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Hacking a Tesla Model S Could Net $10,000 Prize

timothy posted about 4 months ago | from the usb-port-under-the-gas-cap dept.

Transportation 77

cartechboy (2660665) writes "It seems there's a new hack challenge set every week, but this time, it seems different. A challenge has been thrown down to hack a Tesla Model S with a $10,000 prize. The organizers of a computer security conference have set the challenge and it's open to anyone that registers for the Syscan conference. Taking place in Beijing from July 16-17, the rules for the hack competition haven't been revealed yet but a Model S will be on display for hackers to try their luck on. It's important to note that Tesla itself isn't involved in the competition in any official capacity, nor does it support the competition. If successful, this wouldn't be the first time a Tesla Model S has been hacked. In that instance Tesla was quick to warn people that making changes in the Model S' software would immediately void the car's warranty. Given the car's high-tech nature, it's no shock Tesla's taking security seriously. With $10,000 on the line, it'll be interesting to see if anyone manages to crack the code."

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Cheap bastards (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47424807)

$10000? Do all security people work for that kind of money? Have some self-respect. An exploit for a software flaw in a luxury car is worth at least ten times that much.

Re:Cheap bastards (0)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 4 months ago | (#47424845)

10K + taxes / fees and the car is good pay.

Re:Cheap bastards (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47424925)

The prize is $10000, not the car.

Re:Cheap bastards (0)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 4 months ago | (#47424955)

Yes 10k is low but say 10K + the car is good pay for an security person.

Re:Cheap bastards (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47424991)

You do not get the car. Do you get that?

Re:Cheap bastards (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 4 months ago | (#47425103)

Possession is 9/10ths of the law. Not that familiar with China, but I'm pretty sure you could get it titled for less then it's worth.

Re:Cheap bastards (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47425251)

Possession is 9/10ths of the law.

People keep saying that, but it's entirely untrue.

It's illegal to be knowingly in possession of stolen goods.

You've been listening to your capitalist overlords too much.

There is NOTHING in law which says possession defines ownership, so why do you keep repeating this rubbish?

Re: Cheap bastards (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47427037)

Posesion is basicly ownership when there is no paperwork or evidence proving ownership otherwise.

Someone steals your garden gnome and puts it in their garden. You call the police. The other guy says its always been his. Neither of you have receipts.

You're not getting that gnome back.

Re:Cheap bastards (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 4 months ago | (#47432069)

You might have mistaken me for a god damn law abider.

Re:Cheap bastards (2)

Sable Drakon (831800) | about 4 months ago | (#47425027)

This isn't Pwn2Own. You do not get the car if you manage to hack into it.

Re:Cheap bastards (5, Insightful)

vux984 (928602) | about 4 months ago | (#47425041)

You do not get the car if you manage to hack into it.

I guess that depends how well he hacks it. :p

Re:Cheap bastards (1)

gweihir (88907) | about 4 months ago | (#47425329)

$10'000 gets you something like 4-5 consulting days from good security experts and that is with the $10'000 paid in every case. In that time you can only hack really bad security. Don't expect anybody good to even try this unless they are bored and not interested in the money.

This is a cheap stunt.

hacking can get you a death sentence there also (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 4 months ago | (#47424811)

hacking can get you a death sentence there also how much time will you for GTA??

There better be a waver that no one will be prosecuted and that you will not be on the hook for the full cost of the car if something go wrong

Re:hacking can get you a death sentence there also (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47426297)

That's only true when you're not hacking for the Chinese government.

Something missing from the summary (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47424823)

Recently a Tesla Model S was stolen from a dealership and destroyed, and they haven't figured out how the guy managed to do it. [freep.com]

Re:Something missing from the summary (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 4 months ago | (#47424885)

don't know why is split apart like that.

Re:Something missing from the summary (1)

Minwee (522556) | about 4 months ago | (#47425029)

It just might have had something to do with being involved in a high speed chase, smashing into several other vehicles and then finally hitting a large metal pole sideways.

