Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

1GB of Google Drive Storage Now Costs Only $0.02 Per Month

timothy posted about 7 months ago | from the even-I-can-do-that-math dept.

Google 335

SmartAboutThings writes "Up until today, I always had the impression that cloud storage was pretty expensive and I'm sure that many will agree with me. It's a good thing that some bright minds over at Google have the same impressions as they now have drastically discounted the monthly storage plans on Google Drive. The new monthly storage plans and their previous prices are as follows: $1.99 for 100GB (previously $4.99), $9.99 for 1TB (previously $49.99), and $99.99 for 10TB.The 2 dollar plan per month means that the price for a gigabyte gets down to an incredibly low price of only two cents per month."

cancel ×

335 comments

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (5, Insightful)

ravenlord_hun (2715033) | about 7 months ago | (#46475527)

...with the company that specializes in data mining!

I mean, what could possibly go wrong?

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (5, Funny)

alen (225700) | about 7 months ago | (#46475577)

OMG, google will know where i've taken all the photos of my kids

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475827)

You've engaged in child pornography?

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (3, Insightful)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 7 months ago | (#46475993)

If you take a photo of your own nude baby child and upload it to your Google Drive, I'm sure the law is badly written enough to the point that you were "uploading child porn on the Internet".

The morale of this story is: don't have children, the government will use them against you one day.

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (1)

alen (225700) | about 7 months ago | (#46476021)

yep, all the parents i know are rotting in jail because their kids turned them in for kiddie porn

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (1)

canadiannomad (1745008) | about 7 months ago | (#46476131)

Isn't that the problem? Now it doesn't take any human involved even caring about it to be detected, flagged, and investigated before hauling your children off to a gov't training camp^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H orphanage, and you in front of a judge.

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46476067)

It's "moral" -- not "morale".

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (1, Flamebait)

noh8rz10 (2716597) | about 7 months ago | (#46476089)

marked as funny but... yes. they will connect your face to your kids face, and add you to the network of people and relationships along with facial recognition, age and place. welcome to the panopticon, only $0.02 per GB.

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475589)

Encryption Baby!!!

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475599)

You can always wrap the data in something like Viivio that encrypts it. Google can see the directory tree, but the actual content of the files would be hidden from them.

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46476101)

Viivo concerns me. Why do I need to have a username and password for a site to decrypt my data? I don't know enough (tried it briefly) to really find it better or worse, but I'd trust a key I type in than have to depend on some third party to authenticate and release my encryption key for use.

If I want to encrypt data, I'll use a method that depends on the data stored:

For data used often, a TrueCrypt volume. If I'm just using one platform, then Apple's Disk Utility (with the 8MB "bands" that allows expansion), or create a .VHD and expand it when needed in Windows.

For data archived, I can stick it in a WinRAR file. Yes, this can be brute-forced, but that is why one uses a long passphrase (32+ characters.)

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (5, Funny)

tiberus (258517) | about 7 months ago | (#46475619)

Ever get the feeling Google should be paying us $.02/month per gigabyte, just sayin'

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (2)

mlw4428 (1029576) | about 7 months ago | (#46475779)

No. You're not forced to use them.

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (4, Informative)

JMJimmy (2036122) | about 7 months ago | (#46475851)

Seriously. This "article" reads more like an ad. $120/year for 1 TB is more than 9 times what I'd pay for 5 years of a 1 TB internal SATA.

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475943)

Do you carry your SATA drive around with you wherever you go and attach it to every computer you use?

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (4, Interesting)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 7 months ago | (#46476085)

Do you carry your SATA drive around with you wherever you go and attach it to every computer you use?

Yeah, there's a portable SSD in my bag, with eSATA and USB. There's a couple of 64gb SD cards in there too.

It's smaller than my smartphone and a lot more sturdy. It sits in one of those little slots on the side. Never had a problem with it.

I've had enough of trusting companies like Google to always have a particular service available and to keep their snoots out of my stuff.

On the other hand, if a company that doesn't data mine, and encrypts all data and does not acquiesce to NSA requests, then we can do business. But not for free or cheap because of data mining. I don't like F2P. I don't want anything for free. I don't trust anything that's being offered to me for free or for cheap. It just means the true price is hidden and that's creepy.

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (4, Insightful)

rudy_wayne (414635) | about 7 months ago | (#46475955)

Seriously. This "article" reads more like an ad. $120/year for 1 TB is more than 9 times what I'd pay for 5 years of a 1 TB internal SATA.

