Beta
×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

A New Homegrown OS For China Could Arrive By October

timothy posted about 2 months ago | from the which-governement-holds-your-data? dept.

Operating Systems 93

According to a Reuters report, China could have a new homegrown operating system by October to take on imported rivals such as Microsoft Corp, Google Inc and Apple Inc, Xinhua news agency said on Sunday. Computer technology became an area of tension between China and the United States after a number of run-ins over cyber security. China is now looking to help its domestic industry catch up with imported systems such as Microsoft's Windows and Google's mobile operating system Android. The operating system would first appear on desktop devices and later extend to smartphone and other mobile devices, Xinhua said, citing Ni Guangnan who heads an official OS development alliance established in March. It would make sense for even a "homegrown" operating system to be based on existing ones, in the way Red Flag Linux is. Conceptually related: Earlier this year, Chinese company Coship Electronics announced (and demonstrated) a mobile OS called 960 OS.

Sorry! There are no comments related to the filter you selected.

i'm thinking yet another linux distro (4, Insightful)

0xdeaddead (797696) | about 2 months ago | (#47741705)

that'll be abandoned in 2-3 years.

Just what we need, more fragmentation. And zero innovation.

Re:i'm thinking yet another linux distro (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741759)

that'll be abandoned in 2-3 years.

Just what we need, more fragmentation. And zero innovation.

Hey man, I'm still running Red Flag Linux [wikipedia.org] in 2014 and loving it.

Re:i'm thinking yet another linux distro (1)

eht (8912) | about 2 months ago | (#47742151)

Red Flag Linux Closure [wikipedia.org] on the exact page you linked

Re:i'm thinking yet another linux distro (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47744555)

That might have been the joke.

Re: i'm thinking yet another linux distro (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742303)

I guess /. isn't blocked in China. Surprised to find a CCP member here though.

Re:i'm thinking yet another linux distro (1)

silent-listener (3457453) | about 2 months ago | (#47749015)

And where you can download the Red Flag distribution ? Not on the official website, all dead links.

Many new OS from East Asian Nations (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741765)

You will be surprised to know how many new OS are being brewed in East Asian Nations such as Japan, Korea and China

Some of them are based on Linux, yes, but there are others which are not based on Linux

In Korea and in Japan there are separate efforts to upgrade and extend the Plan-9 OS, for example

Re:Many new OS from East Asian Nations (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741791)

Tizen [wikipedia.org] (developed by Samsung) comes to mind here too.

Re:Many new OS from East Asian Nations (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741911)

Tizen is a Linux-based OS. He is talkin about non Linux-based OSes. There is Plan-9, also the japanese have iTron.

And obviously there are a lot of other non mainstream kernels like L4, Minix, Infinity, Inferno, etc...

Re: Many new OS from East Asian Nations (1)

broadriver (1777832) | about 2 months ago | (#47748639)

Are there any new OSs that are not based on something originally developed in the United States?

Re: Many new OS from East Asian Nations (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47750523)

TRON, an embedded system used in the bulk of Japanese products. It is free and it frightened Microsoft and Apple so much that during the trade talks between the USA and Japan in the latter half of the 1980's, they got the US trade delegation to force a promise out of the nips not to distribute it in the west in source code form. You can thank TRON for Unicode also, Microsoft started developing that in response to the TRON character system, BTW, there are still Asian scripting system variations you can use with TRON that are not yet supported by Unicode.

There were lots of Japanese OS's, and at the least 3 developed in Hong Kong up until the 1990's, but lost out in the long run to MS, et al. There was a South Korean system as well but that might have been a C/PM clone, cannot remember.

Re:i'm thinking yet another linux distro (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741817)

Well if you are happy with Windows/Android/Linux that's cool, but I think we definitely need more flavors of open and secure domestic operating systems. However I wouldn't think they'd have an open source, considering China's track record.

Re:i'm thinking yet another linux distro (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741835)

"Open and secure"
You've just said 2 things that are completely unrelated to China.
You can bet there will be spyware in there from the Chinese government as well as pretty much everything built-in from their "great firewall" that blocks everything worth doing on the internet.

Re:i'm thinking yet another linux distro (1)

Stan92057 (737634) | about 2 months ago | (#47741917)

China market is not open and free they will have zero choice of what OS they want to use.

Re:i'm thinking yet another linux distro (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742039)

I'm thinking red flag re-skinned and updated a bit...

Re:i'm thinking yet another linux distro (2)

mspohr (589790) | about 2 months ago | (#47742345)

Much better to have just one choice and force everyone to use it.
Easier to maintain.
Easier to patch.
Easier to harvest data.
Easier to write malware for.
Easier to infiltrate.
Easier to monitor.
For the users... not so great.

Re:i'm thinking yet another linux distro (3, Insightful)

AxeTheMax (1163705) | about 2 months ago | (#47742817)

Are you talking about Windows?

What we need is... (1)

voltorb (2668983) | about 2 months ago | (#47742413)

A Chinese-quality, rigged OS with backdoors

What we need is... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742469)

Why begs the question who is going to use it? The Government won't use it. The people certainly wont.