While some popular US vehicles [google.com] might be able to drive away from that kind of collision, it seems that the Tesla model S isn't in the same league as far as survivability goes.

Re:Something missing from the summary (1)

fnj (64210) | about 4 months ago | (#47426407)

In 2013 the Tesla S scored a Vehicle Safety Score (VSS) better than any other [teslamotors.com] vehicle tested including every major make and model approved for sale in the US. It exceeded not only all other sedans, but all SUVs and minivans. In side pole intrusion, it was the only one scoring "good", night-and-day far better than the the Volvo S60.

If Roger Rodas had been driving a Tesla instead of a Porsche, maybe he and Paul Walker would still be alive. For one thing the car would not have burst into a raging inferno while Paul was stunned by the collision.

Re:Something missing from the summary (1)

hendrips (2722525) | about 4 months ago | (#47426735)

He was talking about an M1 Abrams tank. I have an exceptionally hard time believing that a Tesla is going to do better than a military tank when it comes to running into metal poles.

It helps to figure out if a poster is being facetious before you whip out a self-righteous reply.

Re:Something missing from the summary (1)

GNious (953874) | about 4 months ago | (#47430627)

I for one would love to see an M1 Abrams tank going sideways at high speed into metal poles...

Re:Something missing from the summary (1)

Dare nMc (468959) | about 4 months ago | (#47429459)

Although it would be interesting to know if the Tesla was braking when it crashed, Base model Porsche 911 stopping distance from 60 is 98 feet, the base Tesla is 150 feet. I haven't seen numbers for 100 to 0 on the Tesla, but in the 911 it is reported as 250 feet so I am guessing the Tesla base model is going to be over 400 feet (M*V*V, means 100mph is 3* more energy than 60mph). So if he had slammed on the brakes from 100mph, 200 feet before the crash, the tesla would have still been doing 70 at the crash, while had he stolen a porsche 911, he would have slowed from 100 to about 40 mph in the same 200 feet. (Although Tesla does offer a performance braking package that will stop from 60 in 120 feet, only 22% further than the Stock Porsche.)
So if were going to speculate had the thief stolen the better handling, better stopping Porsche, he probably wouldn't have even crashed in the first place.

Re:Something missing from the summary (2)

GrumpySteen (1250194) | about 4 months ago | (#47426291)

The Tesla S has a keyless ignition. The key just has to be in range of the vehicle and you can press the start button and take off, even the key isn't in the car with you. Only after you park the car will it refuse to go any further. All the guy had to do was get into the car and that's not that difficult even if the door is locked.

Tesla wants to examine the wreckage because it's an unusual accident and could provide insights into ways that they could improve the structure of the car, not because they can't figure out how someone started it and drove off.

Void warranty (4, Interesting)

js3 (319268) | about 4 months ago | (#47424827)

How is voiding the warranty threat show they are taking security seriously? Everyone puts a voids the warranty warning when they don't want you to see whats inside. IF someone hacks your car is the warranty still void?

Re:Void warranty (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 4 months ago | (#47424895)

They want to lock out 3rd party shops, jiffy lube, DIYer and make so all work is done at the dealer.

Re:Void warranty (1)

twistofsin (718250) | about 4 months ago | (#47424943)

Tesla doesn't have any dealerships. Any other theory?

Re:Void warranty (1)

Yebyen (59663) | about 4 months ago | (#47424979)

Service locations then...

http://www.teslamotors.com/ser... [teslamotors.com]

It looks like Tesla "ranger visit" is $100 per trip with the service plan, presumably since it's not explained on the page a "ranger" is someone who comes to you, like AAA, only Tesla.

Re:Void warranty (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47424997)

don't take it literally. you know he meant authorized maintenance shops.

Re:Void warranty (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47425229)

remember, people like him view Tesla as the second coming of their profit Jobs. If you are even slightly semantically incorrect, you're immediately an idiot and not worthy, regardless if "authorized maintenance partner" and "dealer" are basically the same thing when talking about getting your car fixed.

Re:Void warranty (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47424989)

Tesla has no dealers, dumbass.

