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Google Foresees Ads On Your Refrigerator, Thermostat, and Glasses

Soulskill posted about 2 months ago | from the brought-to-you-by-melancholy dept.

Advertising 355

New submitter waspleg sends news of a letter Google sent to the Securities and Exchange Commission in which the tech giant laid out its vision of an ad-filled future. They wrote, "We expect the definition of “mobile” to continue to evolve as more and more “smart” devices gain traction in the market. For example, a few years from now, we and other companies could be serving ads and other content on refrigerators, car dashboards, thermostats, glasses, and watches, to name just a few possibilities. Our expectation is that users will be using our services and viewing our ads on an increasingly wide diversity of devices in the future, and thus our advertising systems are becoming increasingly device-agnostic."

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355 comments

Nope. (5, Insightful)

danomac (1032160) | about 2 months ago | (#47059485)

First thing I'd do is disable networking on these devices.

Re:Nope. (5, Funny)

NapalmV (1934294) | about 2 months ago | (#47059513)

Then you'll see only the same old built-in ads forever.

Re:Nope. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059525)

Well, for a small fee you could disable the ads.

Re:Nope. (3, Insightful)

danomac (1032160) | about 2 months ago | (#47059549)

Just render the ad screen unusable. Why the hell do appliances (especially a fridge) need a screen for? Oh, wait - they want us to buy a fridge every few years because of course the fridge won't work without an operative screen.

Re:Nope. (5, Funny)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 2 months ago | (#47059701)

Just render the ad screen unusable. Why the hell do appliances (especially a fridge) need a screen for?

Exactly! The first time I saw ads on my new TV set, I smashed the screen with a baseball bat. Since then, problem solved. No more ads!

The programs suck though...

Re:Nope. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059877)

What are you talking about, Shattered Glass is the best program on right now. its so dynamic and draws you in. plus the 3D is amazing, you can feel that broken glass as well.

Re:Nope. (1)

retchdog (1319261) | about 2 months ago | (#47059993)

eh, it was okay [wikipedia.org] , but probably not the best. did they do a 3-d remake? what channel is it on?

Re:Nope. (4, Insightful)

BasilBrush (643681) | about 2 months ago | (#47059753)

What does a printer need a screen for? Printers used to get by with maybe 3 LEDs for status. Anything more than that was given as status on the computer it was connected to, providing you had more than a basic driver.

But now, the cheapest sub $50 printers have screens built in. (And a scanner too)

Screens have got so cheap, there's no reason not to include them in cheap devices, if they can come up with the slightest excuse. A consumer might chose the device with the screen over one without if there's little difference in price.

And in Google's dystopia, the ones with screens could actually be cheaper, subsidised by the advertising.

The excuse they'll use to market fridges with screens will probably be some connection to home shopping. Finish the milk? Show the barcode to the built in camera, and the screen will offer the option to order another.

The camera would be more of a cause for concern, given that people aren't always dressed in the kitchen. Especially given today's news that LG are spying on consumers with their smart-TVs.

Re:Nope. (4, Funny)

Burdell (228580) | about 2 months ago | (#47059841)

What does a printer need a screen for?

How else will it tell you "PC LOAD LETTER"?

Re:Nope. (4, Informative)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 2 months ago | (#47059959)

Or "Cyan toner low", or "Fuser needs replacement" or any number of other status outputs. Or to make setting the IP address parameters easier. Or to display help to the newb user who needs to change a toner but doesn't know how.

Simple stupid inkjets plugged into one computer don't necessarily need a screen, but a good networked one does.

Re:Nope. (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | about 2 months ago | (#47060011)

How else will it tell you "PC LOAD LETTER"?

Exactly. Printers have had LCD readouts since around 1990, give or take. Or about 25 years.

If one tried to show me an ad, though (or even suggested it might) then that is a NEGATIVE "feature" and I would not buy it.

A refrigerator really DOESN'T need a screen. Until they become intelligent enough to know that you're getting low on eggs or whatever. And that's not today.

A thermostat doesn't need an internet connection. Google acquired NEST and plans to use it (they said so) to gather more consumer information.

Scratch NEST off my list.

Etc.

Re:Nope. (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 2 months ago | (#47059909)

The excuse they'll use to market fridges with screens will probably be some connection to home shopping.

No, it will be for status and control settings. And that's why the idea of putting tape over the screen will not be popular.