What we need is... (1)

voltorb (2668983) | about 2 months ago | (#47744759)

Unless the government enforces its usage by law for people.

Anyone use Inspur K-UX? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742483)

Anyone use Inspur K-UX? If they got it certified UNIX, did they develop it from an existing UNIX? It looks like they ship on their own Itanium systems.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inspur_K-UX [wikipedia.org]

Re:i'm thinking yet another linux distro (1)

silent-listener (3457453) | about 2 months ago | (#47748989)

If it comes from "Beijing" it shall not be general accepted. China needs a real OpenSource project, but before this will happen there must change something.

And how have those worked out so far (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741709)

Right.

Will this stop NSA espionage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741721)

Probably not, stealing new technologies and contract information is very lucrative business.
New OS will become a hacking target of US agencies.

Re:Will this stop NSA espionage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741923)

Probably not, stealing new technologies and contract information is very lucrative business.

For China it is, for NSA it isn't.

No doubt the new OS will be used to help Chia assert hegemony over its neighbors and the South China Sea. It will become a tools of Chinese imperialism.

Re:Will this stop NSA espionage? (1)

Inconexo (1401585) | about 2 months ago | (#47748513)

You mean if they manage to do something useful. I'm not sure they can best the existing technologies.

Desktop is dead (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741745)

Haven't they heard? The desktop computer is dead. This OS will be obsolete before it is even released.

They prolly have the source code (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741773)

To every commercial OS, programming language compiler, DBMS, application server, CAD system, ERP etc. thanks to their hackers and ex-pats.

I wonder who's got the fun task of reading all that shit.

Re:They prolly have the source code (1)

haruchai (17472) | about 2 months ago | (#47741797)

If it's not fun for the Chinese, it's not fun for all the developers & maintenance programmers who have to fix, support & enhance all that shit.

Chinese programming language (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741827)

When they come up with the first Chinese programming language, they'll either leave the west in the dust or tangle themselves up for good. Say what you will about unicode domains, but without a common language, the world will always descend into us vs. them.

Re:Chinese programming language (2)

aix tom (902140) | about 2 months ago | (#47741853)

From experience, it is usually enough to have the comments and the variable names in a foreign language you don't understand to make source code completely unreadable.

Re: Chinese programming language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47744139)

From experience, variable names in any language (spoken or programming) should not be trusted to tell you anything useful. It is a bonus if they do. Comments can easily be translated online but so few are truly useful.

Chinese programming language (2)

voltorb (2668983) | about 2 months ago | (#47742433)

I can already see it. A cheap rip of C language, symbols replaced with Chinese characters, and the language is called ming, coming with a book that is a complete rip off the white book.

Sorry, not a win for Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741843)

Even if this is based on Linux, it isn't a win despite what some people on here will say. China wants ownership and control of the operating system, so it won't be a benefit back to the community. Also, the GPL among other licenses are not (mostly) enforceable in China due to weak intellectual property laws and enforcement.

Let me guess (0, Troll)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 months ago | (#47741885)

Heh heh. Another crusty Linux distro coming up. When they discover how buggy the desktop is, they will ultimately bite the bullet and buy the damn Windows licenses.

Re:Let me guess (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 2 months ago | (#47741961)

What bugs are you talking about? It's great that you've never used a decent Linux distribution. Indeed, it's a serious win for Linux that you are not involved with it. Just stop spreading lies and bullshit in between bids to be M$'s latest casting couch participant.

Re:Let me guess (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 2 months ago | (#47742053)

Do you think that your carefully crafted arguments convinced him, or anybody? (Outside of 4chan)

Apparently anybody that disagrees with you is a fool, liar, and a paid stooge of ${ORG}.

Linux would be better off if it had fewer poison pen advocates like you.

Re:Let me guess (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 2 months ago | (#47742085)

Yes, beause that's what causes Linux to run reliably. Poision pen advocates.

Re:Let me guess (2)

cold fjord (826450) | about 2 months ago | (#47742207)

So we can thank you for the success of the Linux desktop then? Fine.

Re:Let me guess (0)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 2 months ago | (#47742279)

I can see why you like clever insults so much. They give you the opportunity to excercise your brilliant wit and provide clever responses!

Re:Let me guess (2)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 2 months ago | (#47742349)

I gave up Windows at home a year or so ago. I use RHEL6 on the desktop, though I'll bet Ubuntu is a smoother "consumer" experience. My main problems are not "bugs" - and of course Windows is far from bug-free - it's that Open Office (and the various permutations) simply doesn't stand up to Microsoft Office, but fortunatly I don't use it that much at home. I'm not a "gamer", but it seems to me, that's one of the big hold-backs for the Linux desktop.

At work, it's still Office, mostly for Excel and Outlook.