Re:Void warranty (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47425127)

the dealer

Don't know much about how Tesla operates, now do you?

Your conspiracy theories are lacking in convincing evidence.

Re:Void warranty (1)

ericloewe (2129490) | about 4 months ago | (#47425235)

They're really pissed they can't replace the engine oil on the model S... Oh, wait...

Re:Void warranty (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47425385)

You know, this myth that EVs are magic cars that never need any more maintenance other than new tires has been debunked time and time again here. The Tesla, like every other EV I've ever seen does indeed have fluids and they do indeed have replacement schedules. Maintenance cycles don't suddenly disappear because you own an EV.

Re:Void warranty (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47425907)

I've never seen anyone repeat this "myth", except as a strawman. I doubt you have either.

Re:Void warranty (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47426513)

Really? [slashdot.org]

Re:Void warranty (1)

NormalVisual (565491) | about 4 months ago | (#47427995)

They also have ball joints, CV joints, tie rod ends, etc. that need grease just like any other car.

Re:Void warranty (1)

swillden (191260) | about 4 months ago | (#47428297)

I dunno.. my LEAF's maintenance schedule for the first 150K miles is pretty much "rotate tires, every 7500 miles, check brakes every 15,000". Checking the brakes, of course, involves checking the brake fluid levels, so there is a fluid. At 150K miles you do have to replace the oil used to cool the battery charger.

But, in general, EVs are very close to maintenance-free.

Re:Void warranty (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47435799)

"At 150K miles you do have to replace the oil used to cool the battery charger."

Why? In a traditional car, the oil looses its ability to lubricate. What exactly does the oil in a battery charger do after 150K?

Re:Void warranty (1)

swillden (191260) | about 4 months ago | (#47436359)

"At 150K miles you do have to replace the oil used to cool the battery charger."

Why? In a traditional car, the oil looses its ability to lubricate. What exactly does the oil in a battery charger do after 150K?

No idea.

Re:Void warranty (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 4 months ago | (#47425239)

They want to lock out 3rd party shops, jiffy lube, DIYer and make so all work is done at the dealer.

Jiffy Lube for your Tesla? What are they going to do to a Tesla? Change the oil and filter?

I don't care who you are, that there is funny...

Re:Void warranty (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 4 months ago | (#47425529)

Well, there's still transmission fluids, brake fluids, steering fluids, coolant fluids.

Re:Void warranty (1)

fnj (64210) | about 4 months ago | (#47426515)

Brake fluid, yeah. Coolant for the battery, yeah. Steering is electric so you lose there. The transmission has no gear change, so no synchro wear due to shifting. It does have gear oil - NOT "transmission fluid" (that's for automatics).

The gear oil is scheduled for change at 12 years / 250,000 km. Brake fluid and coolant once a year - that sounds incredibly conservative, but you have to understand this car could last you an AWFUL long time, so it doesn't make sense to push such paltry expenses.

Re:Void warranty (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 4 months ago | (#47426551)

If you think the guys at the local quickie lube place is going to know what to do with a Tesla, you are nuts. Most of those guys only have experience with changing oil and usually only for as long as they've worked there. You are lucky if they know "rightie tightie, leftie loosie" and don't cross thread the drain plug putting it back in.

I would suggest you just take it to Tesla and pay them the $600/year to do the maintenance you may need.. In the end it will be cheaper than fixing the mess the oil change places will cause you. If you can afford a Tesla, surely you can afford to keep it maintained...

Re:Void warranty (1)

NormalVisual (565491) | about 4 months ago | (#47428037)

Jiffy Lube for your Tesla? What are they going to do to a Tesla? Change the oil and filter?

I mentioned it in another thread, but the Tesla's front suspension really isn't any different than any other car, and needs grease like any other car. The components may be sealed - I don't know, but I would hope not. Sealed ball joints, tie rod ends, etc. tend to wear out faster than those with zerks that are properly maintained IME.

Re:Void warranty (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 4 months ago | (#47428275)

You cannot be serious....