There are several problems with the whole "cloud" thing:

- I can buy a few terabytes of local storage for the same or less than paying Google
- Google constantly changes things (features, terms of service, etc) and if you don't like it, tough shit
- Encrypted or not, you have no control over your own data, they do
- ISPs severely throttle upload speeds. Getting a few terabytes into the cloud will take a really long time

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (5, Insightful)

neoform (551705) | about 7 months ago | (#46476017)

And when that 1TB drive fails?

Cloud storage usually comes with a ridiculously high durability. S3 offers 99.999999999% over the course of a year. Your 1TB drive wont.

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (0)

ackthpt (218170) | about 7 months ago | (#46475631)

That doesn't bother me.

What bothers me is that Google is constantly changing things and if you don't like it, tough.

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (2)

Aighearach (97333) | about 7 months ago | (#46475867)

I agree. Feature thrash sent me from fanboy to "slowly migrating away, one service at a time."

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (1)

Aighearach (97333) | about 7 months ago | (#46475907)

The main use case is not for private data. Private data is likely to fit into their free plan. This is for businesses who are using google services already, and want to share a lot of data "in the cloud."

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (0)

ravenlord_hun (2715033) | about 7 months ago | (#46476037)

Our business data is pretty darn sensitive. There is no way we could possibly trust a 3rd party to actually store it - and I'm pretty sure a lot of other business are that way too.

I also fail to see what's so good in "cloud" compared to a reliable off-site backup solution...

Encryption? (1)

dc29A (636871) | about 7 months ago | (#46475929)

Good luck data mining my TrueCrypt containers ...

Re:Encryption? (5, Funny)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 7 months ago | (#46476047)

I'm worst than that, I make randomly-written files, compress them to ZIP, compress them again in RAR, put that inside a GZ, ROT13 the whole thing and then encrypt it.

And for the cherry on top, I name the file "confidential_data.dmg" before uploading it.

Re:Encryption? (1)

ravenlord_hun (2715033) | about 7 months ago | (#46476119)

Just write them onto tape, and wait a few years until GPUs are even better at cracking or a bug has been found in TrueCrypt (remember, the first audit is only starting now).

Re:Yeah, you can totally trust your data... (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 7 months ago | (#46476087)

If they can mine my TrueCrypt container, then they're doing something amazing.

it is happening again ? (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475535)

I just got redirected to beta. Please do not start that again. It is rude.

Now we have an answer to the 20TB backup question. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475541)

10TB for $99 a month isn't too terrible for a backup if you value your data enough to do so.

Re:Now we have an answer to the 20TB backup questi (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 7 months ago | (#46475911)

It is when compared to 10TB of local storage.

Re:Now we have an answer to the 20TB backup questi (2)

rudy_wayne (414635) | about 7 months ago | (#46476029)

10TB for $99 a month isn't too terrible for a backup if you value your data enough to do so.

That's $1200 a year. For the same $1200 you can buy a NAS box of equal or greater capacity that's yours and doesn't require monthly payments.

Re:Now we have an answer to the 20TB backup questi (4, Insightful)

MightyMartian (840721) | about 7 months ago | (#46476159)

But that NAS is likely sitting at your location, which means if it gets burned down by insane meth heads or swallowed by a sinkhole, you're good and screwed.

For my business, I use DFS that replicates our shared drives at all three locations, so I feel fairly confident that an almost up-to-date mirror of the data is being held at two other locations, all of which are separated by a lot of miles. Coupled with offsite backup, I feel the business data is secure.

At the moment my personal data is on Dropbox, with my absolutely confidential data in a Truecrypt container. Still, Dropbox is kind of expensive for the 7 or 8gb of data I'd like to store, so I will definitely be considering Google's offering. Since both work the same, at least for the PC versions, in that each computer has a full copy of the data, if Google goes offline or pulls the plug, I still have my multiple copies sitting around.

Th real cost (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475543)

The real costs are being met by Google being able to snoop even deeper into your life and selling more of your life to advertisers.

Re:Th real cost (2)

wiredlogic (135348) | about 7 months ago | (#46475565)

Just upload encrypted filesystem containers and go about your business.

You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475553)

And you can use it anywhere. And it has USB 3.0 speed. And it won't be data mined by Google.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (2)

mythosaz (572040) | about 7 months ago | (#46475691)

And get another one to back it up, and perform your own backups regularly, which of course has an opportunity cost of zero. :/

I've got 4-5TB of movies, music, and photos. I'm not ready to pay $50/mo for universal access and backups.

