NK will be smoldering inside of a week. That is why they plan to be in Seoul in a day. This location doesn't really matter after missles start flying. It only really matters in the time just before, when NK still has the potential innitiative.

Is this really "open source?" (1)

coldsalmon (946941) | about 10 months ago | (#46219563)

Last I checked, the term "open source" referred to "a development model promotes a) universal access via free license to a product's design or blueprint, and b) universal redistribution of that design or blueprint, including subsequent improvements to it by anyone" (Wikipedia). It does not mean "a process for creating online content using information which is freely available." It is worth noting that Google Earth and YouTube, the main tools used, are not open source. Just because something happens on the internet, or can be done for free in your Mom's basement, does not mean that it's open source. Although, I hear that your Mom is open source.

Re:Is this really "open source?" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46219775)

Maybe you should check again? Open Source Intelligence [cia.gov] is the correct term for intelligence gathering from publicly available sources.

Re:Is this really "open source?" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46219993)

You forget how much Republicans and religious people hate open source. My boss that is one of those people regularly uses the term "open sores." That is what his kind thinks of us. They want to bring a closed North Korean-style government here, and they are being very successful. Just look at Congress. The reasonable party had the majority when the ACA was passed. Now the anti-tech people rule. They want to associate anything they can negative with the term open source. Their painting with a broad brush and making generalizations is just ridiculous.

Re:Is this really "open source?" (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#46221591)

You forget how much Republicans and religious people hate open source.

You forget how stupid this sort of hate mongering makes you look.

Re:Is this really "open source?" (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 10 months ago | (#46221459)

Then, you need to check better.

Getting information from "Open Sources" goes back decades, because if you could read it in the paper, see it on the news, or look out your window ... that was an "open source".

Collecting and using publicly available information for intelligence gathering predates your definition of 'open source' -- it was a term used in the second world war.

Sorry, but you're just plain wrong on this one. Long before it defined a software development model, it described means of gathering intelligence.

Re:Is this really "open source?" (1)

coldsalmon (946941) | about 10 months ago | (#46222177)

Interesting, it does indeed appear that "open source intelligence" is a separate term, distinct from "open source software." I see from the Wikipedia article on Open Source, that the term was first formally adopted vis a vis software in 1998. The page for Open Source Intelligence links to a corporate whitepaper from 1997 using the term "open source intelligence," which suggests that this term predates "open source software." I wonder if the OSS people knew about that usage when they chose the term.

Do you know of any other usages of "open source" that predate the OSS usage? The term is used very widely today, so I'd be interested to know of any other cases with a distinct history.

top secret strategy (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 10 months ago | (#46219647)

Or...follow the trucks and see where they park. Wow, such spy skills!

Re:top secret strategy (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#46221611)

There are no trucks anywhere to be seen in the sources used. In fact the plants look almost abandoned on Google Earth.

Cool (1)

viperidaenz (2515578) | about 10 months ago | (#46219861)

You found where they parked the trucks two years ago. You know Google Earth isn't real-time eh?

Re:Cool (1)

Hadlock (143607) | about 10 months ago | (#46220069)

Liquid oxygen (part one of a two part fuel solution these devices use, part 2 being highly refined kerosene, or "RP-1") requires specialized holding facilities and due to it's temperature can't be stored on a truck for more than a couple of days in any usable quantities, which means their "home base" can't be more than 10-15 miles away. That's still a big area, but pretty easy to monitor with satellite photography.

Re:Cool (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#46221639)

This is a factory that builds these trucks, or stores them. (There is very little indication on Google Earth that these plants are still in active use).

There isn't a shred of evidence they are deployed there.

Hey bigmouth (0)

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Re:Hey bigmouth (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46223053)

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You surely do care viperidaenz (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 10 months ago | (#46223625)

Banned? Who's banned?? Not I. You FAIL even posting ac viperidaenz

APK

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Article conclusion (1)

Ogive17 (691899) | about 10 months ago | (#46220137)

From the article
"and the lack of any low-level windows indicated the building was either partially buried or blocked in"

That's quite an intuitive leap.. most warehouses and factories in N. America have this same feature except none are partially buried or blocked. It's done for security, secrecy and efficiency. They don't want anyone looking in or out.

Re:Article conclusion (1)

icebike (68054) | about 10 months ago | (#46221655)

Yup, they got a lot wrong. Looking at the Google earth images you can see that they were not blocked in.
Why would you put ground level windows in a secret plant?

Next steps (3, Funny)

sunking2 (521698) | about 10 months ago | (#46220439)

Launch some missiles at it, wait for reports to come in on N.K.s largest indoor wedding reception hall being destroyed.

Re:Next steps (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | about 10 months ago | (#46221585)

You left out a few "glorious" and "supreme" adjectives. Otherwise, totally believable.

Connecting the dots ... (1)

Ihlosi (895663) | about 10 months ago | (#46221731)

... of freely available information is one of the tools of the intelligence trade. Besides piping your personal data into government computers, there are probably a few departments that spend their days reading international newspapers.

socks (1)

Tablizer (95088) | about 10 months ago | (#46223909)

I bet there is a building there with all my missing half-paired socks. Time to get googlin'

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