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NYC Considers Google Glass For Restaurant Inspections

samzenpus posted about 8 months ago | from the a-picture-is-worth-a-thousand-curds dept.

Google 104

New submitter TchrBabe writes: "NYC is now considering equipping its Health Department inspectors with Google Glass to provide a record of restaurant inspections. 'A yearlong pilot program would require 10 percent of the 160 health inspectors to wear video devices — including, possibly, the much-maligned Google goggles — under legislation to be proposed Thursday. "I think it would limit the abuses on both sides of the table, and it would allow for a more objective view by the judge on the violations that have been cited," said bill sponsor Vincent Ignizio.'"

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Added benefit (5, Interesting)

Chrisq (894406) | about 8 months ago | (#46723885)

Wear google glass and get excellent service ....

Re:Added benefit (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46723973)

It's a very bad idea for the government to use proprietary junk. All software the government uses should be fully open source.

Re:Added benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46726519)

don;t worry NSA gets their cut from google already

Re:Added benefit (3, Funny)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 8 months ago | (#46724011)

As long as they don't enter any French McDonald's, they'll be fine.

Re:Added benefit (5, Interesting)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 8 months ago | (#46724181)

My favorite story about the differences in hygiene standards in Europe compared to America.

Health inspectors walk into a famous French restaurant in NYC. 3 Michelin stars, celebrity chef. Cat crosses path.

Inspectors: Sir, do you realize there's a cat in your restaurant? This is not allowed
Owner: Of course there's a cat in the restaurant, if I can't have him here how would you suggest I handle the rats?

Inspectors close restaurant. Exeunt

The funny thing is, living in Europe, and then living in Asia I can tell you most of the world does not have the same very very high standards of the US. And, surprisingly, people do not die from eating raw milk products, or from eating cheeses and meats that have been allowed to sit out in the heat all day, or from any of the many other sins an American health inspector will make you repent for.

Re:Added benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724197)

Yeah and lots of people don't die bathing in the Ganges river that's full of human feces. Doesn't mean it's a good thing to do.

Re:Added benefit (1)

Electricity Likes Me (1098643) | about 8 months ago | (#46724219)

Dyssentry usually isn't fatal. Usually.

Re:Added benefit (2)

ShanghaiBill (739463) | about 8 months ago | (#46725585)

Dyssentry usually isn't fatal. Usually.

According to WHO, about 760,000 [who.int] children die every year from diarrhea caused by food or water borne pathogens. In light of that, I think it is silly to say that sanitation and health inspections are unnecessary.

Re:Added benefit (1)

gnick (1211984) | about 8 months ago | (#46726233)

I think it is silly to say that sanitation and health inspections are unnecessary.

They are unnecessary. They're incredibly useful and prevent many illnesses some of which could be fatal, but if I was dying of dehydration, I'd drink water regardless of what it was tainted with - Similar for food. The WHO can give you stats on malnutrition/starvation around the world. This is NYC, where many people eat very well and many people eat what others throw away. If I go to a restaurant, I expect to be served sanitary food (usually - unless I intentionally walk into some dive where it could damned well be stray cat meat, but I at least know ahead of time what to expect.)

This is really just presenting a method for maintaining some kind of level metric for those inspections. So whatever standard these restaurants are being held to is based on what they're actually doing rather than bribes/negligent inspectors/etc. So, when I go in, I know whether I'm getting properly prepared food-stuffs or something that may or may not send me to the ICU.

Re:cumulate filth (1)

hoboroadie (1726896) | about 8 months ago | (#46724245)

I don't like to overwhelm my biodefenses. YMMV.

Re:cumulate filth (2)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 8 months ago | (#46724353)

Your immune system is sort of like a muscle. In order for it to be healthy and functioning properly you need to work it out. So, if you never introduce foreign bacteria that need to be killed, your immune system will weaken, and the likelihood that it will get bored and attack itself (also known as allergies) increase. This doesn't just include bacteria; societies where people are more likely to be exposed to parasites like worms tend to have a very low or zero incidence of gastrointestinal diseases like irritiable bowel syndrome, causing some to theorize that human beings need quite a bit of dirt in their diet. In fact, some vitamins (like B vitamins) can't be synthesized by humans but instead need to be ingested from bacteria in soil (e.g. dirt), or the flesh of animals that ate dirt.