...but it's getting close to affordable.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475847)

(local storage/backup) : Still cheaper. Still better. And if you live in a place where bandwidth caps and low connection speeds are a norm (like where I am), then USB3 drives are really a no-brainer. Just buy a lot of drives. I have like 10 plugged in right now, for a total of about 20TB. I run custom backup software. There's really no better or cheaper solution.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (2)

mythosaz (572040) | about 7 months ago | (#46475881)

Still better for what?

Certainly not ease of access across multiple devices in and out of your own network or away from your own storage. Certainly not for backup, without investing in your own off-site recovery method. Certainly not in terms of time spent caring for that solution.

Having a large virtual drive in the cloud would make my life easier, but certainly not cheaper.

I don't think it's cost effective for me yet, but there's certainly a lot of green checkmarks on the chart for their solution.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 7 months ago | (#46475973)

> Certainly not ease of access across multiple devices in and out of your own network or away from your own storage. Certainly not for backup, without investing in your own off-site recovery method.

Make a friend. Store it at his house.

Rent a safety deposit box.

Buy a fire safe.

Mail a copy to your mother's house.

The problem with "the cloud" is recovery speed. Upload speeds aren't that great either.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (1)

MightyYar (622222) | about 7 months ago | (#46475947)

Agreed. It's still not cheap enough to move my media to, but it sure beats Dropbox on price.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 7 months ago | (#46475703)

Except that many phones don't support plugging in USB drives. Come to think of it, a lot of tablets don't either.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (1)

vux984 (928602) | about 7 months ago | (#46475741)

For slightly more you can get consumer NAS stuff. WD Live NAS drives for storing 1TB aren't much more than the USB versions.

And they even have phone/tablet apps for accessing them.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (1)

gmack (197796) | about 7 months ago | (#46475799)

I already have a 2 TB nas stuffed with movies bit this has the advantage that it is off site.

If your house burns down your NAS goes with it. At least this way I have off site recovery.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (0)

rudy_wayne (414635) | about 7 months ago | (#46475903)

Except that many phones don't support plugging in USB drives. Come to think of it, a lot of tablets don't either.

So stop pretending that phones and tablets are real computers and stop trying to use them that way.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | about 7 months ago | (#46475999)

But why would I want to pay for a monthly fee on storage on something like a laptop or desktop? I could just buy a bigger hard drive and save money in the long run.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46476137)

Phones and tablets are real computers, stop pretending otherwise and your life will be less stressful.

Think of it as "computers" (Street Joe can use it) vs "workstations" (people who use computers to work).

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (1)

Guido von Guido II (2712421) | about 7 months ago | (#46475791)

And you can use it anywhere. And it has USB 3.0 speed. And it won't be data mined by Google.

If you have a fire or flooding and you're not keeping the backup at an offsite location, you've also lost all your data.

Re:You can get a 1TB external for like, 80 bucks (1)

kaiser423 (828989) | about 7 months ago | (#46475913)

That's great and all, and I have NAS made of those at home, but I still backup all of my pictures at full resolution to Google's servers. That 1TB drive isn't going to do much for me for disaster recovery when it's sitting right next to my NAS. Then I also get the upside of my phone syncing thumbnails of everything I upload, the ability to see those pictures from everywhere and to also create albums and share them without having to physically send the pictures around.

I honestly could not care less about my pictures being data mined by Google. I'm posting a chunk of them online anyways. I don't think people pay for TB's of cloud storage to backup critical information. Critical information is typically pretty small in nature and compresses well anyways; no need for cloud storage, a 32GB usb stick in a fire/water proof lockbox is more than adequate for disaster recovery of that type of info.

And .. (2)

OzPeter (195038) | about 7 months ago | (#46475569)

How much does it cost you to get that terabytes worth of data from your local computer to Google Drive?

Re:And .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475739)

Let's see... One month of DSL with upload speeds at 756kbps for $50... roughly $200 plus four months of my life.

Re:And .. (2)

Daniel Hoffmann (2902427) | about 7 months ago | (#46475783)

Startup idea, GoogleDrive bittorrent client. Downloads stuff directly into Drive, then add streaming service for GoogleDrive.