Re:Let me guess (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 2 months ago | (#47742463)

I would certainly never recommend Ubuntu. I haven't used RHEL lately, as I now use Fedora and Mageia. Most people don't need more functionality than Libre Office can provide. Microsoft Office is actually OK, but also still has bugs in it that have been there since I used it in 1990s, and if one really wants to run Office on Linux it can be done. They have also implemented the classic change it to be different approach M$ always has. The true irony is how people complain about "fragmentation" Seriously? These people have clearly never used M$ products for more than a couple of years. Stalwarts of consistency they are not.

Re:Let me guess (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 2 months ago | (#47742827)

Most people don't need more functionality than Libre Office can provide.

People keep saying that, but I don't know very many of these "most people", and believe my, most of the people I associate with are not "IT professionals". Many "regular people" use Excel for more than you might think, and Libre Office Calc simply does not cut it. Also I think this "most people don't need more than Libre Office" sets a pretty low bar. Yes, you can get by with Libre Office if what you mostly do is write letters to the home owners association... Much more than that, and "most people" are going to be unimpressed. I'm not trying to trash Libre Office, but it still needs a lot of work.

They have also implemented the classic change it to be different approach M$ always has. The true irony is how people complain about "fragmentation" Seriously? These people have clearly never used M$ products for more than a couple of years. Stalwarts of consistency they are not.

I think you confuse cosmetic changes and things like the Ribbon Menu for the more important core functionality of MS Office, which has only improved. Lots of people who are set in their ways trash the Ribbon Menu, but if that's your focus, you're not looking too deep. There are things I simply can't do with Libre Office Calc (but would like to very much) that are basic functionality in Excel.

Having said that, I've got used to Gimp's shortcomings verses Photoshop (yes, I know - "most people don't use the advanced Photoshop features"), and though I might try a different distro, RHEL6 and CentOS v6 desktops are perfictly functional to me. However, if the standard excuse for Linus desktop and application shortcomings is "most people don't need that", well, that's a seriously weak excuse that keeps Linux desktop down

Also, I notice you use the "M$" meme. Did you know that many Open Source companies are in it for the money as well? Certainly Red Hat is (I own stock - it's a publically traded for-profit company). I'm not a Socialist, so I really have no problem with Microsoft or anyone else seeking to prfit from their business. That includes the many many for-profit Open Source businesses.

Re:Let me guess (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 2 months ago | (#47742991)

The fact that you think most people even know what a spreadsheet is tells me that you have no idea how most people use a computer. Most people don't know how to use a spreadsheet. They send and receive email, browse the web, and post their latest mood on facebook. As far as the M$ meme, there is a pretty huge difference between seeking to make money, and launching FUD campaigns, intentionally undermining standards committees, and using illegal tactics to make said money.

Re:Let me guess (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 2 months ago | (#47743555)

The fact that you think most people even know what a spreadsheet is tells me that you have no idea how most people use a computer.

It's increadible that you would say such a thing. You either have a very low opinion of "most people", or are an out of touch eletist.

Re:Let me guess (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 2 months ago | (#47743581)

... or I know 100s of people, only a few of whom know how to use a spreadsheet.

Re:Let me guess (1)

Zero__Kelvin (151819) | about 2 months ago | (#47746747)

I see that you have marked me as your "Foe". I have marked you as my "Friend" accordingly. I am a long time advocate for people with mental illnesses, and wish you the best in your recovery. To that end, when you see the little green and red pill every time you read one of my posts, let that be a reminder to take your meds! Good luck!

Re:Let me guess (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | about 2 months ago | (#47758187)

What an obnoxious thing to say. You confirm that you are an elitist asshole.

Whatever...

Re:Let me guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742341)

I don't understand what moronic argument is going on here but the Linux as a desktop OS has worked fine for me since 1997 and it now works and looks better than ever.

No it does not run all those applications like Word, Outlook, Photoshop and a million others. I don't care and I don't miss them. If you want to use them then use Windows.

However it seems to me that as time goes by those applications are becoming less and less relevant. Word, for example, made sense when people were expecting to us their laser printers and produce paper copy. Today anything worth writing is written for the web, who needs Word for that?

Re:Let me guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742497)

Even the guy from linux action show had kde crap on him because of the heavy customization he was making. Kde, gnome, mate, cinnamon, lxde, xfce are freaking damn buggy as hell from crashing, to buttons not working when clicking on them, freezing, icons disappearing. It doesn't mean this buggy shit happens everyday or every week it just creeps up unexpectedly. Funny and sad thing is ubuntu unity is much more freaking stable and i'm not a fan of this non-customizing taskbar which you can't even move to the top or bottom.

Re:Let me guess (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 months ago | (#47742611)

Kde, gnome, mate, cinnamon, lxde, xfce are freaking damn buggy as hell from crashing, to buttons not working when clicking on them, freezing, icons disappearing. It doesn't mean this buggy shit happens everyday or every week it just creeps up unexpectedly.

Yes, that pretty much sums up what I meant when I said above "another crusty Linux distro coming up".

The weird little glitches that pop up on Linux desktop are the thing that get me.

Re:Let me guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47743559)

They'll probably just do like CentOS and download RHEL sources, swap out all the RH branding they give a shit to, and replace the RH logos with a China flag. And install a ton of backdoors, of course.