(My ex girlfriend was a PhD Microbiology and this is what she considered good dinner conversation (which will perhaps tell you why she is also my ex). I don't know any of the papers she read, but if you are in need of a citation, google is your friend)

Re:cumulate filth (1)

nitehawk214 (222219) | about 8 months ago | (#46724537)

foreign bacteria that need to be killed, your immune system will weaken, and the likelihood that it will get bored and attack itself (also known as allergies) increase. This doesn't just include bacteria; societies where people are more likely to be exposed to parasites like worms tend to have a very low or zero incidence of gastrointestinal diseases like irritiable bowel syndrome

Well that could not be any more wrong. Dysentery is one of the leading cause of deaths in countries with little to no sanitation system. Fortunately when someone in a western country contracts one of these diseases, they can go to a hospital, get some fluids and antibiotics

I suspect you are not an anti-vaxer or a naturalist, just misinformed. This is the same completely made up argument that they use. Vaccines do not cause diseases, and eating dirt does not make you healthy.

PhD Microbiology? Try a PhD in Epidemiology or Pathology for actual knowledge on how diseases affect humans. Probably a good thing she is your ex now, as she is also one of those PhD that assumes they are an expert in everything, including things only tangentially related to their field.

Re:cumulate filth (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724653)

"Well that could not be any more wrong. Dysentery is one of the leading cause of deaths in countries with little to no sanitation system."

Because, of course, there can't be any middle ground between "dysentery kills us by the scores" and "my kitchen needs to be as clean as a surgical room".

"PhD Microbiology? Try a PhD in Epidemiology or Pathology for actual knowledge on how diseases affect humans."

Oh, c'mon... a PhD in Microbiology is certainly spotted here; I bet you don't hold one -or are you one of those that thinks that in order to have a sensible opinion on a matter you really need a PhD in the very specific sub-sub-field? The rough way the immune system works should be general knowledge after all.

Re:cumulate filth (3, Interesting)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 8 months ago | (#46724809)

Actually I think you're misinformed. How exactly does it follow that just because people die of dysentery, all hygienic practices in the US not done in other countries are aimed at preventing dysentery?

Furthermore, as stated, European countries often don't have the same health regulations as the US. And, contrary to popular opinion, Europe is full of western countries.

Again, Dysentery is mostly caused by amoebas, and a bacteria called shigella. Shigella is naturally found in humans and apes and you contract it by drinking water with human feces in it. (Which is why when you're in an asian or african country you shouldn't be drinking tap water).

That's completely different then unpasteurized milk, or food that's been left out in the heat.

Furthermore, if you google what I said you'll get all kinds of links on the first page. Like link 1:

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com... [usatoday.com]

Re:cumulate filth (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724603)

Your immune system is sort of like a muscle. In order for it to be healthy and functioning properly you need to work it out. So, if you never introduce foreign bacteria that need to be killed, your immune system will weaken, and the likelihood that it will get bored and attack itself (also known as allergies) increase. T

Exactly why I pick my nose and eat it- to give my immune system some germs to work out on.

Re:cumulate filth (1)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about 8 months ago | (#46726937)

I prefer licking subway poles, more variety to train my immune system

Old Berkeley Hippie here... (1)

hoboroadie (1726896) | about 8 months ago | (#46725101)

I use Chlorine compounds with discretion, and I eschewed Triclosan long before the FDA noted its questionable properties. I think that cleaning up other people's public filth*, moving Cow dung about the farm, and generally rooting around in dirt have adequately inoculated my system. I use a reasonable amount of water and simple soap products to try and keep a lid on the pathogenic stuff.
* I wash the hell out of my hands before I touch myelf- don't disrespect those Mycobacteriums...

Re:cumulate filth (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724405)

Ha!

I don't like to overwhelm my biodefenses. YMMV.

and I like to actually have some by, you know, not living in a sterile spotless environment!

Re:Added benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724371)

Dunno how often this needs to be told to you yankees, but Europe is not a country. Please stop equating all of us with the French.

Re:Added benefit (1)

Chrisq (894406) | about 8 months ago | (#46724551)

Dunno how often this needs to be told to you yankees, but Europe is not a country.

Though Germany did its best to fix that ..

Re:Added benefit (1)

K. S. Kyosuke (729550) | about 8 months ago | (#46724387)

First, European standards of food safety are most certainly high enough. Second, I was referring to incidents with head-mounted cameras.

Re:Added benefit (1)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 8 months ago | (#46724829)

Was there a head mounted camera incident in a french mcdonalds?