Re:And .. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475917)

If my Chromecast could access and stream from my Google Drive, that would be great

Re:And .. (1)

John Bokma (834313) | about 7 months ago | (#46475959)

Bittorrent is only going to make a difference if multiple people want to download /your/ data at the same time.

Re:And .. (1)

kaiser423 (828989) | about 7 months ago | (#46475935)

0? I routinely push a couple of TB around with my residential Comcast connection. The connection is a sunk cost since I live in the digital age and am going to have it anyways. Having it sync all photos, videos, etc between NAS's and generating backups, uploading them, etc during off-peak hours is minimal to no cost...

Slashvertisement? (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475573)

I'm curious, how much does it cost to run a Slashvertisement like this? I'm putting together a marketing plan and want to see if it fits within my budget.

Re:Slashvertisement? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475679)

Depends on how flexible you are with payment terms, I'd imagine. There is cash...and then there is knee-pad service. Just sayin'...

Re:Slashvertisement? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475977)

Leave Slashdot. Head over to AltSlashdot.org [altslashdot.org] . Fuck beta and fuck slashvertisements.

Re:Slashvertisement? (1)

ArcadeMan (2766669) | about 7 months ago | (#46476155)

Maybe they're being paid in GoogleCoins? (coming soon)

Math is hard (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475581)

1TB for $9.99 is even cheaper... Just saying.

That's nice - but it's based in the US (2)

SustainableJeroen (2474816) | about 7 months ago | (#46475591)

I've always been wondering why no Google-equivalent (or Facebook, or Twitter, or Amazon, for that matter) came out of Europe. Not every one is comfortable storing personal or business data on servers in the US.

Re:That's nice - but it's based in the US (1)

ledow (319597) | about 7 months ago | (#46475757)

Dunno about anyone else, but Google and Bing in the UK both provide data protection guarantees in line with EU data directives (or else a lot of places wouldn't be able to use them).

I've put Google Apps for Education into several schools, and that's pretty much their first concern - and the first one to be laid to rest, at least on paper...

Re:That's nice - but it's based in the US (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475875)

The problem is that the US government can compel both Google and Microsoft to surrender that data, data guarantees be damned - a secret court order will trump any other contracts US companies might make. And as we all know it's not just a hypothetical, the US government has shown itself more than willing to take that route.

Of course if you're actually want/need to be secure you should locally encrypt any data going to the cloud, regardless who the provider is, where they reside, or what they claim.

Re:That's nice - but it's based in the US (1)

petermgreen (876956) | about 7 months ago | (#46476015)

at least on paper...

And therin lies the problem, if a megacorp whose headquarters are in the US is given the choice between handing the data over to the US government (and hence breaking EU law but probablly not being punished for it since the EU government won't know it happened) or refusing to hand the data over and getting punished by the US governemnent for doing so which do you think they will choose?

Re:That's nice - but it's based in the US (1)

tero (39203) | about 7 months ago | (#46475933)

There is - F-Secure has a cloud solution called Younited. http://www.younited.com/ [younited.com]

Re:That's nice - but it's based in the US (2)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 7 months ago | (#46476031)

Are you worried about the NSA? 'Cause here in the states they pretend like they need a reason to gather data. Snooping data in non-US countries is their raison d'etre.

Why do you think $.02*12/year/GB is cheap? (2)

cb123 (1530513) | about 7 months ago | (#46475623)

A 4TB drive is under 200 USD from several vendors. That is only $.05/GB. So, at 0.24/yr. This is 5..10X more expensive than commercial off the shelf home drive space assuming you have to buy a new drive every 1-2 years. That time figure is pretty conservative.

So, yeah, you maybe cloud storage gives you some replication, and the syncing of that replication costs some amount of money for bandwidth. How much extra that reliability costs really depends on the data dynamics, though and isn't as easy to estimate.

Also, 5..10X more is just about the ratio of SSD storage to magnetic disks. SSD is considered "relatively expensive storage" by most people I know.

Re:Why do you think $.02*12/year/GB is cheap? (4, Informative)

DaHat (247651) | about 7 months ago | (#46475803)

Do you think data you upload to a cloud storage provider lives on just one hard disk that is plugged into the wall and that's it?

While some data centers do rely on more consumer level hardware (vs enterprise)... to help make up for the inherent unreliability of consumer level drives, they will replicate the data across multiple HDDs, in multiple racks, and possibly across multiple datacenters... as well as monitor the underlying bits for bitrot and overall integrity... in addition to sometimes offering backup options of what has been stored.