Re:Let me guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742627)

Its not crap its krap. FTFY

Re:Let me guess (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47744213)

Dumb fucking troll. Every desktop environment on Linux is like a half-aborted fetus with down syndrome. Inconsistent, sloppy, slow, and full of glitches. Of course, the "faithful" don't see it that way.

Re:Let me guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742475)

No, they saw Windows, discovered how buggy the damn desktop was, and developed their own. Its easier to fix your own than to try and fix windows. Microsoft has had more than 20 years to fix their buggy desktop, and they keep feeding us more cruft, more fragmentation, zero innovation (but higher license fees) coupled with draconian policies, and flat zero compatibility with anything else *including* everything else that they themselves made before (and *you* paid them craploads of money for).

Re:Let me guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742547)

Visual Studio is also way better and faster then Android Studio.

Re:Let me guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47744237)

Heh heh. Another crusty Linux distro coming up. When they discover how buggy the desktop is, they will ultimately bite the bullet and buy the damn Windows licenses.

Yeah, as opposed to the POS Microsoft Windows that needs 20+ patches every second Tuesday.

Re:Let me guess (1)

jones_supa (887896) | about 2 months ago | (#47745789)

What kind of shitty argument is that? The update system of Windows is way less intrusive than of Linux distros, which often have default settings that make the update manager pop on your face twice a week, usually with an annoying dialog instead of a discrete system tray icon. Besides, Patch Tuesday is always the second Tuesday of a month, not "every second Tuesday".

Now China Can put in their own backdoors (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741889)

Wonder how that will play out?

China Has Been Trying To Dump Windows for Years (4, Interesting)

rssrss (686344) | about 2 months ago | (#47741913)

Information Warfare: Running For Linux January 9, 2011 [strategypage.com]

For a decade now, China has been trying to get business and government users to adopt Unix (and later Linux) as their operating system. Yet most Chinese businesses, and many government departments, continue to use Microsoft operating systems. They do this because Microsoft Windows is widely pirated in China, and there's a large amount of pirated software you can use only on Windows systems. Another critical reason is that more games run on Windows machines, and that is important, even in China. Finally, the Chinese government is more resistant to complaints from Microsoft than Russia.

* * *

China has tried to get around this by subsidizing Linux training for Chinese engineers and computer technicians. The government also subsidized the development of the Kylin Unix based server software. Kylin is shareware, and anyone can download it. Kylin is also designed to be very secure, much more secure than Microsoft server software, and most other similar products. China has had more success in getting users to adopt non-Microsoft server software, but the real battleground is PCs.

Re:China Has Been Trying To Dump Windows for Years (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742377)

> Kylin is shareware, and anyone can download it. Kylin is also designed to be very secure, much more secure than Microsoft server software, and most other similar products.

The source code is not available. Kernel analysis, first published several years after Kylin was published, shows that Kylin is FreeBSD based, and *of course* they followed the BSD licensing of "we'll take your stuff, dip our dicks in it to give it that special proprietary flavor and insert whatever security violating smegma we want, then serve it up in a big mug for you to drink with a label that says 'natural flavors'".

This is the underlying problem with software that use "secret sauce". It's usually a recycled bodily fluid.

Re:China Has Been Trying To Dump Windows for Years (1)

penguinoid (724646) | about 2 months ago | (#47745019)

If I lived in China, I would not want to use software sponsored by the Chinese government. Yes, Windows could well have CIA backdoors, but if I lived in China that would worry me less.

heard this for years now (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741927)

I've heard variations of this story come up on slashdot since I started reading back in 2000. It seems like China is always starting some government mandated homegrown operating system... None of them ever seem to become successful. Here is what I could find just on the first page of a google search:

http://tech.slashdot.org/story/14/01/17/194245/chinas-government-unveils-china-operating-system-to-great-skepticism
http://linux-beta.slashdot.org/story/99/11/10/1457205/linux-to-be-official-os-of-peoples-republic-of-china
http://beta.slashdot.org/submission/3273261/china-gets-government-backed-operating-system-cos
http://bsd-beta.slashdot.org/submission/1010903/china-chooses-freebsd-as-basis-for-secure-os
http://beta.slashdot.org/submission/3279227/china-shows-off-its-own-smartphone-operating-system
http://linux.slashdot.org/story/08/12/03/2033243/red-flag-linux-forced-on-chinese-internet-cafes

Re:heard this for years now (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47754713)

What the articles never mention is which part of the Chinese government is involved. It is huge, and in this case parts always seem to be competing against each other. This always surprised me, given the whole central planning thing.

This feels political (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47741957)

The GFW is throttling VPNs more and more. As a foreigner here, it's getting harder to deal with daily tasks because even gmail is getting tough to access. China is doing everything to show that they don't need the rest of the world. China is trying to do everything to show that it doesn't need the outside world, so I think maybe it's time we should oblige and GTFO.

Reskinned Windows (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742007)

LoL, the other possibility is that they'll just reskin a pirated copy of windows.