Re:Added benefit (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724927)

http://techcrunch.com/2012/07/16/augmented-reality-explorer-steve-mann-assaulted-at-parisian-mcdonalds/

Re:Added benefit (1)

ZombieBraintrust (1685608) | about 8 months ago | (#46724435)

With raw foods it is about the low quality food that poor urban people consume. Raw milk might not kill you at a French New York Restaurant. But it has certainly killed lots of urban poor people. Raw milk was banned as a way of limiting TB. In 1815, one in four deaths in England was due to "consumption". Anti-biotics and a vacines have reduced the risks of eating raw foods. (but only if you have good health care)

Re:Added benefit (4, Interesting)

operagost (62405) | about 8 months ago | (#46724775)

"Consumption" was an old name for tuberculosis. TB is normally transferred through the air, not food contamination.

Raw milk is not generally available to poor urban people today, because farms are no longer near cities. It's mostly consumed in rural or suburban areas, near the source farms. There is no need to ban raw milk with the incredibly small risks associated, compared to the carcinogens in city water, for example. So banning raw milk is essentially an attack on poor and middle class rural people, which is fashionable today.

Re:Added benefit (2)

Mr. Flibble (12943) | about 8 months ago | (#46725873)

"Consumption" was an old name for tuberculosis. TB is normally transferred through the air, not food contamination.

Raw milk is not generally available to poor urban people today, because farms are no longer near cities. It's mostly consumed in rural or suburban areas, near the source farms. There is no need to ban raw milk with the incredibly small risks associated, compared to the carcinogens in city water, for example. So banning raw milk is essentially an attack on poor and middle class rural people, which is fashionable today.

You only named one risk to raw milk, not the many that exist. Remember, it takes only one sick cow out of a hundred to pass on harmful bacteria. Grass fed cows do not have some magical quality that works as an antibiotic in milk. City water is in fact safer because it is subjected to a similar treatment as pasteurization (Chlorination, Ozone etc). I am not aware of any "carcinogens in city water" or their relative rate of harm compared to unpasteurized milk, so I suspect that is just conjecture.

An example of the bacteria that can be found in cows milk: Brucella, Camplyobacter, Listeria, Mycobacterium bovis, Salmonella and shiga toxin producing E. coli., parasites such as Giardia and viruses such as the norovirus.

For more reading:
http://skeptoid.com/blog/2011/... [skeptoid.com]

Re:Added benefit (1)

davester666 (731373) | about 8 months ago | (#46727765)

and yet for years, my family, and a bunch of others from our local church, would go to a farm of a member and get a couple of buckets of milk every week from him. he also sold it commercially, but would do this on the side. nobody got noticeably sick from this [in our family, or hearing about it from other families].

course, this is just a 1-person anecdote, so you can apply it to everyone.

Re:Added benefit (3, Informative)

Enigma2175 (179646) | about 8 months ago | (#46725965)

"Consumption" was an old name for tuberculosis. TB is normally transferred through the air, not food contamination.

From the CDC [cdc.gov] :

"Before the invention and acceptance of pasteurization, raw milk was a common source of the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, ..."

Re:Added benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46726551)

"Consumption" was an old name for tuberculosis. TB is normally transferred through the air, not food contamination.

I thought it was called Consumption because the patient tended to waste away as if the disease was consuming them from the inside.

Re:Added benefit (2)

biodata (1981610) | about 8 months ago | (#46724613)

The funny thing to me is the idea that having a cat in a restaurant is somehow unhealthy. Oh Noes! An Animal! Forget the fact that all the people cooking, cleaning and eating in the place are also animals, and are much more likely to infect you.

Re:Added benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46725605)

There are enough things a cat can transmit to humans (rabies, lice, that virus that makes you like cats*, etc.) that banning them from public places is a fairly defensible position. They are also a common allergen.

Anyway I think the point was more that the rats (wild vermin) were what got the restaurant closed, and the owner not being smart enough to take his chastisement for the cat and incriminating himself further was what's funny.

*seriously look it up

Re:Added benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46725689)

There are exceptions, but most people bathe daily, don't carry major parasites, have immunizations, etc.

Re:Added benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46726557)

It's the damned walking all over the counterspace that seems to be the main problem....

humans don't have toxoplasmosis pathogens (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46727733)

read the title

Re:Added benefit (1)

bickerdyke (670000) | about 8 months ago | (#46724909)

Unless you claim that story happend more than 40 years ago, I'd call BS.

Animals in the kitchen would be a reason to close a restaurant over here, too. even a flowerpot with fresh basil next to the stove might be a point in an audit. (soil contamination)

And I don't think food standards are higher in the US. What they may be seen as a possible higher hygienic standard only lead to more than questionable chemicals [about.com] allowed in US food. Or use of irradiation.

