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Post-Microsoft Nokia Offering Mapping Services To Samsung

Soulskill posted about 2 months ago | from the will-map-for-food dept.

Software 67

jfruh writes: With Nokia's Windows Phone handset line sold off to Microsoft, one of the company's remaining businesses is its Here digital mapping service. No longer feeling loyalty to Microsoft or its OS, Nokia has inked a deal with Samsung to supply Here services to both Tizen and Android devices, including the upcoming Samsung smartwatch.

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Good (4, Interesting)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 2 months ago | (#47794547)

I use OSMAnd on my phone[1], but my girlfriend recently bought a Windows Phone and I've been very impressed with Nokia's mapping app (I actually like a lot of what Microsoft's done with Windows Phone 8, but it's a strange mix of very polished and well-designed UI parts and completely unfinished parts with missing features). It's good to see more competition with Google maps, which is becoming increasingly entrenched in spite of the fact that the UI is pretty poor in many regards and the mapping data is terrible. For example, here they're missing (or have in the wrong places) most of the cycle paths, which ends up with people regularly getting lost if they rely on Google, in spite of the fact that all of this data is in OpenStreetMap.

[1] For me, it's the killer app for Android. Offline maps, offline routing, and open source backed by high-quality mapping data from OpenStreetMap. I use the version from the F-Droid store, which doesn't have the limitations of the free version from Google Play and it's one of the few open source apps that I've donated money to.

Re:Good (1)

a0me (1422855) | about 2 months ago | (#47794619)

Regarding Google Maps, I found that their quality depend entirely of who they're getting their mapping data from. In Japan, they're getting it from the biggest local mapping company there is, and as a result Google Maps are way ahead of OpenStreetMap/Apple Maps, and even other companies that use the same base data (Bing, Yahoo!, etc.).

Re:Good (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 2 months ago | (#47794721)

I don't know about rural Japan, but I found the OSM data far better when I visited Tokyo a few months ago. Google didn't know building names and placed a load of things that we were trying to visit a few blocks away from where they actually were. This was very frustrating as the web site that we were using to find vegetarian restaurants used Google maps - we spent half an hour one lunchtime walking in the wrong direction, because we'd come to a junction and, according to the Google map needed to turn left and would then see our destination on the right. It turned out, when we eventually found it, that we should have turned right.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47796013)

I didn`t have the same experience (2 years ago). Google maps (with offline caching of POI and public transport) was excellent at getting me to the places I wanted to visit, both in the big cities and the smaller places.

Re:Good (2)

Luckyo (1726890) | about 2 months ago | (#47795855)

Then this is actually bad news. Samsung got android exclusivity according to some reports.

Re:Good (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47797679)

/. has become a willing partner in the act of spreading Pro-Microsoft propagandum

It has been for several years now.

Microsoft learned from the Vista fiasco and employed Burson Marsteller and Waggener Edstrom as Social Media Managers here and at other tech sites. They've been very active at slandering Microsoft competitors and promoting Microsoft products. That what pretty much killed the community here, and was the beginning of Slashdot's slide into irrelevance.

Some subjects are completely undiscussable now. Just try mentioning BSODs and you'll have a dozen responders accusing you of living in the '90s...

Re:Good (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 2 months ago | (#47798853)

Not sure what post you think you're replying to, but the quoted line didn't appear in my post...

Re:Good (1)

MrHanky (141717) | about 2 months ago | (#47799237)

Reporting errors in Google Maps used to be fairly simple, if you knew how, but the constant changes in the UI makes it difficult. When they first introduced bicycle maps, there were quite a few grave errors initially (up/down a stairway, along a motorway where bicycling is prohibited). They were fixed pretty soon after I reported them.

After messing around in Maps for a while (web version), I see that it's still easy enough to report errors. Just click the speech bubble.

Re:Good (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 2 months ago | (#47799515)

If I'm going to report errors in a map, I'd rather do so with a map that releases its data under a license that allows reuse. Since such a map already exists and doesn't have the errors in Google Maps, I don't see much incentive. Google can pull the data from there if they want. This is actually one case where Microsoft has been a bit nicer: they allowed OSM to trace their satellite images to improve maps. Google Maps, in contrast, is very protective over their data.