Piracy will kill it (but not in the way you think) (1)

wisebabo (638845) | about 2 months ago | (#47742129)

No, the Chinese government would probably WELCOME piracy of their O.S. because it would mean that their backdoored (it that a word?) O.S. was spreading even beyond what they hoped for.

The problem is that very few software companies like Microsoft would write applications for it knowing that the number of actual PAYING customers in China will be few. I think I read somewhere that a Microsoft exec. said they made more money in the Netherlands than in all of China because of piracy. The simple business analysis would be that they wouldn't be able to recoup their development costs for another platform, especially if it was pirated even more. Maybe if China told every software company that wanted to sell its products in China that they HAD to develop for their O.S. then they would actually get some native applications; I think it would be equally likely that since these software companies weren't getting a lot of revenues anyway (because of piracy), they might pack up and leave. That's not to mention what using the Chinese O.S. would leak (more like gush like a firehose!) to the Chinese industrial complex about their products.

I'm assuming that if the O.S. was "compatible" in the sense that it could run Windows programs using some sort of similar API or emulation that people wouldn't tolerate the poor performance/bugginess. I figure they'd just buy a computer with the Chinese O.S., wipe the drive and install their (pirated) copy of Windows for the best computing experience (if you can call Windows "best"!). Also, as bad as the NSA is, perhaps the average Chinese citizen would prefer some faraway American govt. agency snooping on their computer than the jack-booted thugs who would kick down your door in a moments notice which is basically the Chinese State Security apparatus.

Re:Piracy will kill it (but not in the way you thi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47744731)

Hey wisebabo, didn't you say you were in China? Or did you come back to the West?
If you are still in China, it appears that they're pretty liberal with free speech, criticism of the state...on the internet.

Also, as bad as the NSA is, perhaps the average Chinese citizen would prefer some faraway American govt. agency snooping on their computer than the jack-booted thugs who would kick down your door in a moments notice which is basically the Chinese State Security apparatus.

Maybe you've been in China too long, there are plenty of videos on the evening news with SWAT teams dropping in on suspect Muslim extremists, grow houses, meth labs...
No jack boots usually, just plenty of firepower.

Re:Piracy will kill it (but not in the way you thi (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47744987)

Nope, I'm in another "Communist" country. Otherwise I'd be a lot more careful of my criticisms of China!

Good point though because I travel there every now and then. Maybe I should be a little less strident in my views. :) (Or post as an A/C and hope that Slashdot doesn't get hacked!)

Re:Piracy will kill it (but not in the way you thi (1)

jandersen (462034) | about 2 months ago | (#47754831)

You're all flaming enthusiasm, aren't you? You mention compatibility problems as the main reason why we should expect this to fail - but, as someone who has worked with cross platform development, I know that this is only a small problem. It is perfectly possible - easy, even - to write portable code, certainly on the back-end of an application; I have done so across all UNIXes, Linuxes, Windows, and even z/OS, VMS and MPE/iX. The only problems arise at the front-end, but with proper engineering, it is not even all that hard - just look at things like application servers and cloud: they mostly run Linux at the back-end, but you, the user, couldn't care less.

The only reason why we haven't seen companies make their applications in versions for both Windows, Linux and OSX is that somebody has put a lot of effort into stopping it from happening; I won't mention names. However, with Windows becoming obsolete (even Microsoft themselves seem to have lost the spirit), it is not unreasonable to expect that this may change, and China are well positioned to be the main driver of this, so I wouldn't write this new OS just like that.

Just another Linux distrubution (3, Interesting)

mjwalshe (1680392) | about 2 months ago | (#47742285)

In no way Is this a home grown operating system

Not another. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742395)

Red Flag Linux was effectively a duplicate of Red Hat.

GNU/Linux needs investment, auditing, etc (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742323)

It's not enough to simply put out a distribution. We need useful code that runs on it, new features (or better yet- improvements on the code itself, ie bugs fixes, etc).

However the problem isn't entirely the OS, but a lack of auditing. While insanely expensive every piece of non-complex code aught to have two eyes on it at all times and more complex code should have dozens.

Then we need good solid default security policies for different audiences that are easy to apply and separation of concerns. If we're concluding that a small group of users needs access to macros (lets make a huge category called business), then you can apply that security policy which will enable macros, but in the mean time everybody else is going to get a 'home' security policy by default. Then those users who have that 'business' security policy applied will still have the application restricted and separated such that a vulnerability doesn't automatically impact the whole system – or provide an intruder access to every file on the system.

Then we need hardware and software where the code is available. Nothing should be held back, not the 3d accelerated graphics firmware, not the BIOS, not the hard drive controller firmware, or keyboard micro code. Everything including the CPU micro code should be published under a free software license.

Then you have to worry about the hardware itself. The design of hardware today is scary. We shouldn't be using USB flash drives for instance. In an ideal world plugging in a standard device like this shouldn't be able to compromise my machine. We need a complete redesign to reduce the surface area of attack. Computers don't need built-in microphones or webcams, etc.