Re:Nope. (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47059961)

So I can make changes to the setting from the printer instead of my computer?

Re:Nope. (4, Insightful)

mlts (1038732) | about 2 months ago | (#47059885)

Even better, buy a fridge that doesn't have a screen. Kitchen appliances are going on 60 years without requiring screens, Internet connectivity, or some companies to push ads to them for basic functioning. We don't need them now.

If one wants to pay for a better refrigerator, doesn't mind venting it, and has either propane or natural gas, buy a two-way (gas/electric) fridge. That way, your stuff stays cold even if there is a multi-day power outage. That is far more useful in the long run than any electronic doodads. If one really wants a screen on the fridge, a low-end Android tablet is a couple C-notes, and $5 gets you a roll of double-sided tape.

Re:Nope. (1)

JRV31 (2962911) | about 2 months ago | (#47060039)

A new use is found for duct tape every day.

Re:Nope. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059579)

scriiiiiiiiiiiiiitccchhh duck tape to the rescue! Is there anything that stuff cant do :)

Re:Nope. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059565)

Oh noes. You don't see that rosy future when your fridge orders the consumes items by itself and then reports to Google ?
What kind of backward attitude is that ?

Re:Nope. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059651)

First thing I'd do is disable networking on these devices.

At first thought, that sounds like a good idea....
Then when think about it, in the context of a Nest thermostat, well that plan falls on it's face;
      1. The "smart" features require data only available via the network.
      2. The "remote" features require network access.

hm.... sounds like my new $250 "smart" device just became a brick, just because someone wants to show me f******g ads...
I want a refund! then I can put my peice o's**t, dumb thermostat back in place.

I knew Google fuck it up!

Re:Nope. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059671)

First thing I'd do is disable networking on these devices.

Cut the problem off at the source, I propose a massive drone strike on Google HQ.

Re:Nope. (4, Funny)

pr0fessor (1940368) | about 2 months ago | (#47060021)

Your drone strike will start after this brief advertisement.

What is it then? (4, Funny)

SuperKendall (25149) | about 2 months ago | (#47059675)

What is Glass with networking disabled? Just a device to trick people into punching you for no reason?

Re:What is it then? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059697)

You deserve it!

Re:What is it then? (4, Funny)

lgw (121541) | about 2 months ago | (#47059789)

I was with you up to "no reason".

Re:What is it then? (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 2 months ago | (#47059903)

My kingdom for a mod point!

Re:Nope. (1)

maccodemonkey (1438585) | about 2 months ago | (#47059957)

First thing I'd do is disable networking on these devices.

Something like Google's Nest becomes mostly useless without networking.

At that point, why even buy the Google product?

Impossible (5, Funny)

PvtVoid (1252388) | about 2 months ago | (#47059499)

I have Adblock on my refrigerator.

Re:Impossible (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059663)

I have Adblock on my refrigerator.

Well, it is probably running Android, so no Adblock for you..

Re:Impossible (1)

dc29A (636871) | about 2 months ago | (#47059719)

Easy. [privoxy.org]

Re:Impossible (1)

PvtVoid (1252388) | about 2 months ago | (#47060027)

Easy. [privoxy.org]

Or use dnsmasq [adafruit.com] .

a future filled with black tape (4, Funny)

rogoshen1 (2922505) | about 2 months ago | (#47059523)

I foresee a future in which black tape or other opaque adhesive objects will be used to blot out the ads. Maybe I should get a patent..

"a device which obscures the user from seeing mind-numbing and intrusive advertising on products which have already purchased"

Google can shove their ad-laden future straight up their collective asses.

Re:a future filled with black tape (3, Insightful)

i kan reed (749298) | about 2 months ago | (#47059539)

Wait until they scan your behavior and lower the temperature until you remove the black tape.

Re:a future filled with black tape (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059843)

Wait until I start selling thermostats without ads.