Re:Good (1)

MrHanky (141717) | about 2 months ago | (#47799887)

The incentive is of course to get a better map. I'm happy to report bugs in software I use, as long as it isn't too inconvenient.

Re:Good (1)

unixisc (2429386) | about 2 months ago | (#47801939)

I use OSMAnd on my phone[1], but my girlfriend recently bought a Windows Phone and I've been very impressed with Nokia's mapping app (I actually like a lot of what Microsoft's done with Windows Phone 8, but it's a strange mix of very polished and well-designed UI parts and completely unfinished parts with missing features). It's good to see more competition with Google maps, which is becoming increasingly entrenched in spite of the fact that the UI is pretty poor in many regards and the mapping data is terrible. For example, here they're missing (or have in the wrong places) most of the cycle paths, which ends up with people regularly getting lost if they rely on Google, in spite of the fact that all of this data is in OpenStreetMap.

[1] For me, it's the killer app for Android. Offline maps, offline routing, and open source backed by high-quality mapping data from OpenStreetMap. I use the version from the F-Droid store, which doesn't have the limitations of the free version from Google Play and it's one of the few open source apps that I've donated money to.

I fully agree w/ this. I have an iPhone now, but in another country, I had a Lumia 520 - the entry level phone. There, HERE maps were far superior to either the Google maps on Android, or the Apple maps of that space. Regardless of what one might think of Nokia, they did a good job in that place.

On the Windows Phone itself, it was pretty good. Particularly compelling was the OneNote - the 2013 version completely changes how one can use the phone. But I wouldn't recommend the Lumia now given Microsoft's takeover, and the questionable future of the platform given all their layoffs in the Nokia phone division

Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (4, Interesting)

ad454 (325846) | about 2 months ago | (#47794607)

I recently picked up a cheap refurbished factory unlocked Nokia Lumia as a secondary phone, specifically for the free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps support. Considering the expense of getting a TomTom, Garmin, or iGO dedicated GPS unit with world map coverage plus unlimited updates, the Nokia Lumia was a much cheaper option. Having factory unlock, also allows me to purchase inexpensive micro-SIM GSM cards when travelling to avoid costly roaming charges.

In fact, in my most recent trip to Europe, I used it specifically for drive navigation with a cheap removable phone bracket, and it worked just as good as dedicated GPS. Saving me much more than the cost of this phone compared to renting GPS navigation for 2 weeks from the car rental company.

Furthermore, my Nokia phone is lighter, slimmer, and has better (> 720p) display than dedicated GPS. Furthermore, Nokia Here Maps, it also works great when walking around the city, looking for hotel and other POI.

My only complaint is that despite having offline maps for just about every significant country, South Korea and Japan are suspiciously missing, even though I really need them. :(

My biggest compliant with Windows Phone 8.1, running on my Nokia Lumia, is the lack of local offline backups (since I don't trust the cloud with my data), and device client certificate management needed for S/MIME, Wireless WPA-Enterprise, web client certificates, etc. Both of these are features are fully supported for years on iOS and Android, but Windows Phone 8.1 requires sending up MDM (Mobile Device Management Server) on WIndows 8.* to manage PKI externally, as oppose to on the device locally like iOS and Android do.

For my next primary phone, I have want a phablet, and have been on the fence between upcoming iPhone 6 (with large 5.5" of higher display) or Samsung Galaxy Note 4, both hopefully available by the end of this year.

Havinvg Nokia Here Drive+Maps with free downloadable offline maps on the upcoming Samsung Galaxy Note 4 would be enough to tip the scales away from iPhone 6.

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (1)

lennier1 (264730) | about 2 months ago | (#47794971)

Don't forget the other advantages of satnav in a handheld device, like how you can take the device with you, save the spot where you parked the car as a way point.