The most absurd difference IMHO can be found here: http://io9.com/americans-why-d... [io9.com] Two completly valid ways to reduce salmonella infections from raw eggs, but completly diametral and uncompatible. (tldr: US eggs need to be kept in the fridge as washing of the "natural" salmonellas also removes the protection from further salmonella infection)

Re:Added benefit (1)

KingOfBLASH (620432) | about 8 months ago | (#46725541)

I call BS for your call on BS.

I live in Europe and I can't count the number of times I saw a cat or dog or other animals in a kitchen.

The story above was in the NY times a few years back.

Re:Added benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46725463)

Owner: Of course there's a cat in the restaurant, if I can't have him here how would you suggest I handle the rats?

Inspectors close restaurant. Exeunt

And here's a restaurant in NYC making do without cats [youtube.com] .

Re:Added benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46725481)

That's because the rest of the world doesn't have an agrifood industry designed to make the worst products possible in the largest volume possible.

Most other countries don't have overcrowded livestock standing around in its own filth being pumped with antibiotics and hormones to make them appear like higher quality food than it actually is.

Re:Added benefit (1)

serviscope_minor (664417) | about 8 months ago | (#46725521)

Of course there's a cat in the restaurant, if I can't have him here how would you suggest I handle the rats?

Well, yeah that is completely rediculous. It's New York, there's no way of controlling the rats.

Re:Added benefit (1)

gnick (1211984) | about 8 months ago | (#46726055)

The funny thing is, living in Europe, and then living in Asia I can tell you most of the world does not have the same very very high standards of the US

I'm not sure where you are (I'm in New Mexico, where you can find questionable food all over - Some of it delicious.) When in Vienna a little over 12 years ago, they'd just gotten their first McDonald's. It took YEARS to get approved to open and eventually reached an agreement - They could open, but had to post signs at the entrance in (at least 3 - I'm thinking German, English, French) several languages that said "The beef served in this establishment does not meet Austrian standards for human consumption." You'd think that would dissuade people who turn their noses up at bakeries who only bake once or twice a day, but the line was around the block.

My Laotian relatives regularly ingest unprocessed cow blood (for special occasions) without consequences and, if the infomercials I saw as a kid are to be believed, Ethiopians will happily stab their siblings for a rotten lima bean. Everything's relative.

People around here seem to love menudo, but I can't swallow that tripe.

Re:Added benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724389)

Has anyone else noticed there has been an increase in the amount to Pro-Glass propaganda recently?

it would be interesting to see how much google spent on the PR company handling this, but why waste time following the money trail when we can guess where it goes.

Re:Added benefit (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about 8 months ago | (#46724469)

...until someone beats you up for staring at them, thinking you're recording them.

Re:Added benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46725607)

Excellent service in the sense of being very politely asked to take them off or leave, yes.

Hey Hey! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46723913)

Another Google technology turned into a surveillance tool! Who would have guessed?

It's a great idea. (4, Insightful)

dclozier (1002772) | about 8 months ago | (#46723917)

The best way to keep inspectors from looking the other way for cash under the table is to be able to see when they're looking the other way. This also protects the restaurant owners too since the inspector can't threaten them over something imaginary because it will have to be on the video recording to back up their statements.

won't stop fraud_just use regular video cam (1)

globaljustin (574257) | about 8 months ago | (#46724091)

The best way to keep inspectors from looking the other way for cash under the table is to be able to see when they're looking the other way.

what?

google glass won't keep...um...people from bribing each other...they can just exchange the money at another time

it's good in a way that techies are so naive when it comes to criminality

this whole thing was some hot idea by some "product development" person who knows absolutely nothing about the **actual task**

yes...they could use **any kind of video camera**...including the old fashioned kind not strapped to your face

Re:won't stop fraud_just use regular video cam (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724143)

google glass won't keep...um...people from bribing each other...they can just exchange the money at another time

There's two parts to a bribe- transferring the money (which you addressed), and actually doing what you're being bribed to do. If the inspection is recorded, the inspector can't ignore problems that he sees. I suppose he could deliberately not look in places he knows there are problems, but then the (recorded) inspection would be incomplete.

Re:won't stop fraud_just use regular video cam (1)

zlives (2009072) | about 8 months ago | (#46726535)

if only we had the technology before google glass came along to make this possible... owait, i just read the heading

Re:won't stop fraud_just use regular video cam (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46727397)

A video camera can be aimed in a different direction than the inspector is looking.