Seriously, they're about as dirt simple as you can make something. Look inside your furnace, and there's a terminal block. Hooked to that terminal block is a multi-conductor cable, usually an 18/4 without ground. The conductors should be black, green, and two other colors. Here's the commonly accepted color code for each of them:

- Black: common, hot, probably 24VAC. Use a multimeter to test this before making any further assumptions.
- Green: fan control, on/off, probably drives a relay with a coil matching the voltage you find on the black wire.
- White: DX cooling (DX = direct expansion, a.k.a. "air conditioning"), on/off, drives a relay similar to the fan control one.
- Yellow: Gas heating. If your furnace isn't a gas furnace, you shouldn't have a yellow wire. Otherwise, this drives an on/off through to an in-line gas solenoid valve.
- Blue: chilled water cooling. You probably don't have this, and if you do, all bets are off. It might be on/off, it might be 4-20mA, 0-10Vdc, or 2-10Vdc analog. Get a professional HVAC controls guy to help you with this one.
- Red: electric heating. This only applies if you have an electric forced-air furnace. It's on/off, probably through a relay, to the coil controller.

Sometimes blue/red are used for second stages of white/yellow (respectively), and vice versa.

You need a thermistor, calibrated to a specific scale (10k-2 is good). You need a pot or two ("potentiometer", a.k.a. "rheostat" or "varistor", or just "volume knob" if you have some old stereo gear lying around that you don't mind stealing parts from) for setpoint controls. And you need a microcontroller monitoring the values of those inputs continuously in a tight loop. When the thermistor's temperature (from a lookup table) value crosses the setpoint value (+/-hysteresis to prevent short-cycling), you turn an appropriate set of outputs on or off. You could easily do it with an Arduino and some IDEC relays.

Google can lower the "temperature" all they want when their thermostat gets diked out of the circuit and can no longer do jack or shit to my furnace.

The bad news is, people will fall for this. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059533)

My dad bought a 60-inch Panasonic TV not all that long ago. It automatically connects to the internet, and serves ads at several points during routine operation - one during power-on, one whenever the volume is changed, and one during the "change input" screen.

I've told him I can turn the ads off (you just disable Viera Connect and they go away) but he won't have any part of it.

Re:The bad news is, people will fall for this. (1)

fche (36607) | about 2 months ago | (#47059613)

Back when I was a mere tike, viewing TV with the family, I was struck at just how attached my parents were to the advertisements. They would not tolerate something as mild as lowering the volume; they would obediently stare at & absorb that mental trash. I can easily imagine your scene playing out in their living rooms today.

Re:The bad news is, people will fall for this. (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47059989)

really? sheesh. In 1975 I built a device that shut the volume off the TV is the gain got too high. My parents loved it. Never did get find all the screws afterwords.

I should have patented it, but what do 11 year olds know?

Re:The bad news is, people will fall for this. (2)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 2 months ago | (#47059829)

I've told him I can turn the ads off (you just disable Viera Connect and they go away) but he won't have any part of it.

Last night I was on a United flight with the fancy new DirectTV in-seat entertainment system. The one that costs $8 for any flight over 2 hours. The one that has absolutely NO free entertainment options, not even the "From the Cockpit" audio that United hypes. The one that couldn't be turned off until after takeoff, and then turned itself back on at apparently random times.

All it had, for those who didn't pay, was endless ads trying to get people to pay, and some ads trying to sell ads on the system.

And some people spent the entire four hour flight in a darkened cabin with this glowing LCD playing advertising a foot away from their faces. Simply incomprehensible.

Re:The bad news is, people will fall for this. (1)

fche (36607) | about 2 months ago | (#47060009)

Carry electrical tape, adhere improvised cover to screen. Problem solved.

news at 11. (1)

retchdog (1319261) | about 2 months ago | (#47059547)

Publicly-traded technical advertising company announces expectation of profit in advertising on tech devices. Stop the presses.

Re:news at 11. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059595)

Publicly-traded technical advertising company announces expectation of profit in advertising on tech devices. Stop the presses.

Much of Slashdot (and others) still seems to have a problem recognizing that Google is an advertising company. All their cool stuff is to support this core business.

Re:news at 11. (1)

retchdog (1319261) | about 2 months ago | (#47059805)

huh? their shareholders and regulators seem to understand just fine, as suggested by the cited SEC filing.

great...... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059555)

just what the world needs...more AD's almost as bad a flooding a supermarked with hundreds of rats and mice...

No. (2)

danomatika (1977210) | about 2 months ago | (#47059557)

No. Thank. You. Why is this now the default instead of delivering a device that just works without the internet?

If I keep an open mind, I can almost understand (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059563)

If my fridge is smart enough to know what's in it and learn my usage patterns for consuming items (milk for instance) maybe this could work. I guess I wouldn't mind if my local grocer gave me a coupon for $0.50 off milk directly on my fridge. Or maybe it could give me a recipe to try for dinner and a list of things to pick up at the store. Might help with the "What do you want for dinner tonight? I dunno, what do you want?" conversation that happens on a nightly basis.