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47796649)

Hi, I've got the Lumia. It's easier than that. When you reach your destination, you put your finger on the spot and hold it for a second to bring up the context menu. One of the options is "pin my location to start", and when you do that you get a map shortcut to your current location pinned on the start menu. When ever you want to get back to that spot, you just open the bookmark and you have the route mapped for you. When you're done, you just unpin the bookmark and it's gone.

The funny thing is, Windows phone really is the best phone OS available right now (or at least it would be if I could get rid of OneCloud and install the browser of my choice), the HERE maps apps are just awesome, and the Nokia hardware is among the best if not the best. But they were too late to market so the app landscape outside of Microsoft/Nokia/Here's offerings sucks monkey balls.

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (1)

DogDude (805747) | about 2 months ago | (#47795055)

Why not just use the mapping stuff that comes with Windows Phone? Seems to work just fine.

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47795503)

You mean the Nokia Here Maps that have come standard with 95% of all Windows phones sold? Or are you talking about the useless Bing crap that is shipped with HTC Windows phones?

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (1)

mick88 (198800) | about a month ago | (#47796275)

The built-in maps do work just fine, however there are no spoken "turn-by-turn" directions anymore. In earlier versions of Windows Phone there was support for this, but no longer. The Nokia app has it & that's about the only reason to use it.

I guess the other handy feature of the Nokia app is that you can change the perspective to a "driver's view" vs. overhead map view, kinda like what you see on TomTom or Garmin.

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47796715)

I'm running the current developer release of 8.1 and it still has the spoken turn by turn directions.

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47798911)

I second this.

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (1)

mick88 (198800) | about 2 months ago | (#47801655)

Hmm interesting. My "official" 8.1 build on my nokia 635 doesn't have the feature but defaults to Nokia for the turn-by-turn. My HTC 8x running windows 8 did have it tho. I wonder if it's just purposely disabled on Nokia devices now?

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (1)

DogDude (805747) | about 2 months ago | (#47801557)

So in other words, retarded people can no longer use the built-in Windows Phone maps?

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (1)

drolli (522659) | about 2 months ago | (#47795533)

Nokia never sold any phones in Japan. (it was impossible to even get a charger for my Nokia phone)

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47795881)

That's just not true. A variety of models were available from a number of carriers. See here [wikipedia.org] .

Granted, they were never able to really break into the market and none of the carriers really pushed Nokia phones because they lacked a lot of features that domestic phones had. And the phones were of course branded to the carrier, not "Nokia" as such.

Re:Love Free Offline Nokia Here Drive+Maps (1)

Timelord70 (1155631) | about 2 months ago | (#47797493)

Many many moons ago (around 2009 I think) Nokia _did_ have maps for all of Japan available for download. They didn't have turn by turn navigation, but they did have all the streets. I used them on my E90 when I went over there and it worked a treat. Even better, if you wanted to you could use Google Maps on it to find a specific location, save it as a landmark in google maps and it would show up in Nokia's maps as well.

When they upgraded to version 3 of the maps a few years later with the new firmware, the latest maps for Japan only showed the highways and wouldn't work with the old V2 version of the maps. When I went there again late last year I had to downgrade my E90 (yes, this is still my current mobile phone :-)) to an older version of the firmware and put the maps back on again from an old backup I did back in 2009. Keep in mind that this phone is still running Symbian... try finding support for that now! Luckily I kept the install files for Google Maps as well as I don't think you can get the Symbian version of that anymore either, although it still works with current Google Earth data quite happily.

I don't see any reason why Nokia couldn't at least make this old data available and bring it up to something usable with their current mapping programs. They clearly had it, then got rid of it, and don't offer an alternative for offline mapping, or even their browser based mapping software.

Nokia Handsets Can Rise Again (4, Interesting)

SpzToid (869795) | about 2 months ago | (#47794609)

Nokia did not sell the name 'Nokia' to Microsoft, and from January 1, 2016, is free from Microsoft's shackles to sell mobile phones again. Microsoft can't sell "Nokia Lumias", only Microsoft Lumias.

The option remains open to, for example, purchase Jolla and in doing so, regain much of the former Nokia team and (and their funky Linux from Finland, where it all started...) and use the modern version that's available to them of the OS that once was Harmatten/Meego, that drives the awesome N9/N950.