And this aside from offering you 24/7 access to the data from anywhere in the world while keeping that HDD and the attached server running (and power consuming) and with a redundant power system available.

All of these things quickly add up in terms of cost... so yes, two cents/GB is quite inexpensive for cloud storage these days when compared to like offerings.

Re:Why do you think $.02*12/year/GB is cheap? (1)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about 7 months ago | (#46476099)

I have a 500GB external that 1GB at this point has cost me less than $0.01/Mo... I more recently got a 3TB on sale for $103 but I'm not sure I would use a cloud storage service for large amount of data just because of the time involved with transferring that much data.

let's say I buy a 2TB hard drive for $99 each month, after 5 months I have 10TB, and at the end of the year I would have 24TB. That's more than twice the storage space and i don't need to spend $99/mo to keep it.

I'm confused. (1)

The Good Reverend (84440) | about 7 months ago | (#46475633)

"The 2 dollar plan per month means that the price for a gigabyte gets down to an incredibly low price of only two cents per month."

Translation, please. I must have missed something.

Re:I'm confused. (1)

ledow (319597) | about 7 months ago | (#46475673)

There's a $2 per month plan.

On that plan, the price per gigabyte works out to $0.02 per month. Because you get 100Gb.

What's hard about that? Okay, it won't win the Plain English Campaign, but for sure it's not the most obscure thing I've ever read.

Re:I'm confused. (0)

flargleblarg (685368) | about 7 months ago | (#46475721)

On that plan, the price per gigabyte works out to $0.02 per month. Because you get 100Gb.

Actually, you get 100 GB (gigabytes), not 100 Gb (gigabits).

Re:I'm confused. (1)

The Good Reverend (84440) | about 7 months ago | (#46475723)

Yeah, I'm seeing my mistake now. Too much/not enough coffee...

Re:I'm confused. (1)

fnj (64210) | about 7 months ago | (#46476007)

Too not much enough coffee happens to all of us.

NSA Storage Service (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475651)

The NSA has an even better deal. The only price you pay for storage of all of your data is your freedom.

The storage is cheap but.. (1)

invictusvoyd (3546069) | about 7 months ago | (#46475653)

The algorithms scanning through it , trying to make marketing sense of all that data are expensive ..

__________________
whoppie facebook is free !!!!

So the disk space is not that expensive... (1)

rnturn (11092) | about 7 months ago | (#46475663)

... but for a lot of people, moving the data to and from the storage is what's really going to be costly. It'll be interesting to see how much of that disk space ends up going unused when word gets around about how much users get clobbered with data overage charges by AT&T, et al trying to use the cheap disk space.

Re:So the disk space is not that expensive... (1)

DaHat (247651) | about 7 months ago | (#46475835)

It depends on how you use that space... and how quickly you fill it.

Sure your ISP may not be happy if over the course of a few days you upload a few hundred gigs to any provider like this... but after that's done, the bandwidth bill stays low as there isn't usually much churn.

In the case that the amount of data to be uploaded is even larger... some cloud providers have the option to simply mail hard drives directly to the datacenter to import the data directly.

Get what you pay for (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475669)

Much happier paying [url=https://tarsnap.com]Tarsnap[/url] for proper secure storage.

Re:Get what you pay for (1)

Stratus311 (894962) | about 7 months ago | (#46475823)

No Windows support and no GUI. This should totally appeal to the masses.

Derp: 1GB is FREE (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475683)

1GB is FREE. Up 15GB is FREE
Information is a hell of a drug.

Sounds great... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475709)

Now if the software could actually handle syncing existing folders... seriously

Costs money to upload it (1)

js3 (319268) | about 7 months ago | (#46475769)

You get charged for bandwidth so don't think it's cheap

Re: Costs money to upload it (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46476079)

I pay the same to my ISP no matter how idle my link. Uploading to this costs me nothing extra.

Bad math (1)

flargleblarg (685368) | about 7 months ago | (#46475787)

Summary parrots article, saying:

$1.99 for 100GB (previously $4.99), $9.99 for 1TB (previously $49.99), and $99.99 for 10TB.The 2 dollar plan per month means that the price for a gigabyte gets down to an incredibly low price of only two cents per month.

While it's true that the 2-dollar plan per month are $0.02 per month, the other plans are only $0.01 per month. Failing to mention this is bad math.