Re:If I keep an open mind, I can almost understand (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059653)

Oh, sure - you see the awesome potential. Everyone here as /. just presumes that the camera in the fridge will be watching them violate themselves with vegetables and will worry about having dildo ads come up when the in-laws are over.

Re:If I keep an open mind, I can almost understand (2)

nospam007 (722110) | about 2 months ago | (#47059735)

"If my fridge is smart enough to know what's in it ... Might help with the "What do you want for dinner tonight? I dunno, what do you want?" conversation that happens on a nightly basis."

Remember, it's 'smart'.

"Open the door, Fridge!"
"I'm sorry, Dave, I can't do that. It's 2 o'clock in the morning, fatso, no ice-creme and Vodka for you!"

A different race to the bottom (4, Insightful)

Kardos (1348077) | about 2 months ago | (#47059571)

If adverts get that pervasive, the value of each one is going to decline substantially. If I see 40 adverts before breakfast, I can't possibly buy each and every one of the products. There's only so much disposable income. If this gets pushed out, it's going to be self defeating.

Re:A different race to the bottom (4, Insightful)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 2 months ago | (#47059669)

We passed that point decades ago.

Re:A different race to the bottom (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 2 months ago | (#47060045)

If adverts get that pervasive, the value of each one is going to decline substantially. If I see 40 adverts before breakfast, I can't possibly buy each and every one of the products.

The purpose of most advertising (infomercials and other "call now" ads excepted) is not to get you to immediately pick up the phone and buy. It's to keep the name in your mind so when you do make a buying decision you'll be influenced. Nobody runs out and buys a Twix when they see the Twix left/right ads, but when they are in the store and the see a Twix display, they remember "those are the ones with the cute ads, maybe I'll try one."

If this gets pushed out, it's going to be self defeating.

No, it will be a feeding frenzy as everyone jumps on the bandwagon to compete against the others. Most people won't think "these are the idiots who advertise on my toaster display", they're going to remember the name and it will become familiar. That's the basis for the saying that "all press is good press as long as they spell your name right."

Aaarrgh! (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | about 2 months ago | (#47059587)

The ads! I can't get them out of my head! Even when I close my eyes they're there! Why did I buy Google Contact Lenses?!?

The Internet of Things (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059589)

Here we go, here's the real reason for the internet of things, not to benefit consumers in any way, but to pollute their visual environment with ads.

Re:The Internet of Things (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059741)

Here we go, here's the real reason for the internet of things, not to benefit consumers in any way, but to pollute their visual environment with ads.

This is the reason for the Google version of the internet of things. Others have different (eg. non-ad dominated) business models.

It looks like you're about to have sex! (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059601)

Would you like me to order some cigarettes and a pregnancy test for you?

What part of such a hideous future.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059603)

isn't evil? Pointless complexity on multiple devices in order to annoy the 'purchaser'. Even a free fridge that played the Depends jingle every morning would be too costly; now imagine a kitchen that sounds like people arguing 24/7.

And I foresee using less Google (1, Offtopic)

nicholas22 (1945330) | about 2 months ago | (#47059607)

'Nuff said!

Re:And I foresee using less Google (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 2 months ago | (#47059773)

I started moving away from Google about a year ago for this very reason.

My work email is still a Google Apps for Education based, since our university basically wants everyone either there or on Microsoft's cloud (which UW has managed to muck up, so it's not a great option). But my personal email is not. I do miss Google's spam filtering, which is darn good; but using an email client again has made me realize just how mediocre Gmail's interface is overall.

Totally off topic but... (1)

Lab Rat Jason (2495638) | about 2 months ago | (#47060051)

.... the username 'Escort Wagon' painted a picture in my head that had nothing to do with cars. I'm still smiling about it. Thanks for that.

How about 'aww hell no'? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 2 months ago | (#47059609)

It's going to take a very compelling 'smart' feature to make applying the protocol currently used for the blinding-eyeburner-superbright blue LEDs that manufacturers insist on sticking everywhere to the hypothetical screens that will be displaying ads everywhere.