China is the largest market (3, Interesting)

minstrelmike (1602771) | about 2 months ago | (#47742491)

When looking into video game consoles, I was stunned to realize that Xbox and PS3/4 are _not_ even close to being the most popular video game consoles in the world. The top three are all Chinese consoles you've never heard of. Population-wise, the US is to China as VietNam is to the US and I suspect the Chinese worry about Americans about as much as we Americans worry about the Vietnamese.

Our economic might blinds us to the realities of the actual world and that perhaps is the most dangerous flaw in American culture. Remember the ancient Egyptians, the ancient Greeks (both civilizations), the Romans, the Ottomans? (There is a similar litany for homegrown emperors in China, also, but no one talks about it.)

A search says otherwise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47745497)

A search on China daily says otherwise:
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/business/2014-05/05/content_17484594_6.htm

All the usual suspects there.

Re:A search says otherwise (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47753177)

Agreed, I'd really like to see a citation for the above. Nothing online anywhere suggests otherwise. I did read that consoles were banned up until 2013 (since 2000) and I can't imagine they had any consoles in the top 10 before 2000 nor have they made one that's taken the market by storm in the last 8 months.

Red Flag Linux doesn't exist anymore (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742533)

they shut down business several months ago.

Chinese control from center is fatal flaw (3, Interesting)

ebusinessmedia1 (561777) | about 2 months ago | (#47742729)

China has been controlled from the center for millennia; this is China's fatal flaw. Attempts to control population in a wired world is going to limit exposure to social and intellectual capital. Long run, it's a dead-end strategy. China should be most famous for wasting more social and intellectual capital than any culture in the history of humanity, entirely due to closing off possibility via control from the center.

Re:Chinese control from center is fatal flaw (1)

msobkow (48369) | about 2 months ago | (#47743249)

China is no more "controlled from the center" than any other government-run country. They have local governments and bureaucrats, they have fiefdom cities, they have states/provinces. As with any other country, there is a hierarchy of management.

And unlike the communist days, there is little to no "central management" of resources in China any more, other than the government investing in large projects that would be studied to death and never approved here in North America.

People just seem to love bashing on China, but most of their "facts" are as outdated as they would be if they were to bash the Germans for being "Nazis" in modern times.

Re: Chinese control from center is fatal flaw (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47743763)

Germans? It is liberals that are called Nazis now. As well as supporters of the Confederacy for some reason.

Chinese control from center is fatal flaw (1)

Qin Chen (3796517) | about 2 months ago | (#47746125)

Definitely true...

finishing an OS (1)

hooiberg (1789158) | about 2 months ago | (#47742767)

Starting an OS is all very well. But until the first release and a usable, we have commonly about ten years, required to finish the OS. This was with linux, with windows... So Chinese programmers may make a new OS. In ten years I might consider it.

Re:finishing an OS (1)

Daniel Oom (2826737) | about 2 months ago | (#47742821)

If it's supposed to be available in October, that sort of implies that they've been beta testing for a year, now.

Re:finishing an OS (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742937)

No, it suggests it will be begin beta testing in October.

Re:finishing an OS (1)

hooiberg (1789158) | about 2 months ago | (#47745967)

China and testing... I hope it is different from the famous Chinese Tamron lenses for cameras. If you are lucky, you get an excellent one with the quality equaling lenses five time the price, and if you are unlucky, you can send it right back... Because... testing?

The issue is device drivers (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47742865)

I can believe that one motivated guy, or a small team of guys could write a workable operating system kernel from scratch in the time span of 2-3 years. And the Chinese government could require that applications be written for it.

The GUI layer is tougher, but maybe they could adapt Qt for it.

But what about device drivers? Unless they're using one of the existing standards, i.e. Windows, Linux, or BSD/OS X, then it's going to be a bear convincing vendors to write drivers for their new OS. Not good enough to have a few on board - they need pretty much a complete sweep.

Why Bother? (4, Funny)

rssrss (686344) | about 2 months ago | (#47743609)

From the lead article:

"In May, China banned government use of Windows 8, Microsoft's latest operating system"

It seems to be a needless gesture. Even in the US, no one uses Windows 8.

Why Bother? (1)

Qin Chen (3796517) | about 2 months ago | (#47746095)

I use Windows 8 for couple of weeks when I can't use Linux and it's better than windows 7 and windows XP

KDE German. Linux Finn. (1)

pigsycyberbully (3450203) | about 2 months ago | (#47744027)

KDE German. Linux Finn. The PC ancient rubbish that killed invention. They used to be so many different computer systems and operating systems government departments used to have custom-built OS systems for custom-built computer systems. My first job when I left school was custom-built computer systems and today 2014 Windows still runs like it is running on a 286 The Asians, the Europeans, the Africans the Americans should have dumped that PC geriatric a long time ago. Son of a bricklayer Tommy Flowers died 1998 aged 92 Flowers was born at 160 Abbot Road, Poplar in London’s East End. Flowers designed Colossus, the world's first programmable electronic computer all the way back in history and when he died people were still using old U.S. shit PCs. We need a new computer system not a new OS. https://www.youtube.com/watch?... [youtube.com]

It is a very critical time for China and the world (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47745899)

I am a Chinese working as a China analyst at a think tank. It is becoming more and more apparent to many people, that the ruling Chinese Communist Party (CCP) knows it is on its last straw of survival.