In fact some of the funding to start Jolla came from severance packages to the team that was laid of by Elop, having delivered the N9, in spite of Elop's interference and obstacles on the way to enriching himself and his masters.

Re:Nokia Handsets Can Rise Again (2)

sd4f (1891894) | about 2 months ago | (#47794667)

I doubt they will go back in. Nokia stuffed up massively, they got bought out, that's it. It's a real pity, because the lumia hardware has been nothing short of spectacular, unfortunately WP is a bit wanting, and MS were onto a good thing, but fiddled with it a bit too much in the latest 8.1 update and pulled quite a few good features they didn't want to keep working on.

Why rewrite history...Again (0)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 months ago | (#47794859)

...the lumia hardware has been nothing short of spectacular....

Except it wasn't. At launch it had a distinctive look(Like the N9), but the hardware failed to capitalise on Nokia technology...because it wasn't built by Nokia. It was part of Elops move to a more Apple model...or Designed in Finland(by Microsoft!?). High end camera technology simply ignored, keyboards simply not an option, and hardware dictated to by Microsoft.The fact that early models not upgradeable, due (in part) to their weak specification is simply more petrol on the burning platform that is Windows Phone.

In fact the only place the phones make sense was right at the low end of the market...which is where they did sell some in the western world, and then failed to capitalise(simply where not interested in!?) on it before the rise of the Motorola G...Project Svelte...Motorola E...Android One...Blah Blah Blah

Re:Nokia Handsets Can Rise Again (1)

Frankie70 (803801) | about 2 months ago | (#47795315)

What features did they pull? I recently updated my WP8 to WP8.1 - still haven't figured out what's changed.

Re:Nokia Handsets Can Rise Again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797033)

A lot of the social media integration apparently. Things like 'Check In' now open the Facebook app rather than letting you do it through the UI. There's some other stuff I can't remember right now

Re:Nokia Handsets Can Rise Again (1)

sd4f (1891894) | about a month ago | (#47797203)

As the other AC said, social media integration has been pulled and a lot of the best functions are gone. I understand that it was difficult to achieve, but the way they've pulled it, has really undermined their initial intention. There's a few other things which they've modified in an annoying way. Separate volume profiles was needed, but it's really annoying to put the phone on silent now. With that said, some really important features were added; file manager and ability to download files was a critical feature as the phone was incredibly limiting before.

Re:Nokia Handsets Can Rise Again (1)

hatchet (528688) | about 2 months ago | (#47795485)

I have totally different experience. Out of all modern mobile OS-es i like WP8.1 the most.

But damn, those Nokia phones can't satisfy my needs. I just don't like too large displays - 4" would be perfect. But i also want that amazing camera from Lumia 930...

So, alternative would be something like HTC 8x, but then i'm left without Nokia Here navigation...

Re:Nokia Handsets Can Rise Again (1)

sd4f (1891894) | about a month ago | (#47797185)

The 830 rumours seem to make out that it may be the 'good enough phone' but will have the 20MP camera. I care little for 1080p displays, so don't really want something that drains more battery than it has to.

Re:Nokia Handsets Can Rise Again (1)

dbIII (701233) | about 2 months ago | (#47797693)

I doubt they will go back in. Nokia stuffed up massively

You missed a WAS in there - Nokia was stuffed up massively as a deliberate action.
There can hardly be anything more blatant than an MS guy leaving to do his first CEO gig in a major multinational with the world's largest market share in mobile phones, then transferring that multinational to MS products, running down the market share and company value, then going back to MS as they bought the diminished company. It was a blatant corporate raid even if it was done with the blessing of the board. People with no track record as a CEO do not get to run major multinationals unless there is some sort of game afoot and pressure on the board (or specifically extra weight in their wallets).
I feel sorry for the Trolltech guys that would have been better off in the long run if they hadn't joined up with Nokia. They would still be working on Qt if they were not removed as part of Elop's sabotage of Nokia to bring down the share price.