Between electrical tape, spraypaint, and maybe a bit of glass etching (when more polite flavors of disconnecting or firmware modification don't suffice) I see no reason for anything that doesn't need a screen to remain equipped with one.

better question... (5, Interesting)

Connie_Lingus (317691) | about 2 months ago | (#47059623)

...would you be willing to receive a brand new $2000 frig/freezer for free IF it showed ads on it?

that's the real issue...i think alot of people would...hell I probably would.

Re:better question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059787)

There isn't a single fridge out there that is actually "worth" $2000.00 anyways. They are all just complete and total garbage.

This all spawns from the Nest purchase. Why wouldn't you want to hear about ads from Lennox if it is blazing hot outside and you already have an air conditions??!!

Re:better question... (1)

Cro Magnon (467622) | about 2 months ago | (#47059813)

A lot depends on the ads. I got a reduced price on my Kindle with ads, and I have no problem with them. OTOH, if they were anything like TV ads, or the more annoying internet ads, I'd gladly pay the $2K to get rid of them.

Re:better question... (3, Insightful)

ggraham412 (1492023) | about 2 months ago | (#47059833)

If enough people do take that tradeoff, eventually you won't ever be able to buy an ad free Fridge for $2000 because they'll stop making them.

Re:better question... (1)

Gibgezr (2025238) | about 2 months ago | (#47059845)

We have a winner! Because I can't see anyone paying big bucks for a fridge that annoys the crap out of them.

Re:better question... (1)

kruach aum (1934852) | about 2 months ago | (#47059907)

Of course, how hard would it to paste a piece of cardboard over the display (in case the user interface is only accessible from the screen ads are shown on, instead of, say, paint) and tear out the speakers? Now you've got a free refrigerator.

Re:better question... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059917)

Like Google, you failed to mention the OTHER part of the deal. It does not simply display ads. It does some spying too. Are you still interested if that freezer did spying on you? You don't get to know how much, what kind, when, etc. Its spying capabilities will be upgraded as long as you use it because that part is controlled by Google and not you. Still interested?

Re:better question... (1)

rfrenzob (163001) | about 2 months ago | (#47059947)

Is this one of those new fancy fridges that won't open until you have watched the required number of ads?

Quick fix ad hacks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059625)

"we and other companies could be serving ads and other content on refrigerators, car dashboards, thermostats, glasses, and watches, to name just a few possibilities"

Nothing a little paint can't fix on the fridge. As for the watch, analog all the way. Glasses, better not be RX glasses and wooden cups will be the new cool. Dashboards on cars can be a distraction and I'd hope would be fought tooth and nail against. Thermostats can be given the black cloth treatment.

It's Time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059645)

For adblock to do an IPO

Re:It's Time (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059891)

For adblock to do an IPO

As Google is blocking AdBlock on Android, which all of these devices will use, not really..

FG (1, Insightful)

AndyKron (937105) | about 2 months ago | (#47059655)

Do no evil? FUCK GOOGLE

Re:FG (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059995)

Google. Almost worst then Beta.

Re:FG (1)

geekoid (135745) | about 2 months ago | (#47060071)

Please explain how recognizing where the market is going and telling the SEC is evil?

Just one detail they've overlooked (1)

Karl Cocknozzle (514413) | about 2 months ago | (#47059659)

As far as the automotive portion of this, they've overlooked a pretty critical detail: With the exception of navigation and car-control, the driver cannot be in a position to view moving video or flashy graphics--it's explicitly illegal to design a car in such a way that such garish distraction could catch the driver's eye at a critical moment.

As for the rest: I know of few people that would do anything other than smash the screen out of a refrigerator that was blaring ads at them every time they walked past (since what's the point of showing ads when the door is opened and, presumably, the "screen" is facing away from the person you're trying to show an ad to?) so I imagine that's going to cut-down on their response-rate on those ads.

In short, I'm fucking laughing thinking about how disappointed they're likely to be. Humans are already on advertising overload--it was 5,000 impressions per day per person TWENTY YEARS AGO, before the Internet even existed. I can't even guesstimate how much ad-crap we see now... Probably a fair-bit more than 5,000 impressions per day, though.

Re:Just one detail they've overlooked (1)

jcochran (309950) | about 2 months ago | (#47059937)

As far as the automotive portion of this, they've overlooked a pretty critical detail: With the exception of navigation and car-control, the driver cannot be in a position to view moving video or flashy graphics--it's explicitly illegal to design a car in such a way that such garish distraction could catch the driver's eye at a critical moment.