Where a Tesla has similar components and designs as other cars, the front suspension is going to be totally different than 90% of other sedans it's size. The Tesla Model S is rear wheel drive, which is a departure from the normal front wheel drive for most other cars. I'm sure they omitted the CV joints/boots and half shafts from the front end. So, where the design may be classic, it's not all that common any more.

But more importantly, manufacturers have abandoned the use of grease fittings in most cars decades ago. They never got greased and everything fell apart faster. Not to mention that it is more convenient and maintenance free to have a sealed system. One could argue that sealed systems are less prone to wear because the dust and grit cannot get in and the grease cannot get out, but I'll skip making the obvious point. Go ahead and drill and insert grease fittings if it makes you feel better, just don't try to sell the car to me, I don't want a mess like that.

Re:Void warranty (1)

NormalVisual (565491) | about 4 months ago | (#47428641)

Where a Tesla has similar components and designs as other cars, the front suspension is going to be totally different than 90% of other sedans it's size.

Other than the lack of CV joints (I had thought the S was all-wheel drive, but you're correct on this point), what specifically is different regarding the front suspension? Does it not have upper/lower control arms and tie rod ends with joints that wear?

One could argue that sealed systems are less prone to wear because the dust and grit cannot get in and the grease cannot get out, but I'll skip making the obvious point.

You could argue it, but the worn (sealed) suspension parts in my '02 Sierra that I'm about to replace at 116K miles would tend to disagree with your statement (the joints in my '86 Silverado with twice the mileage are fine, but then they've been kept greased), as does the fact that almost everyone I've seen that did the replacement themselves replaces any sealed parts with greasable ones where they can. The Moog parts I'm replacing them with (which are far better than the factory parts) come with zerks - no drilling required. The worn ball joints and tie rod ends in my truck likely aren't dirty, but they *are* dry. Grease (even synthetic) doesn't last forever, and in a sealed system, once the grease wears out, the joint follows soon after and there's not anything you can do to prevent it. You're absolutely correct that most people with greasable parts don't follow the recommended maintenance schedule, and the sealed joints do last longer than an *unmaintained* part. They generally are also designed to be a royal PITA to replace (for ball joints, anyway), so most shops replace the entire control arm assembly at a much greater cost. They most definitely don't last longer than a properly maintained part with zerks though. Any decent 30-minute lube place should be taking care of anything with fittings anyway.

Re:Void warranty (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 4 months ago | (#47431521)

But my point that open systems require maintenance remains.... Manufacturers are not out to build things that last longer, just long enough, preferably without maintenance. 100K miles is way past the warranty running out and way past the point where the original owner has sold your average car and moved on. As a manufacturer, what would YOU do? Put something in that lasted forever but required maintenance every 3K miles or it wears out in short order, or go with the maintenance free option that usually makes it to 100K miles? To me, the choice is easy, you go with the reliable option that doesn't require maintenance. It's what your customer wants.

Re:Void warranty (1)

Kkloe (2751395) | about 4 months ago | (#47425129)

because things that are under warranty have to be replace by the seller, either by providing something that is the same or similiar, like a new model, or money, and you dont want to replace things as a seller because some shit head trimmed his motor until it breaks and wants compensation because he broke it

Re:Void warranty (1)

Neil Boekend (1854906) | about 4 months ago | (#47429697)

How is voiding the warranty threat show they are taking security seriously? Everyone puts a voids the warranty warning when they don't want you to see whats inside. IF someone hacks your car is the warranty still void?

That's like buying a nice and secure computer, installing Adobe Reader on it and complain to the manufacturer that it got hacked.
He didn't just look around. He installed Firefox. While FF is not as idiotic as Adobe's bloatware, it is still an entry vector. They warned him against that.
Of course Tesla is not responsible when you install a webbrowser on your car, go to some virus ridden site and have a problem. They could have prevented the installation, but they didn't. Instead they warned the idiot that what he was doing was idiotic and beyond their responsibility.

what happens if a failed hack bricks the firmware (0)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 4 months ago | (#47424831)

what happens if a failed hack bricks the firmware in a way that the next person / group can't do anything more when it is there trun?

also I don't thing there is a way to do a full reset after someones trun is over.