Captcha: safety

Re:won't stop fraud_just use regular video cam (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | about 8 months ago | (#46727963)

They COULD use any kind of camera... if they wanted to be bothered with constantly holding and pointing it in the right direction instead of, you know, just looking where they're looking.

Huh? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46723919)

The bill does not mention Google Glass. Also, their price target for the head mounted cameras is $200. The article is just inserting Glass in as an advertisement.

Watcher watching (1)

rmdingler (1955220) | about 8 months ago | (#46723971)

Saw that too. I'll wager Google will provide the initial sixteen glasses for the publicity.

If this takes off, law enforcement personnel might be wearing of them soon... the cars are already set up for recording with dash cams.

Re:Watcher watching (2)

Travis Mansbridge (830557) | about 8 months ago | (#46724097)

Everyone seems to be operating under the impression that Glass can record continuously. As I've seen, it can't be doing much of anything for longer than a minute or two at a time without running the battery down, and recording video is exceptionally intensive, causing the device to become quite warm after a matter of seconds.

Prototype (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724683)

Everyone seems to be operating under the impression that Glass can record continuously. As I've seen, it can't be doing much of anything for longer than a minute or two at a time without running the battery down, and recording video is exceptionally intensive, causing the device to become quite warm after a matter of seconds.

Isn't that the prototype or Beta version? Now, if the production version is like that, then I can see the concern - especially for any sort of enforcement activities.

Why not just use a video camera? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46723927)

They have solved this problem, it's called a camcorder.

Re:Why not just use a video camera? (1)

hawguy (1600213) | about 8 months ago | (#46726041)

They have solved this problem, it's called a camcorder.

I was thinking the same thing -- they can use a GoPro if they want something rugged, and with a handheld camera the inspector doesn't have to lay down on the floor to shoot footage of the filth underneath the stove.

Re:Why not just use a video camera? (1)

mythosaz (572040) | about 8 months ago | (#46727821)

...which is exactly what they're considering.

The title is sensationalist bullshit. The health inspectors are considering recording their inspections, and as such, are considering devices to do recordings from the inspector's view. One device that can record POV inspections is Google Glass. Ergo: "ZOMG! Health inspectors considering using Google Glass!!11!one!!"

Sounds pretty awesome imho. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46723937)

Most if not all of these kinds of inspections are ripe for abuse by corrupt personnel. It would make trials and appeals so much easier to decide upon and "coloring" of ocular reports less likely.

Much maligned Google goggles (5, Insightful)

sunderland56 (621843) | about 8 months ago | (#46723965)

"the much-maligned Google goggles"

They aren't maligned as a working tool; they're maligned as a geek toy.

Wearing a welding helmet while welding? OK. Wearing a welding helmet to the local bar? Expect some ridicule.

Re:Much maligned Google goggles (0)

fermion (181285) | about 8 months ago | (#46724177)

I would hate any municipality t waste $1500 on a such an untested device. The lack of usefulness and high price point of this product is indicated by the fact that, as far as I can tell, anyone who applies to the explorer program gets in. I sent an application a while back, just saying I was going to play with them, and I got an offer. I did not know that they cost more than my first car. Now of course they have a "sale", where apparently anyone can buy the glasses for the low, low price of $1500.

Re:Much maligned Google goggles (1)

bickerdyke (670000) | about 8 months ago | (#46724929)

Espescially with eywear-mounted cameras available as low as $40!

welding helmet in a bar? (2)

oneiros27 (46144) | about 8 months ago | (#46724945)

Wearing a welding helmet to the local bar? Expect some ridicule.

What? Imagine the possibilities for pickup lines!

"You're so hot, I have to wear ANSI Z87.1 compliant eye protection"

Re:welding helmet in a bar? (1)

Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) | about 8 months ago | (#46726633)

"You're so hot, I have to wear ANSI Z87.1 compliant eye protection"

I would sleep with any girl who used that line on me.

Re:welding helmet in a bar? (1)

mythosaz (572040) | about 8 months ago | (#46727837)

I would sleep with any girl.

FTFY.

I keeed, I keeed...

Re:welding helmet in a bar? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46727865)

You would sleep with any girl that used any line on you.

Including "Go away, you creep!".

Re:Much maligned Google goggles (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 8 months ago | (#46725017)

It's a self fulfilling malignment: they were maligned in the summary. QED!

In seriousness, google glass is taking a lot of flak in terms of "I can't believe you're recording me! Privacy!" Annoyingly, this outrage is not directed at privacy issues that matter, like companies requiring your SSN for anything besides giving you social security benefits, or CCTVs everywhere, or the NSA. Google glass is maligned by people who want to act like they care about privacy but who can't be bothered to think about it much.