And now the reason for the autonomous car research by Google is revealed. Somehow, I suspect that the laws prohibiting moving video and flashy graphics will go away, or stop being enforced once autonomous vehicles are common place.

Re:Just one detail they've overlooked (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059983)

As far as the automotive portion of this, they've overlooked a pretty critical detail: With the exception of navigation and car-control, the driver cannot be in a position to view moving video or flashy graphics--it's explicitly illegal to design a car in such a way that such garish distraction could catch the driver's eye at a critical moment.

As for the rest: I know of few people that would do anything other than smash the screen out of a refrigerator that was blaring ads at them every time they walked past (since what's the point of showing ads when the door is opened and, presumably, the "screen" is facing away from the person you're trying to show an ad to?) so I imagine that's going to cut-down on their response-rate on those ads.

In short, I'm fucking laughing thinking about how disappointed they're likely to be. Humans are already on advertising overload--it was 5,000 impressions per day per person TWENTY YEARS AGO, before the Internet even existed. I can't even guesstimate how much ad-crap we see now... Probably a fair-bit more than 5,000 impressions per day, though.

And it is still working. As for the car, what about the car navigation voice telling you that you are nearing a burger drive-thru because it knows its time for you to be hungry again (it also know that you likely are hungover from activities day before and your Google searches...) and that you love your burgers..

Futurama (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059665)

Leela: Didn't you have ads in the 21st century?

Fry: Well sure, but not in our dreams. Only on TV and radio, and in magazines, and movies, and at ball games... and on buses and milk cartons and t-shirts, and bananas and written on the sky. But not in dreams, no siree.

IF (1)

Zexter (1704006) | about 2 months ago | (#47059681)

The software is opensource, then I have no problem with the ads. Shit, they could probably GIVE AWAY refrigerators and still make tons of money through the ads.

I foresse a world (3, Interesting)

gurps_npc (621217) | about 2 months ago | (#47059691)

where people burn the Google campus to the ground and spit on it's grave.

Yes, I see where they would want that.

Yes, I see how looking at facebook et al. makes people think that privacy is dead.

I also realize that we are still in the infancy of the internet revolution and you can't project current uses forward, but instead must realize that the tide will turn against them.

We are currently in the pre-OSHA stage of the Internet Revolution.

Just as people had to fight for safety and work limits during the industrial revolution, we will end up stopping people from abusing our privacy. It just takes a little bit of time for the regulations to catch up.

Does Google also forsee (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059695)

subsidizing my internet bandwidth and electricity bills for all these ads they want to continuously display?

It could be worse... (1)

The Altruist (1448701) | about 2 months ago | (#47059705)

Me: *digging in fridge looking for a midnight snack*
MS Clippy: Uh oh! It looks like you're about to go off your diet again! Would you like help with that?

They over estimate my desire... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059715)

to bring their junk into my home. I

Colonoscopy (1)

PPH (736903) | about 2 months ago | (#47059737)

n/t

F*** google (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059767)

I will rip the fing screen off the fridge with my bare hands if I have to. We have done really well getting rid of the sickness that is advertisement. We don't watch tv and at all times we have adblockers on the computers. (except the ipad which I refuse to use for web browsing)

The only things left are ads on billboards and music radio station ads... we just turn it off when the ads come on. Mostly we stick to npr otherwise.

New! (1)

msobkow (48369) | about 2 months ago | (#47059775)

New! Google Watch!

It can't tell you the time, but it monitors everything you do.

What if Google partners with Airlines (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059815)

The most intrusive ads for me are already the airlines ads played on the seatback screen two feet in front of your face.
Imagine if Google would display helpful ads based on your itinerary. The flights to Vegas could become very interesting...

Then google can f**k off (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059819)

I won't be buying their products then

Just fuck you, google (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059823)

Btw, do they also foresee the number of glassholes' noses that are currently being broken worldwide on a daily basis? No joke, every day there's a new story. And hopefully many more.

Mike Judge is a prophet (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059839)

Just watch Idiocracy

Re:Mike Judge is a prophet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059873)

Idiocracy is supposed to be funny because the sheer absurdity of it all.

It is not so funny anymore.

Re:Mike Judge is a prophet (1)

avandesande (143899) | about 2 months ago | (#47060053)

I took it as the natural progression of current trends.. more of a commentary on current society.

if is free. (1)

guantamanera (751262) | about 2 months ago | (#47059847)

If they give the appliances and car for free then I can see myself allowing advertising to some point.