What will they do if one team does park of the hack and an other does the other part will there be a fight over who do what % and who should get paid?

Re:what happens if a failed hack bricks the firmwa (2)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 4 months ago | (#47424867)

what happens if a failed hack bricks the firmware in a way that the next person / group can't do anything more when it is there trun?

Then it was a successful hack!

Re:what happens if a failed hack bricks the firmwa (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 4 months ago | (#47424919)

makeing so that the car fails or goes into some kind of limited safe mode is successful hack? What if goes into a mode there you need to do a dealer only restore that they will not let anyone do other then the dealer and only after they verify that the owner is there to pick up the car when it is done. and that restore may come with a new $1000+ CPU / ECU with $250+ labor to install it?

Re:what happens if a failed hack bricks the firmwa (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47424981)

makeing so that the car fails or goes into some kind of limited safe mode is successful hack?

Making it burst into flames is a very successful hack.

Re:what happens if a failed hack bricks the firmwa (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | about 4 months ago | (#47425067)

makeing so that the car fails or goes into some kind of limited safe mode is successful hack?

Yes, if the goal is just to prove the thing can be hacked.

What if goes into a mode there you need to do a dealer only restore that they will not let anyone do other then the dealer and only after they verify that the owner is there to pick up the car when it is done. and that restore may come with a new $1000+ CPU / ECU with $250+ labor to install it?

OK, first thing - meet your new friend, the comma. [commnet.edu] Learn to understand one another.

Second, you're moving the goalposts. Stop that.

Third, to restate my point, if the idea is to find a flaw and exploit it, than any result other than "no flaw found/exploited" would be a successful one.

Re:what happens if a failed hack bricks the firmwa (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47425221)

Waht is a Trun?

Re:what happens if a failed hack bricks the firmwa (1)

fnj (64210) | about 4 months ago | (#47426527)

Pretty sure you can figure it out, champ.

Oh I see... (1)

operagost (62405) | about 4 months ago | (#47424859)

Reading the summary, I thought this would be about actual hacking... say, making the car do something awesome it couldn't do before. Maybe, like adding a special performance mode, improving its charge rate, or adding features to its entertainment system. I see it's really all about pwnage. I'll pass.

Re:Oh I see... (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 4 months ago | (#47425169)

Read about all the timing tricks etc you can do with a brush-less 3 phase motor. Check an RC truck forum, their motors are relatively cheap, hence they experiment a lot.

You can easily double a motors torque. Of course you will drastically shorten it's life. If you restore the firmware, I don't see how Tesla could prove you were hot rodding your car.

Re:Oh I see... (1)

Lumpy (12016) | about 4 months ago | (#47425267)

That is easy, when you flash the firmware on many of the high security types of systems it increments a counter when the bootloader loads the new firmware. they simply look at the counter and see if it matched the last time it was in for an update or was reported on the last update.

It's as simple as a small cheap i2C eeprom hidden away on the system that is not easily read from the running OS. the hacker would haveto disassemble the system hardware and basically reverse engineer the board to discover it. I have seen them hidden under other chips to save board space, but doing that would hide it from most hackers.

Re:Oh I see... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47425513)

Hasn't Slashdot already proven that security through obscurity doesn't work? Samsung Galaxy phones has almost the exact same "security" system in place to combat illegitimate firmwares. Guess what the fine fellows over at xda-developers were able to do. You go it, that counter never increments and you never get the Yellow exclimation point. Same can be done for a Tesla.
 
Gives rootkit a whole new meaning...

Let me get that (1)

Cabriel (803429) | about 4 months ago | (#47424861)

With $10,000 on the line, it'll be interesting to see how anyone manages to crack the code.

Fixed that for you. Not a question of "if"...

Figures (1)

Stumbles (602007) | about 4 months ago | (#47424865)

Instead of voiding the warranty Tesla should encourage the activity and request details of any successful hack so any security issues can be fixed.