The system in NYC is so worthless anyway... (4, Insightful)

Bourdain (683477) | about 8 months ago | (#46723977)

...as someone who has scoured and mined the NYC health department data (not to mention the review / grade pending period making the data even more worthless; i.e., most restaurants receive a hidden "C" at which point they display a "Grade Pending" sign then have a month to get their "A" at their reinspection and then most likely go back to their "C" ways --> to all those statisticians out there, which rating is the real one? the first one when they weren't expecting it or the one where they had a few weeks notice?

My hope and wish is that the letter grades determined by the score would be meaningfully correlated to the risk of food poisoning in the restaurant however there is little relationship between those things and that restaurants wouldn't have a chance to get a reinspection which clearly defeats the purpose of the test in the eyes of anyone with even the most minimal statistical/scientific education.

Instead of using google glass, the health department should reevaluate their methods of inspection and reinspection grading policy where part of their inspection relates to testing actual prepared food instead of seeing if a mouse or roach might have been on the floor (oftentimes they can just scurry in from the sidewalk and have zero impact on the food)

good points (1)

globaljustin (574257) | about 8 months ago | (#46724105)

thnx for an informed opinion

if Google Glass's product development people had half the sense you do about everyday tasks the rollout wouldn't be so awkward

one thing I'd add is that all the benefits these people taut of using Google Glass are actually benefits that can come from using **any video camera**

you dont need Google Glass to take video

Re:The system in NYC is so worthless anyway... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724149)

well, you certainly are FAR more knowledgeable about the situation than most, but aside from your complaints of the failure of the system itself, i find this is ONE use for google goggles that makes a certain amount of sense...
sounds like a very good way to 'record' and annotate their inspection process in a much easier method...
(in fact, as a general proposition, THAT type of job -building inspector, etc- would be a good application for this technology...)
i think they would be great for some JOBS like this, but i COMPLETELY understand the JUSTIFIED hate on 'normal' people wearing them around everywhere for no good reason other than they are too cool for school...
IT DOESN'T MATTER if the ultimate use or intention of the casual google goggler is totally benign, i do NOT want someone overtly or covertly recording me/mine when i'm out and about with the NORMAL EXPECTATION of effective anonymity in public...
AND to the 'well, you don't bitch about gummint and other security cameras in public spaces...' excuse-makers: YES, i DO in fact 'bitch' about that, but other than using a shotgun to blow them up, that would get me arrested for destroying gummint/private property, i don't have any choice or control over that situation...

Re:The system in NYC is so worthless anyway... (2)

alen (225700) | about 8 months ago | (#46724317)

and almost every A grade has 10 points of violations for nonsense like certificates not being displayed in the open or something similar. take those away from a C and you get a B which is mostly stuff like food not being kept at a warm or cold enough temperature because in some cases the food being served is not supposed to be overheated or over chilled.

Grade Pending means C (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46727641)

I thoguht everyone knew that "Grade Pending" means C. Many of the violations, though, are paperwork violations; I wish those were reported seperately. However, the missing piece is not the 1 month re-inspection, it's that after you get a C or lower, you should be on a monthly unannounced inspection, so that the manager is forced to permamently correct or go out of business. That, and the violations that are from the landlord, not the restaurant, should result in fines to the landlord. It's fucked up that the tenant gets fined for vioaltions by the landlord.

do you want a fresh liver with that? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46723985)

onions to cover the smell? a hymen? http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Life-Style/Health-Fitness/Health/Sex-via-lab-grown-***-as-joyous/articleshow/33608129.cms something to shed the lead underpants for

crying with joy (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724049)

who needs onions?

New Google Maps features (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724015)

Search for "clean restaurant in NYC [google.com] ", and get accurate results based on reviews by professional restaurant inspectors.

Find out how clean a restaurant's kitchen is with a glimpse into the kitchen: google kitchen view

Evidence they're looking at GG itself? (5, Informative)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about 8 months ago | (#46724131)

NYC eyes Google Glass for restaurant inspections

including, possibly, the much-maligned Google goggles

So if the city wanted to use Google Glass

I don't see any evidence that NYC is actually looking at Google Glass. For all the information in the article, they may have already discounted it. Perhaps they never even considered it.

In other words, made-up shit.

Re:Evidence they're looking at GG itself? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724347)

So, you don't believe there will be any Glasshole Inspectors?

Re:Evidence they're looking at GG itself? (2)

Useless (11387) | about 8 months ago | (#46724749)

Welcome to Dicedot. You'll get used to it.