Does anyone look at ads anyway? (1)

dak664 (1992350) | about 2 months ago | (#47059875)

I have script and ad blocks and bogus host file entries to speed up browsing but can honestly say I don't pay attention to ads when they get through, When looking for something to buy I do the search and find it hard to believe unsolicited ads bring in any customers.

Are there really people who click through and buy something because an ad says they need it?

The more they advertise, the more I ignore (4, Insightful)

ewibble (1655195) | about 2 months ago | (#47059889)

I think advertisers are shooting themselves in the foot with this, I have recently noticed just don't believe a word any of them say anymore, Its like I am building up an immunity to them, and they need to create bigger and bigger lies, ops I mean deceptions.

Before I saw a sale advertised as "Demolition", I went in and it was 10% off, well I could negotiate that any time, hardly a demolition sale, now I just don't even bother going in. If I need something I go in sure, but I don't go in because of a sale or stated discount, because they are so likely to be lying that it is not even worth the effort step inside the shop to find out.

My daughter asked me how much I believed the advertisements on TV, and I said not at all, I then started paying attention to the ads and rating if I believed them, and if i thought they where using hiding some important fact from me. The answer was unless it was a public service ad where they where not trying to sell me something, like don't speed, I didn't believe them at all. And even public service advertisements I think they are fudging the truth in order for them to get me to do what they think is best for me.

What we need to do is start charging to be advertised to, I think this specifically applies to junk mail, which goes directly in the bin, since I have to pay to dispose of it.

Don't purchase (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47059905)

The solution is simple: don't purchase these types of devices. There is more than one supplier of refrigerators, thermostats, glasses, etc. These companies do not hold a monopoly in their respective markets.

For example: it is still possible to purchase a completely mechanically controlled refrigerator with a mechanical thermostat and defrost control (no keypads, no advanced CPU controls, no circuit boards to fail with the latest power surge) which still have a respectable low energy utilization. When you stop looking at the wiz-bang features and purchase items for what they actually do, the cost drops and these gimmicks don't exist.

I'm not saying advanced controls aren't helpful (some appliances need these advanced controls), just stop this design cycle where everyone races to the bottom (cheapest).

Take a closer look at the Nest thermostat (which Google just bought). For a device that is supposed to perform a simple climate control function and reduce energy usage when away, it does a rather piss-poor job of it (check out their own community forums, there are more than just a couple of users experiencing issues). Try it with a heat-pump with standard electric heat backup (fairly common) and look into their recovery algorithm (hint: IT SUCKS), almost every other competitor has been making thermostats for years that performs this basic control better.

It is amazing how many people will defend their devices/purchases, with all the latest features and cool factor, when the basic functions perform so horribly.

What! (3, Funny)

Stormy Dragon (800799) | about 2 months ago | (#47059981)

There's no way I'm going to accept advertising on my souvenir Iron Man 3 soda cup!

Social collapse at Google? (2)

Futurepower(R) (558542) | about 2 months ago | (#47060019)

In my opinion, Google seems to be degrading rapidly, along with the other social collapse happening in the U.S., documented in the book, The Unwinding: An Inner History of the New America [amazon.com] .

adblock plus! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47060047)

i forsee installing adblock plus on my refrigerator then..

Reminds me of the book Feed (1)

Causemos (165477) | about 2 months ago | (#47060059)

Surprising relevant

From Wikipedia:
Feed (2002) is a young adult science fiction novel written by M. T. (Matthew Tobin) Anderson. The novel focuses on issues such as corporate power, consumerism, information technology, data mining, and environmental decay, occasionally from a sardonic perspective. The novel depicts American society's descent into a culture that revolves entirely around advertising and corporate gain from the perspective of an American teenager and his friends.

http://www.amazon.com/Feed-M-T... [amazon.com]

a nightmarish sci-fi story predicted this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47060061)

Decades ago -- who was it who wrote that short story?

The only place anyone could hide from the damn ads was in prison, and the narrator's grandmother did something to get locked away, and when she explained why, the narrator thought, hmmmm, I bet I could sell ads into the prisons ...

At least with the prior art Google can't patent the idea.

we were warned (1)

DriveDog (822962) | about 2 months ago | (#47060069)

Reminds me of Idiocracy, Robocop, and a number of other films featuring dystopian futures.
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