The party is facing severe and increasing systematic stress on all fronts:

1. Increasing external oppositions from all other countries in the world including all of China's neighbours. They are forming more and more alliances and becoming more outspoken with rising strengths against China, in addition to increasing anti-China sentiment from people in all other countries. Many countries including Canada and Australia have tightened their immigration policy to prevent Chinese from entering their countries. Even on these casual internet message boards, when you look past the paid Chinese propaganda professional commenters, you notice rising general anti-China feelings from all over the world.

2. Increasing internal severe and massive violent social unrest and anti-CCP mutiny from people of all Chinese living places e.g. mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Xinjiang, Tibet, Macau etc. To beat down internal dissent, the CCP every year is forced to spend even more money than on its massive military budget. This is continuously worsened by the free flow of information, with Chinese people knowing more and more from travelling abroad and learning about truths from jumping beyond the "Great Fire Wall" on the internet.

3. Its own economy and social condition never able to develop to higher level beyond mass skill-less manufacturing, due to complete absence of law and common morals. High technology and innovations and scientific development all require many citizens working together voluntarily contributing long term in a system they trust, with things like rule of law, no censorship on knowledge, no restrictions on speech and expression, copyrights, patents, common morals when collaborating and trading with each other etc. These qualities are all destroyed in modern China by the CCP. When was the last time you heard an announcement of technology development or innovations or scientific breakthrough coming from a Chinese organization / company / university? You haven't because there ain't any. The only way modern China gets these things is from stealing and spying from all other countries, but that has become much more difficult since the whole world has caught on to their act.

This systematic fatal weakness is why you do not see even one Chinese brand or company that can compete in the international market in any industry of the human race. No rule of law in China also means no people or businesses, both Chinese and foreign, ever invest in China long-term or on a large scale because everything frequently change on a whim along with the political climate. No one trusts any contract or agreement in China because they are always broken by the Chinese and there is no legal protection whatsoever, meaning China can never advance to a knowledge economy or service economy. No rule of law also ensures Shanghai fail to become a financial city despite the CCP dumping huge resources into it for 30 years.

4. China's mass skill-less manufacturing itself is going away to other countries due to increasing costs and openly hostile and unfair business environment full of frauds and sanctioned protectionism and government robberies. The labor force is endlessly more demanding both in wages and benefits expectations and working conditions, especially since all of today's Chinese workers are single child used to coddling and indulgement by their families. It is further worsened by the rise of robotic automatic manufacturing and 3D printing. This situation is a death knock to the "growth-based legitimacy" of the CCP, which is the only thing CCP can rely on for continuing ruling power. For sure Chinese people tolerate the CCP when the economy seemingly explodes, but when one day it crashes and the country's hopeless bad shape hit them in the face the people's "support" for the CCP will turn on a dime.

Since six months ago, all the major economic indicators for China have gone on a continuing nosedive - including manufacturing orders, export volume, commercial investments, corporate credits, foreign capital inflow, domestic consumptions, real estate prices, Chinese tourist numbers and spendings, luxury goods demand, HSBC Service PMI, survey of business sentiments etc. The CCP is on its last resort of printing literally trillions of worthless renminbi to dump into the economy, causing way more long-term harm than short-term help, and when that is over there is nothing else the CCP can do to prop up the failing economy. China currently ranks 82nd on GDP per capita and that is the highest it can go before falling sharply in the coming near future.

5. Fierce unstoppable purges and mutually-destructive infighting among different factions within the party, who are imprisoning and killing each other every day. This power grab goes on under the thin guise of "anti-corruption drive" when everyone knows all officials in china are corrupted. No work to manage the country or guide the ship is being done while this is going on.

6. Its many previously-suppressed fatal problems have all grown too big to be contained all breaking out at the same time e.g.

- severe carcinogenic poisonous pollution everywhere in air and water and soil and their own food etc, with the WHO issuing multiple warnings on Chinese population having the fastest cancer growth rate in the whole world
- skyrocketing unrepayable bad debts of all kinds everywhere, its true scope unknown because all data from China are faked
- biggest housing bubble in human history, in addition to innumerous crumbling "ghost cities" and shoddily-built vanity project infrastructure that cannot and will not be used
- rapidly aging demographics with a 140:100 male:female gender ratio (from one child policy, culture of "leftover women", and many Chinese families killing their own daughters so as to chase boys)
- world's no.1 wealth inequality, with a Gini coefficient rivaling 18th century France just before the French revolution
- complete absence of soft power / cultural influence / social attraction, one result of which is minimal and sharply dwindling number of foreign professionals and tourists and students going to China
- all Chinese chasing foreign-brand goods and services while ditching low-quality Chinese-brands, who have a well known history of poisoning their own food and their own baby formula so as to make more money. This dashs CCP's hope to build indigenous industries and a domestic consumption economy
- corruptions and fraud throughout the whole rotten core of a system
- desperate mass exodus at all levels of Chinese society to escape the country using emigration or buying houses or study abroad or marriage to foreigners or plain old human smuggling, resulting in all able Chinese leaving taking huge amounts of talents and money out of the country
- the law of large numbers and the "middle-income trap" all work against the "growth-based legitimacy" CCP desperately needs for its survival