Re:Nokia Handsets Can Rise Again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47799081)

Elop was CEO of Macromedia... for three months, until he sold them to Adobe.

Nokia is a not a Phone company (4, Insightful)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 months ago | (#47795023)

The option remains open to, for example, purchase Jolla...

Pun not intended...but that boat has sailed at least for Nokia. Nokia might be free of the shackles of Microsoft, but who is lest to care. Elops misguided 1:1 conversion from symbian to Windows Phone strategy when its company was twice the size of Apple and four times the size of Microsoft and growing has failed. it is not even in the top 10 of phone manufactures. Its brand irreparably tarnished.

Elop is his desire to sell Nokia to Microsoft for Millions in his own pocket has cost Nokia billions, has cost tens of thousands of employees jobs(some still to go), manufacturing worldwide(Luminas are simply another third party Chinese phone), even its headquarters has been sold off. Its carrier connections destroyed though Its infrastructure is simply none existent. What is left is not a phone company...just another patent troll(I know they own more) waiting for a big buyout.

I wish Jolla all the best, but for any success anyone e.g. Intel, Lenovo, Facebook all would be better choices. Nokia is simply not a contender.

Re:Nokia is a not a Phone company (1)

Frankie70 (803801) | about 2 months ago | (#47795325)

What is left is not a phone company...just another patent troll(I know they own more) waiting for a big buyout.

Yeah, they own more. Their telecom equipment division has 13 billion dollars revenue.

Re:Nokia is a not a Phone company (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47795593)

Patent troll ..... the mobile phone division wan not even the biggest division of the company

Re:Nokia is a not a Phone company (1)

CptPicard (680154) | about a month ago | (#47796135)

I wouldn't call Nokia a patent troll if they enforce their patents more aggressively. So far they have been remarkably docile on that front. Nokia's patents are genuine inventions that the patent system is supposed to protect; if Nokia is not allowed to do that, we could just as well do away with the whole system.

Re:Nokia Handsets Can Rise Again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47795075)

If anything, they should go with Android. Just make it a version that isn't full of bloatware.

will Symbian rise again? Nokia Handsets (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47797125)

I have the C6-01, the mapping and turn-by-turn is the best, much better than any Garmin. And still the best reception and sound quality.

I will NEVER EVER EVER buy a Windows phone because MS canceled Skype for Symbian and sent Elop to trash Nokia. F 'em.

I've used iPhones and most all flavors of Android. Symbian Anna is still the easiest to use. The WiFi and BT will connect to a desktop/laptop as it should, and the cameras have great quality.

Screw Microsoft.

Not a surpising move (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47794661)

Considering Here had their own session at the last Tizen conference where Samsung was pretty much the driving force behind it, this deal was going to happen anyways. Here was pushing their services to developers and even offered limited free api calls of their service for developer apps. They knew they had some great data but windows phones was not able to help their revenue stream much so they need to get new customers.

Can't wait for a jolla phone... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47794683)

Can't wait for a jolla phone dual booting sailfish and tizen - until then I'll just have to keep wacking off!

huurrrrrrrrr!

here on fxOS (1)

ChunderDownunder (709234) | about 2 months ago | (#47794707)

It didn't come bundled on the Flame but Nokia have made it available on Firefox Marketplace.

Which makes sense if it's all HTML 5 like Tizen.

Will download (5, Insightful)

ebonum (830686) | about 2 months ago | (#47794713)

Google maps doesn't work offline. I know you can download and save maps. I downloaded sections two months ago. They where about 11 to 13 MB each. When I needed it, I pulled out my phone. GPS worked and it took me to my location on Google Map. But there was one problem. Only the major roads had names. All the small roads were missing names. To get that part of the map you need to connect to wi-fi or a cellular network - which wasn't an option. Caching a section of a map should mean just that - the map and all the important stuff, like road names, get cached. Perhaps at this point all the smart people have moved on an left Google leaving only the marketing and business people. Google's absolute insistence that you should not be allowed to do anything without being connected is infuriating. I assume Google can't stand the fact that there might be 10 minutes when they are not actively tracking one of their users.
To make things worse, when you have no signal and you need maps, you will find Google has deleted all your cached maps older than 30 days, so you are shit out of luck. Will someone inform Google that in most parts of the country it takes 3 years to build or change a road. Not 30 days. An old map is better than nothing. Actually, 99.99% of the time it is just fine.