Re:Evidence they're looking at GG itself? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46725791)

Exactly. If they want video recordings of inspections then why buy GG which has way more unnecessary features?

Quality lowers from a government official. (2)

jellomizer (103300) | about 8 months ago | (#46724213)

Did you ever notice that Police Dashboard cams seem to glitch out between the time they do the stop, and during an escalation. Then seems to be working when a bruised suspect finally hits the cop.

I expect the same thing...
You see a video of the inspector. Talking to the owner who is wearing a nice gold watch. Well lets take a look at that refrigerator, the display get very pixally the sound wavers and is hard to hear, then it finally comes back on, with the inspector well it looks good then shakes the guys hand with a tan line, while the inspectors is wearing a gold watch.

Re:Quality lowers from a government official. (3, Interesting)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about 8 months ago | (#46724339)

Did you ever notice that Police Dashboard cams seem to glitch out between the time they do the stop, and during an escalation. Then seems to be working when a bruised suspect finally hits the cop.

I expect the same thing...
You see a video of the inspector. Talking to the owner who is wearing a nice gold watch. Well lets take a look at that refrigerator, the display get very pixally the sound wavers and is hard to hear, then it finally comes back on, with the inspector well it looks good then shakes the guys hand with a tan line, while the inspectors is wearing a gold watch.

Actually, that doesn't happen as often as one might think and when it does, it goes against the police. One of the purposes of dash cams is to provide evidence that the officer did not beat the guy up.

Re:Quality lowers from a government official. (2)

bickerdyke (670000) | about 8 months ago | (#46724981)

Actually, that doesn't happen as often as one might think and when it does, it goes against the police. One of the purposes of dash cams is to provide evidence that the officer did not beat the guy up.

Except in L.A.?

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/... [slashdot.org]

Re:Quality lowers from a government official. (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about 8 months ago | (#46725683)

Actually, that doesn't happen as often as one might think and when it does, it goes against the police. One of the purposes of dash cams is to provide evidence that the officer did not beat the guy up.

Except in L.A.?

http://yro.slashdot.org/story/... [slashdot.org]

Your story is an example of what I am saying. If the camera feed isn't there, it works against the police, not in favor of them.

Re:Quality lowers from a government official. (1)

jellomizer (103300) | about 8 months ago | (#46726765)

But how much more trouble would they be in if they had hard evidence.

With a convenient technical glitch, there is at least the argument that they followed procedures. Vs. blind proof that they were abusive.

Re:Quality lowers from a government official. (1)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about 8 months ago | (#46727335)

But how much more trouble would they be in if they had hard evidence.

With a convenient technical glitch, there is at least the argument that they followed procedures. Vs. blind proof that they were abusive.

Exactly, without the cameras, its the person's word against the cops. If the person has bruises and said that he cop beat him and there is no camera to show that he wasn't beaten then it's harder to disprove excessive force. Or say the perpetrator picked the fight with the police officer, but there isn't a camera, again it's his word against theirs. In the old days, there were two officers in a patrol car to "validate" the story. But, because people sometimes lie for their partner and because of costs saving requirements, the camera often replaces the partner. Without the camera, there is nobody to back the officer's story.

Next, Police (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724241)

Restaurant inspectors are a good start. Next, we should require police to use them while on duty.

Completely over Engineered (1)

wisnoskij (1206448) | about 8 months ago | (#46724281)

For the simple task of a portable recorder, GG is a ridiculous choice.

Should do building inspection too (3, Interesting)

TheCarp (96830) | about 8 months ago | (#46724291)

Not in private homes, because I do think people deserve some amount of privacy in their home but, definitely for where the real corruption is: commercial buildings.

My wife's previous employer owned the building that their office was in. They tried to get a permit to build a roof deck and were blatantly extorted by the Boston city building inspector. They refused to pay, he denied them the permit.

Corruption is everywhere where people have power.

Invasion of Privacy? (1, Interesting)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | about 8 months ago | (#46724293)

Do the state laws on restaurant inspections in the State of New York provide for the recording of who frequents those restaurants? Since these video inspections are part of the public record AND pick up everywhere the inspector turns their head, it would seem that if passed, this legislation would amount to government surveillance that could then be searched under the freedom of information act. Or how long before law enforcement or the NSA start accessing these videos? Of course they will say if you don't have anything to hide, then you don't have anything to worry about. That may be, but it still doesn't mean this isn't a government approved invasion of privacy.