Most importantly, the CCP knows that if 1.4 billion Chinese learn about basic human qualities such as morals, truth, fairness, human rights, rule of law, freedom, universal values etc the CCP will be toppled very quickly. Therefore its state-controlled brainwashing education and propaganda machinations ensure a complete lack of morals and regard for laws in all Chinese growing up and beyond. This results in failure in all basic aspects of human interactions with every modern Chinese, whether it is business trading / personal dealings / technology development / creating innovations / human communications / scientific research / artistic expressions / teamwork collaborations / academic exchange etc. Another propaganda brainwashing technique used by the CCP is to make all Chinese people pathologically nationalistic and very emotional on this issue, so the CCP can always create and point to some "foreign enemies" so as to hide all the domestic crises and government robberies going on. This attention-diverting technique is the same trick magicians have used for more than a thousand years to fool their audience.

An interesting example would be the Chinese reaction to this report - they are expected to dismiss this report as total rubbish, accuse me "unpatriotic" for saying the truth, shout China will only become richer and stronger than all other countries, yet they will give no counter-arguments and they will make no acknowledgement to the horrible factual conditions and complete lack of basic human qualities listed above in modern China. Ironically, the longer Chinese people deny or refuse to acknowledge the CCP problem, the longer they are only digging themselves into the hole and hurting themselves for any chance of recovery. Consider the example of Google, Facebook, Wikipedia, Youtube, Twitter, Instagram etc - these services are all completely blocked in China while at the same time the rest of the planet are on these services every second communicating ideas with each other, making friends, exchanging knowledge, doing business, working together, improving science and technology and arts, and advancing humanity.

Some people say China economically developed a lot in past 30 years, but the truth is this "development" is actually debt borrowed against the future. After the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre of their own students, in order to survive and hang on to power, the CCP was forced to pursue short-term explosive economic growth that sacrifice everything else, including a foundation for future economic and social development. This "scorched earth" policy is like winning the lottery for corrupted CCP officials who can rob a lot of money from the country in the short-term before escaping to America. The only entity left to suffer is China's future starting from now, a country that has been turned by the CCP into a place with no law, no morals, no system for future scientific or economic or social development, no spiritual support apart from money, no trust or cooperation among Chinese, no trust or goodwill from foreigners, no other country as friends, all resources sold away cheaply, entire environment and air and water and soil and food fatally polluted, only social recognition is to make a lot of money for "face", no creativity or personal development for Chinese young people, a populus not allowed to know the truths and not allowed to say the truths.

The end result is that majority wealth of this "debt borrowed against the future" has gone to the 0.0000001% elite ruling class "princeling" CCP families (about 250 of them) who have already smuggled trillions of dollars abroad along with their U.S. passports and their own children (all Chinese elites and Politburo members hold foreign passports, with U.S. and U.K. being the most sought after choice). For the CCP in 1989, 1.4 billion people is great central-planning asset when the country start from nothing and you order them to do backbreaking mass manufacturing repetitive work 20 hours a day without workers protection of any kind. But in the 2014 borderless knowledge economy when that no longer works, 1.4 billion immoral and uncooperative and selfish and undeveloped and angry Chinese contained in a lawless system without any hopes of growth is very, very dangerous liability for the CCP.

All debts against the future have to be paid back - China is no exception. That moment may arrive a bit later than expected but it surely will come, as it has on 100% of occasions in human history. For China the moment has arrived to suffer the consequences for all its own chosen actions in past 30 years. All the festering fundamental systematic problems listed above and much more, are only getting worse and worse everyday until one day when the system can suddenly no longer bear.

Think USSR in 1989.

Might be a good opportunity for Linux community (1)

Qin Chen (3796517) | about 2 months ago | (#47746089)

Old story long told though, If China is determined to utilize Linux-based OS in public domains, there are more investment on Linux, both developers, maintainers, and technical support technicians. More investment surely help the development of technologies. To name an example, high-speed trains in China is actually boost a lot of projects that increase common welfare and live level for major populations in China. Let's hope that China take this serious and the bureaucracy don't boil it at all this time.

new platform (1)

guygo (894298) | about 2 months ago | (#47748213)

Oh good. Noob hackers need a new platform to practice on. Windows exploits are SO 20th century. If their knock-off OS is anything like their knock-off lunar rover, it should be as stable and secure as the first release of Win95, providing no end of fun for wannabe malware authors.

QQ in Linux (1)

LienRag (1787684) | about 2 months ago | (#47750299)

By the way, does anybody know how to use QQ/WeiXin on Linux?
Check for New Comments
Slashdot Login

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?