Summary sucks (1)

jd2112 (1535857) | about 4 months ago | (#47424877)

Hack in what way? Bypass security? Make it do something cool that it wasn't originally designed to do? Or do you just need to chop it up with an ax?

Re:Summary sucks (1)

bobbied (2522392) | about 4 months ago | (#47425313)

Excellent point. What on earth do they mean by "hack"?

You give me a Tesla and a box of tools, I can hack the thing in some interesting way. Perhaps I can make it produce toast and keep your coffee warm.... In today's parlance, that would be a "hack" of a Tesla. I saw a story where a guy "hacked" his Prius by adding his own charging circuits to get more distance out of the battery pack, then figured out that he could run most of his home electronics directly from the 200V DC the battery provided. Billed the car as an emergency power supply of sorts, and a large one at that.

Now if they are asking you to hack the security or systems using only the exposed connection points, that's totally a different thing. Some how this is what I think they mean...

Already Hacked? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47424933)

Doesn't this story count as a hack? http://linux.slashdot.org/stor... [slashdot.org]

Is that really worth it? (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 4 months ago | (#47424953)

With $10,000 on the line, it'll be interesting to see if anyone manages to crack the code.

OK, so they have a $10K prize.

Now, purely to play devil's advocate -- if someone manages to exploit the system and doesn't tell anybody, is there more to be gained by that?

Even if it's just maliciously 'bricking' these cars, it seems like this incentive isn't as much as some other activities could be.

Hell, you could probably ransom people's cars back to them for more than that.

Re:Is that really worth it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47425137)

For students and academics hacking the car for $10,000 and the publicity is better than the "I steal cars"

Re:Is that really worth it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47425157)

Exactly. Don't go for the 10k. Go for the chance to practice with no repercussions.

Re:Is that really worth it? (1)

NormalVisual (565491) | about 4 months ago | (#47428079)

Not to mention the competition is in Bejing, so a lot of people would be spending several thousand dollars in travel expenses just to get the chance to win $10K, with most going home empty-handed. It's an interesting competition, but the prize money isn't enough to really encourage people IMO.

Re:Is that really worth it? (1)

Jeremi (14640) | about 4 months ago | (#47429429)

Hell, you could probably ransom people's cars back to them for more than that.

There aren't that many quality goods and services to spend your ransom money on in prison -- my understanding is that the selection is mainly limited to cigarettes, cell phones, drugs, and "protection".

make it $10 million (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47424961)

then i'll participate. $10k isn't worth getting out of bed for.

Hacking voids warranty? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47424963)

I doubt that would hold up in court unless they could prove the owner of the vehicle performed or conspired to perform the hack.
If a product I purchased was hacked by an outsider, I'd fully expect that to be covered by my warranty because the product security sucked.

Re:Hacking voids warranty? (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | about 4 months ago | (#47425155)

well did you reed the EULA? also it seems you said no the Norton antivirus car offer at the time of sale.

Re:Hacking voids warranty? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 4 months ago | (#47425193)

Gas powered car: Someone puts a bunch of mothballs in your gas tank. Your power doubles (but your expected engine life falls to less then 100 miles).

Electric car: Someone reprograms your motor controller. Your power doubles (but your expected engine life is halved or worse).

In ether case you should know that your car suddenly smoking it's tires is not natural and have it checked.

Who would do that? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47425125)

I'm lost on how $10K is going to motivate someone to spend and ruin $64k worth of car? You have to offer more than the price of the vehicle, or it's a net loss to the researcher who wins.

brilliant reselling opportunity! (2)

Cardoor (3488091) | about 4 months ago | (#47425415)

offer 10k as prize.. get participants to sign proper IP release.. then with hack in hand (and legal ownership), offer it to Tesla for... one BILLION dollars!

Least funny part (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47426339)

I read it quickly at first and thought it said 10,000 FINE .

kind of puts tesla in perspective.

Better tools? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#47428269)

> hack a Tesla Model S with a $10,000 prize

That sounds difficult.

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