Here is a table of prices:

$2 / 100 GB / month ==> $0.02 / month
$10 / 1 TB / month ==> $0.01 / month
$100 / 10 TB / month ==> $0.02 / month

(Yes, I know it's technically $1.99 and not $2.00, but let's face it... prices ending in ".99" are retarded.)

Re:Bad math (1)

flargleblarg (685368) | about 7 months ago | (#46475821)

$100 / 10 TB / month ==> $0.02 / month

Annnndd.... I can't type today.

(Why the hell doesn't Slashdot let us edit our articles to correct typos after posting?)

Re:Bad math (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475879)

Correct Math:

Here is a table of prices:

$2 / 100 GB / month ==> $0.02 / month
$10 / 1 TB / month ==> $0.01 / month
$100 / 10 TB / month ==> $0.01 / month

Obama will snoop on your stuff! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475833)

The reason it's so cheap is because Obama and his NSA goons pay Google to access people's data. In effect, they cover Google's costs and Google passes these savings to you!

every single kb is mineable, so why not ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475841)

with that kind of information you should be able to predict the future.

Amazon Glacier (5, Interesting)

hawguy (1600213) | about 7 months ago | (#46475853)

If you're looking for long-term archival storage, Amazon Glacier [amazon.com] is a pretty good deal at a $0.01/GB. I backed a few hundred GB's of data there and it's only costing me a few dollars/month. Restores will cost money, but if my house burns down and I lose my NAS + backups, I won't mind paying them a few hundred dollars to restore my data to a hard drive and ship it to me [amazon.com] . Does Google Drive provide a way to ship your data on a hard drive? It would take me days or weeks to download data over my currrent internet connection (assuming I don't hit my ISP's data cap)

Almost as cheap as it used to be. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475871)

I bought in to google storage back before they went to monthly billing...
I pay $5 a year for 20Gb... works out to just over 2 cents per month per gigabyte...

Under the new plan I could pay just under 2 cents per month per gigabyte...

Except google is saying they actually are giving me 36 Gigabyte; 16GB bonus for being a paid user and an early adopter... which works out to 1.2 cents per gigabyte per month...

Of course, some of that storage would probably be free if I weren't paying for it... so who knows what the real savings or cost actually is... not me. But I can still stomach $5 a year to store a bunch of photos in a location where I can share them with others or not as I choose.

Commercial? (1)

joebok (457904) | about 7 months ago | (#46475873)

Why do I get the feeling this was a paid ad?

I'll stick with SpiderOak and TarSnap. (1)

grub (11606) | about 7 months ago | (#46475887)

I'll stick with SpiderOak [spideroak.com] and TarSnap [tarsnap.com] Fully encrypted, zero knowledge from their end. A bit more money but good peace of mind.

Re:I'll stick with SpiderOak and TarSnap. (1)

Danathar (267989) | about 7 months ago | (#46475909)

use encfs with Google Drive and it's just as safe.

Re:I'll stick with SpiderOak and TarSnap. (1)

grub (11606) | about 7 months ago | (#46476063)

Yeah encfs is great for live filesystems, no argument there. I meant for archiving and backups of things offsite, should have clarified.

Google cannot be trusted with important things. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475931)

Google has a long history of getting rid of features or tools on a whim, and with
little advance warning to those who used those things.

If you trust Google while being aware of the above, you are a fool and you deserve
no sympathy when you are screwed by Google.

How do you mount the drive? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475953)

I couldn't find anything on their site that states if it is NFS or SMB. I signed up for it, but I found nothing anywhere in the instructions that indicate how you actually access your files. It seems like a scam.

Re:How do you mount the drive? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46476121)

Must use the Google Drive client or use the web interface.

Also, Google will mine your data for anything useful about you they can sell. This is why they want you using it so badly.

Way too expensive! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46475989)

So my 2TB drive paid for itself in two months! Cool... I'm gonna be rich. ; )

Slashdot Google shill advertisement (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46476025)

This should be a banner ad.

Linux client (3, Interesting)

dlenmn (145080) | about 7 months ago | (#46476113)

Now, if only they would make a Linux client. Then, I might use it. Until then, Dropbox all the way!

All kinds of stupid.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 7 months ago | (#46476127)

They arent doing it out of the goodness of their hearts, so therefore the profits in the deal are coming from somplace else - the service you need to access all that data, someone elses advertising, etc.... Its really like saying that the packets of ketchup at Mc Donalds are FREE if you close your eyes and dont care to see all the rest of whats involved.

Load More Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?