I previously used Nokia Maps. I only use the map. No directions or other crap. As a simple map, it was an excellent product. I don't need or want anything else other than a map with correct, up to date roads and road names. I somehow passed the 3rd grade, so I have the intelligence to figure out directions on my own.

Re:Will download (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47794789)

Openstreetmap works very well in Europe. I just spent 4 weeks driving around with it - about 3000 km of touring.

Re:Will download (1)

ad454 (325846) | about 2 months ago | (#47795297)

I still need an offline mapping solution for Japan and South Korea, for upcoming trips, which are not supported by Nokia Here.

Any suggestion if there is any way to get an OpenStreetMap viewer and offline Japan+SouthKorea maps, which will work in one of these platforms: WindowsPhone8.1, iOS, Android, or desktop Ubuntu Linux? Thx.

Re:Will download (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47795437)

What is the problem with OSMAnd? It should work just fine on Android.
Looking at the repository it might even be possible to compile it for WP and iOS nowadays, but even if it's not production quality.
For iOS maps.me should be fine, even the free version (it exists on Android as well, but it completely loses against OSMAnd when it comes to features).
For desktop Linux I don't know (I guess josm should work, but it's not comfortable at all), but worst case you can set up your own OpenStreetMap server and import the whole world data...

Re:Will download (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47795469)

And for WindowsPhone you might want to check here: http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Windows_Phone
Looking at the descriptions, VectorialMap might be your best bet, though none seem to come even remotely close (whether feature-wise or usability) to what you get on other platforms.

Re:Will download (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47795811)

If you're used to the OpenStreetMap maps of Europe, then the map of Japan will disappoint, the map of South Korea even more so. To give you an impression of the level of detail you're (not) getting: The German city Hamburg is available as a 25MB download. All of South Korea fits into a 50MB download. All of Germany is about 2.4GB worth of downloads. Japan is 780MB. Germany and Japan have about the same land area.

Re:Will download (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47796759)

Given that he asked for a "OpenStreetMap viewer", the quality of the OSM map data is besides the point though...
And by what was said it seems those 780 MB of data are still 780 MB more than the alternatives offer...
Btw. I think that the 120 MB or so world basemap offers actually quite a lot of detail.

Re:Will download (1)

Eunuchswear (210685) | about a month ago | (#47797001)

Fuck, Openstreetmap works better than Google maps in west Africa, never mind Europe

Re:Will download (1)

RDW (41497) | about 2 months ago | (#47794925)

This might be a problem with Google Maps 7. I haven't noticed it with Maps 6, which seems to do full caching, and is a superior app all round. If you're on Android, there are various methods of 'upgrading' to the previous version here:

https://productforums.google.c... [google.com]

You're still stuck with the annoying marketing-driven 30 day limit, though with a proper manager for the cached maps in 6.x it's easy enough to download exactly the same area again. There are a number of other apps that handle offline maps on Android, of course, but I've yet to find anything that's otherwise as useful as Google Maps 6. A shame Nokia seems to be making Here a Samsung exclusive - Google could use some serious mapping competition across Android.

Re:Will download (1)

stephanruby (542433) | about a month ago | (#47797015)

It's not completely Google Maps fault.

A lot of the mapping data it uses is tied to some pretty strict licensing requirements. Of course, now that the open street map data is getting really good in many areas, it's time for Google Maps to filter out the licensed-bound data in favor of the open data, but that's a conflict in the making and Google may suffer some backlash from the third party mapping providers it hasn't purchased yet.

Re:Will download (1)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | about 2 months ago | (#47798813)

You're forgetting that even if you have cached the maps in detail (e.g. by beforehand zooming in to all the parts you really need on your trip) the navigation still doesn't work without being on-line.

After having toyed around with cached Google maps for years, this year I finally got a (2nd hand) car with navigator built in. No more mucking about when crossing country boundaries. Bliss at last.