If you don't think your inspectors are actually inspecting, then tail them. If you don't think they are writing down all the violations, then send a second inspector. In short, define the problem and address it. Doing so doesn't involve recording everybody in the establishment.

Buy a decent camera (3, Insightful)

cgfsd (1238866) | about 8 months ago | (#46724345)

Instead of spending $1500, why don't they buy a decent camera with a flash for 1/10 of the cost.
Maybe throw in a tablet for $300 to help documentation.

The Glass sucks at low light conditions and high contrast conditions found in coolers and kitchens.
Using Glass sounds good, but common sense sounds even better.

Better Idea (1)

Mephistophocles (930357) | about 8 months ago | (#46724367)

Here's a proposal for a minor change in the legislation. If this law is all about protecting the consu--I mean citizen, and limiting abuses of the inspectors, providing an accurate record, etc, then instead of the inspectors wearing a recording device, how about requiring those being inspected to wear them instead? Same results, right? Surely the state inspectors won't have ANY problem whatsoever being recorded doing their jobs - if everything's so above board, then they have nothing to fear.

Re:Better Idea (1)

EvilSS (557649) | about 8 months ago | (#46725027)

Here's a proposal for a minor change in the legislation. If this law is all about protecting the consu--I mean citizen, and limiting abuses of the inspectors, providing an accurate record, etc, then instead of the inspectors wearing a recording device, how about requiring those being inspected to wear them instead? Same results, right? Surely the state inspectors won't have ANY problem whatsoever being recorded doing their jobs - if everything's so above board, then they have nothing to fear.

I think they idea here is that the video would pick up what the inspector sees (since it would be sitting on his/her face it would have the same POV). This way if there is a dispute the video can be used to clarify what was seen. I don't see a problem with the owner also creating his own video of the inspection, but I don't think it's fair to do what you say and force the owners to wear a camera during the inspection.

Re:Better Idea (1)

Mephistophocles (930357) | about 8 months ago | (#46725897)

Neither do I, IMHO the state doesn't really have any business forcing the owner to do anything. The idea was to make a point; there's no way the state would agree to independent oversight of their inspection practices since they don't give a flying #*&$ about safety; it's about revenue.

More government waste (1)

operagost (62405) | about 8 months ago | (#46724723)

I'm curious about these inspectors. Is it a requirement that they have no hands? Because we have these things called "video cameras" that they could carry to document their reports. They only need one hand to hold it, so NYC's 100% differently-abled health inspector quota could still be met.

Will there be a new slang term for inspectors? (1)

Richy_T (111409) | about 8 months ago | (#46724885)

"Dirty-glassholes"

As someone who has had food audits (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46724973)

I worked for a company that had regular surprise food audits on both prepared and non-prepared consumables. Probably over 100 visits in my experience. I would absolutely support recording these audits.

To discount most posts above, holding a camera with your hand is not feasible for most inspections. They also carry paperwork/a tablet to write things down and set it down repeatedly to open, touch, wipe and hold many, many things during an audit. To say a hand held camera is just a good is absurd and ignorant.

While I'm not endorsing 'Google Glass' specifically, a head mounted camera capable of recording audio and video of both the inspector, the audited, and what is seen and discussed would help both sides of the table. Often we would get results saying we were told something when we absolutely were not, or things were seen that also were not. Video and audio would help weed out bad auditors. It would also help with training when showing video of actual violations to the audited so things could be corrected.

I know people get in a huff when they read Google anything in a story, let along Google Glass, but this is a place where people who have to deal with this scenario would likely support it.

Inspectors' video devices (1)

PPH (736903) | about 8 months ago | (#46725215)

Also known as "rat cam".

GoPro (1)

jtara (133429) | about 8 months ago | (#46725317)

GoPro: a heck of a lot cheaper, higher resolution, good enough for the cops. Put it in some sort of clip, remove it from the clip for close-ups. Yes, it's dorky. But less dorky than Google Glass.

Coming to NY Italian Restaraunts (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 8 months ago | (#46725363)

Vegeta, what does the scouter say about his pasta level?

It's started (1)

koan (80826) | about 8 months ago | (#46726805)

I sated before that between now and a future of robots, there will be people outfitted with Glass like attachments for their jobs, no longer needing any education or even an understanding of the local language (thanks to an icon based language that will be the Worlds first true language everyone knows).
Simply take a human, attach Glass and let the computer tell them what to do and what to look for. A humans natural dexterity makes them a cheap extension of an AI, so before the robots comes the "controlled human".

What else are you going to do with 8 or 9 billion humans and no jobs? Fight wars?

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