For my usage (EU, frequent border hopper), Google maps is excellent for planning a trip. Not so much for actual moving between destinations.

Re:Will download (1)

Jack Griffin (3459907) | about 2 months ago | (#47799025)

Seems to be the big flaw in Google's Web-everything strategy, there are times we we can't be online, so need an offline option. I was in Indonesia a couple of months ago and didn't want to pay exorbitant roaming charges, so took my phone, but only to use the wi-fi at the hotel and emergency purposes. I tried to cache a few maps for use when venturing out but it didn't work. Google products are mostly shit. If they didn't have Search and Maps I doubt they'd still be around. If Nokia can kill their Maps market, then we only need someone to come up with a competitive Search app and we can kiss their hairy little arses goodbye. Seriously, how hard can it be to make decent Search?

Will download (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47800341)

Too true. I used my Nokia E5 for travel from Canada into USA. Enabled data so I could use the Nokia preloaded maps even though phone company rep said it would cost a fortune. My entire trip including one phone call and a few messages along with GPS use into USA was $3.82 on my pay by the minute system. The equivalent trip using Android would have been hundreds of dollars perhaps thousands.

Anything (1, Insightful)

vikingpower (768921) | about 2 months ago | (#47794757)

that will break the entrenchment of Google Maps, or contributes to breaking it, shoudl get our well-deserved attention.

Nothing (1)

tuppe666 (904118) | about 2 months ago | (#47795041)

that will break the entrenchment of Google Maps, or contributes to breaking it, shoudl get our well-deserved attention.

Why?

Re:Nothing (1)

vikingpower (768921) | about 2 months ago | (#47795839)

Because Google Maps compares awfully with Open Street Maps and other mapping services. Moreover, Google has gained too much power, way too large a piece of real estate in the town called the Internet, and knows too much about too many of us. Google should be broken down into pieces, just like Bell once was.

Yuo FZai7 It (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47795191)

was at the same Let's kkep to

Great (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47795535)

Nokia supposedly had the only map data that rivaled Googles. Anything to break Google's monopoly on map data. Now if Nokia would just make a decent iOS app with offline data, I would switch.

Re:Great (1)

ChilyWily (162187) | about 2 months ago | (#47795741)

Same here... they used to have it and then took it off when iOS 7 was released due to "...iOS7 harm[s] the User Experience". Not exactly sure what Nokia meant with that statement. Ref: Article here [engadget.com]

All these nokia things (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47795623)

All these nokia things sorta proves Microsoft bought a massive turd for billions...
All the important parts are still owned by Nokia, and Nokia just found a way to rescue itself by dumping their failing mobile phone business..

in the end it's Nokia that made the smart decision, and Microsoft will always believe they did...

Re:All these nokia things (1)

CptPicard (680154) | about a month ago | (#47796165)

As a Finn and a recently returned Nokia shareholder, I actually agree with you. Of course I was unhappy with this blatantly obvious Elop theater when it was going on, but let's face it -- smartphones are commodities as devices, and if you've lost out on the ecosystem, the best you can do is offload your manufacturing for someone who is dumb enough to pay a fair amount of money for it.

The remaining parts of Nokia are at least a healthy company with many options open for the future... it wouldn't be the first time the firm reinvents itself since the 19th century.

Re:All these nokia things (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 2 months ago | (#47798957)

On top of that, MS might actually get a decent windows phone out. They have the money to follow through, they have the need to get their own system on peoples pockets. Now they have a big chunk of old nokia people designing the hardware. Windows phones are actually very nice phones, even if the "ecosystem" is a bit lacking. Here maps, nice UI, everything works. Nice integration with outlook. I like the windows phone UI most of all the current options.

sideload? (1)

Espectr0 (577637) | about a month ago | (#47795959)

here's (no pun intended) hoping that we can sideload the here app somehow on the rest of android phones

Post-Microsoft (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a month ago | (#47796523)

I got all excited reading "Post-Microsoft" in the title to the story, immediately dreaming of a post-Microsoft world..

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